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History
Author: Dan Barry
ISBN: 031236718X
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 320 pages
Publisher St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (October 30, 2007)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 285
ePUB size: 1563 kb
FB2 size: 1814 kb
DJVU size: 1702 kb
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eBook City Lights: Stories About New York download

by Dan Barry


Dan Barry wrote the weekly column About New York for The New York Times from June 2003 to November 2006, and now writes a national column for the Times called This Land.

Dan Barry wrote the weekly column About New York for The New York Times from June 2003 to November 2006, and now writes a national column for the Times called This Land. Then came sunlight, and tall buildings, and quiet. Andrew Parsons, a sousaphone player from Alabama, had made it to the show. City lights: stories about new york.

Электронная книга "City Lights: Stories About New York", Dan Barry

Электронная книга "City Lights: Stories About New York", Dan Barry. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "City Lights: Stories About New York" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Dan Barry is a longtime reporter and columnist for The New York Times. He is the author of five books, including "This Land: America, Lost and Found, a collection of his national columns for The Times that was published in 2018

Dan Barry is a longtime reporter and columnist for The New York Times. He is the author of five books, including "This Land: America, Lost and Found, a collection of his national columns for The Times that was published in 2018. Barry, whose father was from Brooklyn and whose mother was from County Galway, Ireland, was born in Queens, . and raised in Deer Park, . He graduated from St. Anthony’s High School (now in Huntington, .

With a poet’s clear eye and a journalist’s curiosity about how a city works, Dan Barry shows us New York as no other writer has seen it. Evocative, intimate, piercing, and often funny, the essays in City Lights capture everyday life in the city at its most ordinary and extraordinary. Wandering the city as a columnist for The New York Times, Barry visits the denizens of the With a poet’s clear eye and a journalist’s curiosity about how a city works, Dan Barry shows us New York as no other writer has seen it.

Two new collections by reporters for The New York Times, Dan Barry and Joseph Berger, showcase the poignant and inspiring, funny and heartbreaking stories of everyday life in the five . Stories About New York.

Two new collections by reporters for The New York Times, Dan Barry and Joseph Berger, showcase the poignant and inspiring, funny and heartbreaking stories of everyday life in the five boroughs. Both writers grew up in the New York area and retain affectionate memories dating back more than four decades.

Each story in City Lights illuminates New York, as it was and as it is: always changing, always losing and . Dan Barry wrote the weekly column "About New York" for The New York Times from June 2003 to November 2006, and now writes a national column for the Times called "This Land.

Each story in City Lights illuminates New York, as it was and as it is: always changing, always losing and renewing parts of itself, every street corner an opportunity for surprise and revelation.

After all, New York City is one of the most (maybe the most) iconic city in. .Here are 11 of the best nonfiction books about New York City.

Here are 11 of the best nonfiction books about New York City.

Each story in City Lights illuminates New York, as it was and as it is: always changing, always losing and renewing parts of itself, every street . His stories leave readers amused, horrified and enlightened, but most of all appreciative.

Dan Barry is an award-winning columnist and reporter for The New York Times and the author of five books .

Dan Barry is an award-winning columnist and reporter for The New York Times and the author of five books, including the forthcoming This Land: America, Lost a.d Found, to be published by Black Dog & Leventhal in early September 2018. This Land is a curated collection of Barry’s work as a wandering national columnist for the New York Times. He has also written Pull Me Up: A Memoir ; City Lights: Stories About New York, which is a collection of his About New York columns; and Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball’s Longest Game, which received the 2012 PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing.

Dan Barry writes about New York as if it was a village.

With a poet’s clear eye and a journalist’s curiosity about how a city works, Dan Barry shows us New York as no other writer has seen it.Evocative, intimate, piercing, and often funny, the essays in City Lights capture everyday life in the city at its most ordinary and extraordinary. Wandering the city as a columnist for The New York Times, Barry visits the denizens of the Fulton Fish Market on the eve of its closing; journeys with an obsessed guide through the secret underground of abandoned subway stops, tunnels, and aqueducts; touches down in bars, hospitals, churches, diners, pools, zoos, memorabilia-stuffed apartments, at births and funerals, the places where people gather, are welcomed, or depart; talks to the ex-athlete who caught the falling baby, the performance artist who works as a mermaid, the octogenarian dancers who find quiet joy in their partnership, and the guy who waves flags over the Cross-Bronx Expressway to wish drivers safe passage. Along the way, Barry offers glimpses of New York’s distant and recent past. He explains why the dust-coated wishbones hanging above the bar at McSorley’s Old Ale House belong to the doughboy ghosts of World War I. He recalls a century of grandeur at the Plaza Hotel throught the tales of longtime doormen who will soon be out of a job. He finds that an old man’s quiet death opens back into a past that the man had spent his life denying. And, from the vantage of the Circle Line cruise around Manhattan, he joins tourists as they try to make sense of still-smoldering ruins in Lower Manhattan three weeks after September 11, 2001.Each story in City Lights illuminates New York, as it was and as it is: always changing, always losing and renewing parts of itself, every street corner an opportunity for surprise and revelation.
Kison
good condition
Maman
Best purchase I've made so far!
Nafyn
As a native of NJ/NY I found this book boring and depressing. It's a very poor compilation of stories about NYC, not well written and with no redeeming features
By mistake I unfortunately ordered two of them and can't think of a single person I can give the second one to as a gift. The only thing I can say for it is
that it didn't cost very much and the cover is attractive.
Shazel
Dan Barry writes about New York as if it was a village. Its size is not as important as the individuals who live there, the people who inhabit it, make it the alive, vibrant and wonderfully alluring city it is.

