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eBook The Niihau Incident: The True Story of the Japanese Fighter Pilot Who, After the Pearl Harbor Attack, Crash-Landed on the Hawaiian Island of Niihau and Terrorized the Residents download
History
Author: Allan Beekman
ISBN: 0960913203
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 127 pages
Publisher Heritage Press of Pacific; First Edition edition (June 1, 1982)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 263
ePUB size: 1733 kb
FB2 size: 1901 kb
DJVU size: 1953 kb
Other formats: docx lrf lrf txt

eBook The Niihau Incident: The True Story of the Japanese Fighter Pilot Who, After the Pearl Harbor Attack, Crash-Landed on the Hawaiian Island of Niihau and Terrorized the Residents download

by Allan Beekman


The incident involved Shigenori Nishikaichi, who was a Japanese fighter pilot, and the inhabitants of the tiny . The tiny island of Niihau was chosen as it was only a 30-minute flight from Pearl Harbor and was believed to be uninhabited

The incident involved Shigenori Nishikaichi, who was a Japanese fighter pilot, and the inhabitants of the tiny island of Niihau. These planes would not be able to safely return to the aircraft carriers and would need a rendezvous point. The tiny island of Niihau was chosen as it was only a 30-minute flight from Pearl Harbor and was believed to be uninhabited. There the fighter pilots could await rescue via submarine. The plan did not work as well as expected for Shigenori Nishikaichi when his plane was damaged in the attack.

I have yet to read another Niihau book on people's lives on the island. On the title of the book, a word "Terrorized" perhaps should not be printed. I feel the pilot started it but I would replace Terrorized to Stirred-Up or Upset. One person found this helpful. I was interested in some of the seldom mentioned events surrounding the Pear Harbor attack. This book certainly contained some!

The Niʻihau incident occurred on December 7–13, 1941, when Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi (西開地 重徳 Nishikaichi Shigenori) crash-landed his Zero on the Hawaiian island of Niʻihau after participating in the attack on Pear.

The Niʻihau incident occurred on December 7–13, 1941, when Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi (西開地 重徳 Nishikaichi Shigenori) crash-landed his Zero on the Hawaiian island of Niʻihau after participating in the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Imperial Japanese Navy had designated Niʻihau as an uninhabited island for damaged aircraft to land and await rescue.

Before the Pearl Harbor attack, tensions between Japan and the United States had been mounting for the .

Before the Pearl Harbor attack, tensions between Japan and the United States had been mounting for the better part of a decade. The island nation of Japan, isolated from the rest of the world for much of its history, embarked on a period of aggressive expansion near the turn of the 20th century. Was Trying to Stop Japan’s Global Expansion.

Niihau Incident book. The true story of a Japanese fighter pilot, who while trying to return to his ship after the Pearl Harbor attack, crash-landed on the American territory of Niihau, Hawaii and terrorized its residents.

The Niihau Incident, by Allan Beekman. The true story of the Japanese fighter pilot who, after the Pearl Harbor attack, crash-landed on the Hawaiian Island of Niihau and terrorized the residents". No Holds Barred: The Compete History of Mixed Martial Arts in America, by Clyde Gentry III. 2011 A history of MMA from the late 1990s and how it became a billion dollar industry.

Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, a Japanese airman named Shigenori Nishikaichi crash landed on Niihau, as planned. Nishikaichi’s plane came down just a few yards away from one of Niihau’s inhabitants, named Hawila Kaleohano

Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, a Japanese airman named Shigenori Nishikaichi crash landed on Niihau, as planned. Nishikaichi’s plane came down just a few yards away from one of Niihau’s inhabitants, named Hawila Kaleohano. Kaleohano, like the other residents of the island, was unaware of the day’s events, but knew that Japan and the United States had been saber-rattling for months. Kaleohano, acting on this information, took the pilot’s weapon and the documents he was carrying before Nishikaichi came to. But the two would be hard-pressed to interact further

The tiny island of Niihau was chosen as it was only a 30-minute flight from Pearl Harbor and was believed to be uninhabited.

The tiny island of Niihau was chosen as it was only a 30-minute flight from Pearl Harbor and was believed to be uninhabited. Japanese Fighter Pilot Who, after Pearl Harbor, Crash-Landed on Hawaiian Island & Terrorized the Residents.

Immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 . Japanese pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi was flying his Mitsubishi Zero over the Pacific.

Immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 - the date that would live in infamy - there began a peculiar and violent episode that has more or less lived in obscurity ever since. The 22-year-old was escorting several bombers that were part of a second wave of attack on Pearl Harbor, with Bellows Field, an Army airbase, as their target. Niihau is the second-smallest and westernmost of the eight major Hawaiian islands. It has remained privately owned and lightly populated since the Robinson family purchased the island from King Kamehameha V in 1864.

Since the Japanese attack was a total surprise, many of the first torpedoes .

Since the Japanese attack was a total surprise, many of the first torpedoes and bombs dropped on the unsuspecting ships hit their targets. The damage done was severe. Although the crews on board each battleship worked feverishly to keep their ship afloat, some were destined to sink. All this damage was done by the Japanese, who suffered very few losses themselves - just 29 aircraft and five midget subs. The United States Enters World War II. The news of the attack on Pearl Harbor quickly spread throughout the United States.

The true story of a Japanese fighter pilot, who while trying to return to his ship after the Pearl Harbor attack, crash-landed on the American territory of Niihau, Hawaii and terrorized its residents.
Stan
I strongly recommend reading the book, as it gives a pretty clear picture of how people can find themselves swayed by their fears and their desires, to do "the wrong thing." The writer seems to place too much of the blame on the racism that the U.S. practiced against the 1st or 2nd generation Japanese at the time. Certainly, the U.S. was a more racist society at the time and it is understandable how that influenced what happened and why it happened, but (IMHO) there is too much sympathy given to the Japanese pilot, Japanese government, and towards Harad, who turned against the U.S.
Kerahuginn
Great telling of a fascinating story I had never heard.
Enone
A magazine article streched into a book. Not a lot of info.
Mori
Fascinating story well told.
Pruster
I find this book exciting to read about real lives that really took place back then before I was born. Maybe it isn't fair that I should be writing this, but I haven't finish reading the entire book yet. I find it very moving how those hawaiian people coped with the problems they had with the pilot. The hawaiian people lived in a quiet peaceful life until that day when the pilot landed. They were simple people and brave. I think the author wrote this book well enough for us to realize the protection this Niihau Island and the people on it need. I respect their rights for the island to be called 'forbidden island' to keep their culture 100%. I was only 17 miles away when I took the picture of Niihau Island from Kauai's Barking Sand beach. The view of the island is beautiful. Perhaps someday I'll come back and visit Niihau, of course, go with the tour boat. I really appreciated the pictures of people and places in the book, plus the map of the locations. I have yet to read another Niihau book on people's lives on the island. On the title of the book, a word "Terrorized" perhaps should not be printed. I feel the pilot started it but I would replace Terrorized to Stirred-Up or Upset.
Urllet
A little bit of Hawaii history that many may not know. I found it to be quite illuminating about the status and beliefs of the citizenry at the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. One is stimulated to think what one would do, as did these citizens of Ni'ihau.
Phenade
This topic is ofthen aluded to in other reads i have done, and it was good to get a more in depth look at it. The writing style though is a bit awkward, almost as if English is a second language, or the editor should have cleaned it up some to make the reading smoother
Interesting story about a small, overlooked portion of a very dramatic day in US history. Well told, although very simply written.