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History
Author: Colin G. Calloway,N. Bruce Duthu
ISBN: 0670018570
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 304 pages
Publisher Viking Adult; First Edition edition (January 31, 2008)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 198
ePUB size: 1338 kb
FB2 size: 1113 kb
DJVU size: 1483 kb
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eBook American Indians and the Law: The Penguin Library of American Indian History download

by Colin G. Calloway,N. Bruce Duthu


In addition to authoring American Indians and the Law and Shadow Nations, he has also contributed . Colin Calloway is a British American historian.

Colin Calloway is a British American historian. He is the John Kimball, Jr. 1943 Professor of History and a professor of Native American Studies at Dartmouth College. Series: The Penguin Library of American Indian History.

The history and politics of American Indians’ unique constitutional status from a renowned scholar. Few Americans know that Indian tribes have a legal status unique among America’s distinct racial and ethnic groups: They are also sovereign governments that engage in governmental relations with Congress.

In addition to authoring American Indians and the Law and Shadow Nations, he has also contributed .

and the Law : The Penguin Library of American Indian History This is a must read for anyone who has an interest in this aspect of our history and concerns about the future direction this nation may take with regard.

American Indians and the Law : The Penguin Library of American Indian History. A perfect introduction to a vital subject very few Americans understand-the constitutional status of American Indians Few American s know that Indian tribes have a legal status unique among America's distinct racial and ethnic groups: they are sovereign governments who engage in relations with Congress. This is a must read for anyone who has an interest in this aspect of our history and concerns about the future direction this nation may take with regard to the legal status and rights of Native Americans in our democratic society.

Colin Gordon Calloway (born 1953) is a British American historian. 2004 Merle Curti Award. 2004 Caughey Western History Association Prize. 2005 Ray Allen Billington Prize. 2014 Honorary Doctorate from University of Lucerne. National Book Award for Nonfiction shortlist for The Indian World of George Washington.

N. Bruce Duthu, JD, is an internationally recognized scholar on Native American issues, including tribal sovereignty and federal recognition of Indian tribes. He is a professor of law at the Vermont Law School and a United Houma Indian Nation tribal member. From Publishers Weekly

Penguin group USA. Ww. enguin. Penguin library of american indian history.

Penguin group USA. Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier. Duthu’s intellectual honesty and compassionate message give a strong voice to our sovereign neighbors who are all too often forgotten or ignored in today’s political arena.

American Indians and the law by N. Bruce Duthu. Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi by Timothy R. Pauketat. The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears by Theda Perdue. Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of the Community (Penguin Library of American Indian History) by Brenda J. Child. Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher.

A history and political evaluation of the unique constitutional status of Native Americans profiles their sovereign government process and relationship with Congress, describing the complex legal disputes associated with the self-rule of Native tribes as reflected in landmark cases from the past two centuries. 20,000 first printing.
Mmsa
This book tells the story of how our governent, its legilative bodies and Supreme Court, has dealt with the Indian population whose land we claimed by way of "The Discovery Doctrine." The story is not an easy read because it demonstrates our discomfort in living into American ideals, but the clarity with which Bruce Duthu writes invites the reader to stay with it and possibly finds ways to address in our own time the inconsistencies and the damages our government has wrought.
Frdi
I chose "American Indians and the Law" as a follow-up for another in the Viking/Penguin series ("The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears"). Both are well worth reading. They leave me with the question--is it a comfort or a sorrow to learn that politics have often twisted justice throughout the history of the United States?
sergant
The author has presented a very reasonable and well-documented view of the legal challengess faced by Native Americans when trying to maintain their tribal identities and sovereign rights within the restraints of state and federal laws as legislated and as interpreted by the courts, the U.S. Supreme Court in particular. This is a must read for anyone who has an interest in this aspect of our history and concerns about the future direction this nation may take with regard to the legal status and rights of Native Americans in our democratic society.
Golkree
I learned that tribal legal status began as sovereign [self-government] that differed from that of other cultural groups predating the establishment of the US. In Johnson v McIntosh (1823), the Supreme Court applied the 'discovery doctrine' meaning that American Indians became guests in their ancestral lands. Later in that century, Congress subsumed American Indian sovereignty into the scope of national power. Johnson v McIntosh is the most important Indian rights opinion ever issued by any court of law in the United States (73)." Although American Indians became citizens (1924), they remained subject to the authority of Congress. The persistence of racism appears in many Indian cases and policies.
Hono
Good