This is not about New York, the city. It is about the flesh and blood of the city, about the people and characters of the city, and it's hard to imagine a city anywhere that has more characters and color to write about than New York City. Dan Barry does a good job of capturing their individuality, their uniquenss and their inevitable ties and bonds to the city.

Obviously, this review is written by an unabashed lover of NYC...and from Alabama, too.
Zargelynd
It's the Sunday before Christmas. First thing this morning, pre-coffee, pre-bowel movement/ablutions, pre-church, I went into the front yard to retrieve my copy of the New York Times. I knew the pages would be filled with column after column of depressing dispatches from Darfur, Wichita, Whereveristan, mass homicide, sub-prime scandal, suicide bombing, official doublespeak about why torture is a crime except when practiced by CIA/Blackwater, the inexhaustible ineptitude/fathomless arrogance of the Bush administration, and opposing platitudes/feckless fulminations by Frank Rich.
God's mercy on us all.
I didn't rescue the Times from pelting rain and soot-ridden snow, however, in order to batter my wounded/aged soul with the alarming/ deteriorating condition/direction of our country/world. My intent was to turn immediately to Dan Barry's latest report from the homeland/ hinterland and to see what redeeming/enlightening observations had come from the pen/laptop/PC of the single-most powerful, poetic, sublime columnist at work at this moment in these Disunited/Dispirited States. (And, caveat lector, Dan Barry is not to be confused with satirist Dave Barry.)
I wasn't disappointed by what I read. One again, I was amazed. (I almost wrote "astounded," except that the end piece in the NYT Book Review of several months ago by Joe Quinlan--a satirist every bit as good as Dave Barry and a lot more savage--has rendered that word verboten by anyone attempting a review.) Here in the face of yet another merciless deadline, Dan Barry had managed to pinpoint a revealing angle on a familiar story (check it out for yourself, "A Place Just like Every Other Place. Only Not," 12/23/07) and produce a precisely chiseled, exquisitely faceted journalistic gem of finely cut reporting and lyrically evocative writing.
My original introduction to Dan Barry's writing was in his "About New York" columns, a selection of which is reproduced in his newest book, CITY LIGHTS. Barry's predecessors in this spot included the newspaper equivalent of Gerhig/Ruth or Mantle/Maris (Yankee fans, take your pick)--the inimitable Meyer Berger and the nonpareil Francis X. Clines. Barry has not only matched their achievement but set a whole new standard, producing column after column that exposes/celebrates/ investigates/ mourns/explores the incessant/inexhaustible tragedy/comedy/ soap opera/ burlesque/masque that unfolds in New York each and every day.
I'm sure that I read every single column in CITY LIGHTS when it first appeared in the Times. But as I read and re-read this book, I'm astounded (sorry, Joe Quinlan) anew by how utterly fresh/invariably perceptive/carefully observed each and every article is. Years from now, this book will be taught in journalism schools (if such institutions still exist) and devoured by historians (if such a profession still exists) interested in what life was really like in New York during the first decade of the 21st century. Those who are neither collectors nor teachers nor historians will simply keep it by their bedsides, reading it over again, a story at a time, to remind themselves of the dignity/ intensity/complexity of life as lived by Gotham's extraordinary/ ordinary people.
Attention book collectors: At some point, Dan Barry will be awarded the Pulitzer Prize--why he didn't get it for his reporting from New Orleans on the consequences on Katrina, eludes me--which will make this book especially valuable. Non-collectors also take notice. If you simply love great writing, buy this book. If you're fascinated by New York, buy this book. If you're bewitched/bothered/intrigued by the human condition, buy this book. And if none of the above categories applies, but you love to read anything by Alice McDermott, buy this book. Her introduction is worth the price of admission. CITY LIGHTS will endure as long as New York does.(And if journalism ain't your cup of tea but you want to imbibe THE BEST memoir to come out of suburban New York, get a copy of Barry's PULL ME UP.) Thank you, Dan Barry.
artman
Whenever I read the NY Times over the past few years and became despairing of the state of the world and humanity, I always knew I could turn to Dan Barry to "pull me up." Barry's collection of columns are really prose poems, filled with soul and spirit of the Hidden New York City: cello playing bus drivers, workin' stiffs, everyday Janes and Joes, whose lives Barry illuminates with a style that is a pleasure to read again and again. These columns were my daily vitamins. Rereading them in this collection is truly a revelation that the spirit of the common people is what gives NY and America its uncommon soul. Buy this book. Then buy another and give it to a friend. Read it and feel renewed. It will "pull you up" too.