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History
Author: Neil MacKinnon
ISBN: 0773507191
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 244 pages
Publisher McGill-Queen's University Press; 1 edition (January 1, 1989)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 561
ePUB size: 1739 kb
FB2 size: 1469 kb
DJVU size: 1747 kb
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eBook This Unfriendly Soil: The Loyalist Experience in Nova Scotia, 1783-1791 download

by Neil MacKinnon


United Empire loyalists - Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia - History - 1784-1867.

United Empire loyalists - Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia - History - 1784-1867. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books.

This Unfriendly Soil book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. This Unfriendly Soil: The Loyalist Experience In Nova Scotia,.

Loyalists in Nova Scotia hoped that their anticipated prosperity, to be achieved with British aid, would show . Not all of the loyalists experienced failure.

Loyalists in Nova Scotia hoped that their anticipated prosperity, to be achieved with British aid, would show that the American rebellion had been a terrible m. .Published by: McGill-Queen's University Press. Many of the refugees had come simply to get what they could in free land and provisions and then, having received and disposed of those, they drifted away. They had achieved their goal in Nova Scotia.

Loyalists in Nova Scotia hoped that their anticipated prosperity, to be achieved with British aid, would show that . Recently Viewed and Featured. This unfriendly soil: The Loyalist experience in Nova Scotia, 1783-1791.

Loyalists in Nova Scotia hoped that their anticipated prosperity, to be achieved with British aid, would show that the American rebellion had been a terrible. Economics: A Guide for the Financial Markets. Take as Directed: Your Prescription for Safe Health Care in Canada.

Half-title: Loyalist in Nova Scotia. Thesis - Queen's University, 1975. Bibliography: leaves 539-552. Canadian theses on microfiche. Loyalist in Nova Scotia. Microfiche of typescript. Ottawa: National Library of Canada, 1976. 6 sheet(s), 1. x 1. cm. - (Canadian theses on microfiche, no. 24856).

Title: THIS UNFRIENDLY SOIL : The Loyalist. Publisher: McGill - Queen's University Press, Kingston. Publication Date: 1986.

Bibliographic Details. Title: THIS UNFRIENDLY SOIL : The Loyalist.

This Unfriendly Soil: The Loyalist Experience in Nova Scotia, 1783-1791. reprint U. of Toronto Press, 1992. McGill-Queen's U. Press, 1986. Loyalists in Nova Scotia hoped that their anticipated prosperity, to be achieved with British aid, would show that the American rebellion had been a terrible mistake. But prosperity was elusive. The loyalists were disappointed not only by their treatment at the hands of the British government - their reluctant benefactor - but also by the apparent unwillingness of the government and the people of Nova Scotia to recognise their sacrifice and encourage their advancement.

United Empire Loyalists. American Loyalists Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia History. More about the author(s): Neil Mackinnon was born in 1938. Download more by: Neil Mackinnon. Find and Load Ebook This unfriendly soil.

Loyalists in Nova Scotia hoped that their anticipated prosperity, to be achieved with British aid, would show that the American rebellion had been a terrible mistake. But prosperity was elusive. The loyalists were disappointed not only by their treatment at the hands of the British government - their reluctant benefactor - but also by the apparent unwillingness of the government and the people of Nova Scotia to recognise their sacrifice and encourage their advancement. This sense of opposition from the existing community made their experience different from that of loyalists elsewhere and contributed to the intensity and longevity of Nova Scotia's loyalist tradition. The early period of loyalist settlement came to a close shortly after Britain gained portable pensions and withdrew free provisions, a turn of events which led many of the exiles to return to their homeland. By 1791 relations with the old settlers and the provincial government, changing attitudes toward the United States, and conflict among themselves had modified loyalist opinions and expectations in ways they would never have imagined a decade earlier.