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eBook Sexual Revolution in Early America (Gender Relations in the American Experience) download
History
Author: Richard Godbeer
ISBN: 0801878918
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 448 pages
Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press (February 18, 2004)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 401
ePUB size: 1890 kb
FB2 size: 1156 kb
DJVU size: 1960 kb
Other formats: lrf mbr rtf mobi

eBook Sexual Revolution in Early America (Gender Relations in the American Experience) download

by Richard Godbeer


The book has much to offer both the casual and the thoughtful reader.

The book has much to offer both the casual and the thoughtful reader. Evan Haefeli Washington Times). has clear implications for feminist literary scholars and queer theorists who focus on questions of agency and transgression.

Gender Relations in the American Experience). These depictions of colonial North America's sexual culture sharply contradict the stereotype of Puritanical abstinence that persists in the popular imagination. In Sexual Revolution in Early America, Richard Godbeer boldly overturns conventional wisdom about the sexual values and customs of colonial Americans.

Part of the Gender Relations in the American Experience Series). Godbeer also explores Anglo-Indian sexual relations and post-revolutionary mores.

The payoff in Sexual Revolution in Early America lies in the details.

In 1695, John Miller, a clergyman traveling through New York, found it appalling that so many couples lived together without ever being married and that no one viewed "ante-nuptial fornication" as anything scandalous or sinful. Charles Woodmason, an Anglican minister in South Carolina in 1766, described the region as a "stage of debauchery" in which polygamy was "very common," "concubinage general," and "bastardy no disrepute.

Richard Godbeer's book on sexuality in colonial British America has been . The book documents more than one sexual revolution in early America.

Richard Godbeer's book on sexuality in colonial British America has been eagerly awaited by those of us who had heard or read parts of this project in conference papers or articles. His full study, published in May 2002, has lived up to its promise. Sexual customs of early modern Britons allowed for sexual intimacy between betrothed and for the recognition of long-standing relationships without a marriage ceremony.

These depictions of colonial North America's sexual culture sharply contradict the stereotype of Puritanical abstinence that persists in the popular imagination.

How did American attitudes toward female sexuality evol. What role did sexual assault play in the conquest of America? How did American attitudes toward female sexuality evolve, and how was sexuality regulated in the early Republic? Sex and sexuality have always been the subject of much attention, both scholarly and popular.

In 1695, John Miller, a clergyman traveling through New York, found it appalling that so many couples lived together without ever being married and that no one viewed "ante-nuptial fornication" as anything scandalous or sinful. Charles Woodmason, an Anglican minister in South Carolina in 1766, described the region as a "stage of debauchery" in which polygamy was "very common," "concubinage general," and "bastardy no disrepute." These depictions of colonial North America's sexual culture sharply contradict the stereotype of Puritanical abstinence that persists in the popular imagination.

In Sexual Revolution in Early America, Richard Godbeer boldly overturns conventional wisdom about the sexual values and customs of colonial Americans. His eye-opening historical account spans two centuries and most of British North America, from New England to the Caribbean, exploring the social, political, and legal dynamics that shaped a diverse sexual culture. Drawing on exhaustive research into diaries, letters, and other private papers, as well as legal records and official documents, Godbeer's absorbing narrative uncovers a persistent struggle between the moral authorities and the widespread expression of popular customs and individual urges.

Godbeer begins with a discussion of the complex attitude that the Puritans had toward sexuality. For example, although believing that sex could be morally corrupting, they also considered it to be such an essential element of a healthy marriage that they excommunicated those who denied "conjugal fellowship" to their spouses. He next examines the ways in which race and class affected the debate about sexual mores, from anxieties about Anglo-Indian sexual relations to the sense of sexual entitlement that planters held over their African slaves. He concludes by detailing the fundamental shift in sexual culture during the eighteenth century towards the acceptance of a more individualistic concept of sexual desire and fulfillment. Today's moral critics, in their attempts to convince Americans of the social and spiritual consequences of unregulated sexual behavior, often harken back to a more innocent age; as this groundbreaking work makes clear, America's sexual culture has always been rich, vibrant, and contentious.

Rolling Flipper
Interesting book into the sexual practices of various colonial groups in Early America. Gave me a whole new perspective on the Puritans and the role of sex in their daily lives. Very interesting read and a much different approach than a traditional history book
Ffyan
Good
Faell
The title's reference to a sexual revolution may be somewhat of a misnomer, but Godbeer provides exceptional insight into what Puritans thought, said and did sexually. Godbeer provides ample evidence to debunk the view of Puritans is the dour uptight anti-sexual stereotype, a view largely created in the 19th century by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The Puritans explicitly rejected the "Papist" viewpoint that sex was evil and should only be done for procreation. Godbeer also explores Anglo-Indian sexual relations and post-revolutionary mores.

Godbeer shows that the sexuality of early Americans was far more complex than the barren stereotypes suggest.
Nto
This is a very readable and yet sophisticated look at what early Americans thought about sex. It covers the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, also ranges from New England through the southern colonies. It's full of insightful comments about attitudes to gender as well as sex, including what we now call homosexuality and the links between religious belief and sexual values. The author recognizes his debt to earlier scholars (despite what the other reviewer writes), but contributes much that is new and important to our knowledge of this topic. A great read and an important book!