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History
Author: Kurt Borchard
ISBN: 0874177235
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 272 pages
Publisher University of Nevada Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2007)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 939
ePUB size: 1615 kb
FB2 size: 1369 kb
DJVU size: 1794 kb
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eBook The Word On The Street: Homeless Men In Las Vegas download

by Kurt Borchard


He also elicits the men's own perceptions of the causes and consequences of homelessness, as well as their views on the city's homeless policies.

Just beyond Las Vegas’s neon and fantasy live thousands of homeless people, most of them me. Borchard allows his subjects to speak so that the reader can gain insight into what it is like to be homeless in Las Vegas

Just beyond Las Vegas’s neon and fantasy live thousands of homeless people, most of them men. To the millions of visitors who come to Las Vegas each year to enjoy its gambling and entertainment. Borchard allows his subjects to speak so that the reader can gain insight into what it is like to be homeless in Las Vegas. Given the elite perspective of much literature on homelessness, this is a remarkable thing to achieve. American Anthropologist.

Varat lejupielādēt grāmatu Homeless in Las Vegas: Stories from the .

Varat lejupielādēt grāmatu Homeless in Las Vegas: Stories from the Street lasīšanai bezsaistē un iezīmēt tekstu, pievienot grāmatzīmes vai veikt piezīmes lasīšanas laikā. Kurt Borchard is a professor in the Department of Sociology, Geography, and Earth Science at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

1 online resource (xxvi, 241 pages, pages of plates) : Includes bibliographical references (pages 225-232) and index

1 online resource (xxvi, 241 pages, pages of plates) : Includes bibliographical references (pages 225-232) and index. Popular interpretations of homelessness - Talking to one homeless man in Las Vegas - Causes and consequences of homelessness - Homeless shelters and squatting on the strip - Other survival strategies - Crime, violence, and the police - Recent developments - The word on the street. Print version record.

Just beyond Las Vegas's neon and fantasy live thousands of homeless people, most of them men. To the millions of visitors who come to Las Vegas each year to enjoy its gambling and entertainment, the city's homeless people are largely invisible, segregated from tourist areas because it's good business.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. The Word On The Street: Homeless Men In Las Vegas.

Homeless Men in Las Vegas. Published September 2007 by University of Nevada Press. Homeless men, SOCIAL SCIENCE, Poverty & Homelessness. Male homelessness is often interpreted as an individual, rather than a social, problem.

The names of the organizations were examined, and those with names that referenced specific religions or contained words connoting religiosity were designated as "faith based. The goal of the project was to develop a better understanding of homeless youths’ conceptions of and engagements with citizenship and democracy, and ultimately to co-design an advocacy.

Library descriptions

Library descriptions. In The Word on the Street, sociologist Kurt Borchard examines homelessness in Las Vegas from the perspectives of the city administration, the media, and especially of the homeless men themselves.

Just beyond Las Vegas’s neon and fantasy live thousands of homeless people, most of them men. To the millions of visitors who come to Las Vegas each year to enjoy its gambling and entertainment, the city’s homeless people are largely invisible, segregated from tourist areas because it’s “good business.” Now, through candid discussions with homeless men, analysis of news reports, and years of fieldwork, Kurt Borchard reveals the lives and desperation of men without shelter in Las Vegas.

Borchard’s account offers a graphic, disturbing, and profoundly moving picture of life on Las Vegas’s streets, depicting the strategies that homeless men employ in order to survive, from the search for a safe place to sleep at night to the challenges of finding food, maintaining personal hygiene, and finding an acceptable place to rest during a long day on the street.

That such misery and desperation exist in the midst of Las Vegas’s hedonistic tourist economy and booming urban development is a cruel irony, according to the author, and it threatens the city’s future as a prime tourist destination. The book will be of interest to social workers, sociologists, anthropologists, politicians, and all those concerned about changing the misery on the street.

blac wolf
Absolutely heartbreaking. I used to vehemently refuse to give a couple dollars to those who looked like they were addicts/alcoholics. After reading this, I don't begrudge them their means of escape from living on the street. I can now see that all of them need to drink/drug, especially at night, to be able to sleep on some steps. Sleep doesn't come easily and they are constantly awaken by police and/or robbed. Horrible life they lead. Not all who are homeless became homeless due to their addictions, some just can't get the help they need because the government and or the VA uses tactics so complicated so as to make the claimant so frustrated they quit trying to get the benefits for which they qualify. Such a setup on the part of these agencies.
Dusho
Male homeless is often interpreted as an individual, rather than a social problem. US. values and beliefs stress indivdualism, which lulls communities into thinking their people are not vulnerable. This is further reinforced by the ADA and Civil Rights Acts. Additional relevant values include competition, and equating hard work with virtue.

What is not so much taken into account is that it is becoming increasingly difficult to afford shelter as well as food, and medical care - especially dental.

Borchard interviewed 48 homeless people, and two service providers.

Predisposing factors - disability, lack of available/receptive relatives and friends, drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, and prior imprisonment. Quantifying each contributor, however, is difficult Las Vegas adds another contributing factor - addiction to gambling.

Some of the homeless prefer living on the street instead of in a shelter - avoid the rules, dislike of the food, unsanitary conditions.