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History
Author: Hilary McD. Beckles
ISBN: 0521678498
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 338 pages
Publisher Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (March 26, 2007)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 969
ePUB size: 1333 kb
FB2 size: 1768 kb
DJVU size: 1683 kb
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eBook A History of Barbados: From Amerindian Settlement to Caribbean Single Market download

by Hilary McD. Beckles


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Sir Hilary McDonald Beckles KA (born 11 August 1955) is a Barbadian historian, he is the current . A History of Barbados: From Amerindian Settlement to Caribbean Single Market, Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Sir Hilary McDonald Beckles KA (born 11 August 1955) is a Barbadian historian, he is the current vice-chancellor of the University of the West Indies (UWI) and chairman of the CARICOM Reparations Committee. Educated at the University of Hull in England, Beckles began his academic career at UWI, and was granted a personal professorship at the age of 37, becoming the youngest in the university's history. Liberties Lost: The Indigenous Caribbean and Slave Systems, with Verene A. Shepherd, Cambridge University Press, 2004.

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Information about the book, A History of Barbados: From Amerindian Settlement to Caribbean Single Market: the Nonfiction, Paperback, by Hilary Beckles (Cambridge University Press, Mar 26, 2007). He presents new insights and analyses key events in a lucid and provocative style which will appeal to all those who have an interest in the island’s past and present.

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He presents new insights and analyses key events in a lucid and provocative style which will appeal to all those who have an interest in the island's past and present.

of Barbados : From Amerindian Settlement to Caribbean Single Market.

A History of Barbados : From Amerindian Settlement to Caribbean Single Market. by Hilary McD. Beckles.

Find nearly any book by Hilary McD Beckles. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers

Find nearly any book by Hilary McD Beckles. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. A History of Barbados: From Amerindian Settlement to Nation-State. ISBN 9780521358798 (978-0-521-35879-8) Softcover, Cambridge University Press, 1990.

Hilary McD Beckles, Hilary Beckles, Beckles Hilary McD. Highly acclaimed when it first appeared in 1990, this general history of Barbados traces the events and ideas that have shaped the collaborative experience of all the islands inhabitants

Hilary McD Beckles, Hilary Beckles, Beckles Hilary McD. Highly acclaimed when it first appeared in 1990, this general history of Barbados traces the events and ideas that have shaped the collaborative experience of all the islands inhabitants. He presents new insights and analyses key events in a lucid and provocative style which will appeal to all those who have an interest in the island's past and present.

Highly acclaimed when it first appeared in 1990, this general history of Barbados traces the events and ideas that have shaped the collaborative experience of all the islands inhabitants. In this second edition, Hilary Beckles updates the text to reflect the considerable number of writings recently published on Barbados. He presents new insights and analyses key events in a lucid and provocative style which will appeal to all those who have an interest in the island's past and present. Using a vigorous approach, Hilary Beckles examines how the influences of the Amerindians, European colonisation, the sugar industry, the African slave trade, emancipation, the civil rights movement, independence in 1966 and nationalism have shaped contemporary Barbados.
Xangeo
This is a careful, thorough history of Barbados. It is a scholarly work in the best sense. It is interesting, thorough, clear and well written. If you are interested in the history of Barbados, as I am, you will be glad you read the book. It covers the entire history of Barbados, with perhaps only recent history being a little short on detail.
Beckles writes with a point of view: the history of Barbados is a struggle between the slaves and later freed people against a monolithic "plantocracy." The book is not particularly good at sorting out currents and cross-currents in developments, instead forcing everything to fit into this this point of view, whether or not the people or the developments really fit.
Beckles has no capability of seeing the history of Barbados from the viewpoint of people who were not slaves, whether they are rich English people or poor Irish people. People from both of these groups were in Barbados for hundreds of years, in fact they were in Barbados before African slavery. He mentions in passing that many of these people left Barbados in the last half of the twentieth century, without discussing either the number who left or the underlying reasons or implications.
The observations in the book related to economics are simply dreadful. I am a professional economist, so this probably is a bigger deal to me than you unless you are an economist, but Beckles has no grasp of basic economics. Beckles presents simplistic answers when the results of thoughtful analysis would be informative.
The discussion of population and emigration is particularly poor. He sees emigration as all bad. It is hard for those leaving. Still, Beckles does not seem to realize that emigration raised the wages of those remaining in Barbados. He does seem to realize that small peasant holdings did not come into existence in Barbados precisely because the land was productive in producing cash crops on large farms or plantations. Still, rather than examine whether smallholdings were quite unlikely no matter who owned the land when slavery was abolished and what might have happened instead, Beckles blames the evil plantocracy for getting in the way of the former slaves' aspirations and leaves it at that.
This is easily the most careful and thorough history of Barbados available. It is the best place to get the actual developments, even though you will not get a good understanding of why they happened.
I highly recommend it.
FireWater
This is a great book that shows the love one man has for his island. More than being written by a capable scholar with a clear and direct prose style, Hilary Beckles impresses on the reader that recounting a comprehensive history of one's birthplace is not just an academic endeavor, but an act of love and solidarity with the people. I read the first edition but, seeing as that there is already a second, I would imagine that Dr. Beckles has expanded his notion of history as evinced within the concept of Barbados. If a study leaves the reader wanting more, then this is great, since it connotes that one can never fully comprehend what it is one loves so much. Knowledge forever expands. I owe Dr. Beckles the thought that Barbados is an "islandwide community," for it has impacted my academic pursuits and a notion of a world mindframe. Oneness.
Fani
I was hoping for more Pirates and lusty maidens. I read this book in preparation for Cropover in Barbados. I was hoping to develop an appreciation for the History of the place before I went down there. I envisioned daily field trips to historical places before feting the night away in willful abandon. I stayed at a hotel not 500 Meters from the George Washington house. Well, the book was OK. The Cropover was Fantastic. If I saw something historic, it was through my Scotch Goggles. I would recommend Cropover. This book not so much. However, it's not a bad book. If you are crazy about Barbados, you should have it on your shelf. If you are simply curious about Barbados, OK, get the book. If you enjoy a good slave uprising, and we all do, spoiler alert...it's in this book. Do not bother to bring this book to Cropover though unless you intend to simply use it as a coaster.
Lcena
This is the one book I turned to when I decided to put pen to paper for my historic novel. No work of history or even of fiction that is focused on Barbados (or even on the greater Caribbean) can claim authenticity without referring to this book by Sir Hilary Beckles.