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eBook Bitters in the Honey: Tales of Hope and Disappointment Across Divides of Race and Time download
History
Author: Beth Roy
ISBN: 1557285535
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 400 pages
Publisher Univ of Arkansas Pr; First Edition edition (October 1, 1999)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 524
ePUB size: 1882 kb
FB2 size: 1135 kb
DJVU size: 1313 kb
Other formats: lrf doc lrf mbr

eBook Bitters in the Honey: Tales of Hope and Disappointment Across Divides of Race and Time download

by Beth Roy


I’ve just read Beth Roy’s Bitters in the Honey, about the integration of Little Rock’s Central High School in September 1957.

I’ve just read Beth Roy’s Bitters in the Honey, about the integration of Little Rock’s Central High School in September 1957. It’s primarily a retrospective look, consisting mostly of Beth’s interviews, 40 years after the event, with the white and Black students, as well as school and political figures, who had been there. This is a stunning book, impressive in several ways. First, the book’s idea is itself both obvious and brilliant. No one else thought of finding and reaching out to these people

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Understanding desegregation across the divide of race. Those seriously interested in eliminating racism and making our society representative of it's famous constitutional creed, must read Beth Roy's "Bitters in the Honey. com User, February 22, 2005. In this excellent book, Beth Roy examines the lives of whites and blacks who attended Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1958 - the tumultuous year of Central High's desegregation. Roy interviews several adults, black and white, who were students at Central High School-Little Rock, Ark. during the school desegration of 1957-58.

how emotion and beliefs, individual memory and community discourse work to translate social structures of power into the dynamics that shape race relations in America today" (p. 17). By drawing upon oral history interviews that largely focus on white people who were students at Central High School at the time it was desegregated, Roy finds that white attitudes have changed little with respect to racial issues.

Bitters in the Honey. Tales of Hope and Disappointment Across Divides of Race and Time. by Beth Roy. Published October 1999 by University of Arkansas Press.

Beth Roy. Bitters in the Honey: Tales of Hope and Disappointment Across Divides of Race and Time. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1999.

Bitters in the Honey: Tales of Hope and Disappointment across Divides of Race and Time. Beth Roy. ISBN: 1557285543. Get started today for free.

Roy's findings illustrate important theoretical issues in psychology and sociology, and her conclusions will greatly interest students of. .

Roy's findings illustrate important theoretical issues in psychology and sociology, and her conclusions will greatly interest students of ethnic/race relations, conflict resolution, the sociology of violence, agrarian society, and South Asia. Beth Roy lived in India from 1965 to 1972 and has returned frequently. The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are. Alan W. Watts.

sergant
In this excellent book, Beth Roy examines the lives of whites and blacks who attended Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1958 - the tumultuous year of Central High's desegregation. Drawing on life histories with former high school students, Roy paints a complicated and layered picture of understanding, and more importantly, misunderstanding between whites and blacks across time - the interviews were done 30 years later - and across racial difference. I use this book in course I teach on the history of affirmative action in 20th Century America - and my undergraduate students respond strongly to this book. Some are quite surprised by the white students misperceptions about the black students who came to Central High and their seeming indifference to the experiences of black students. Others are upset, even angry by this indifference. And, still others are embarassed as they read their own feelings into the life histories of the participants. It is also terrific for teaching about the dilemma of memory in reconstructing life histories. Roy demonstrates how the people she interviewed often unwittingly reconstruct their stories of the past to fit present day narratives and understandings or race, race relations, and "white victimization." Rather than dismiss their accounts as "untrue," however, she uses these examples to understand why her interviewees tell stories that diverge from actual accounts written at the time of desegregation. In all, this is a terrific book and a terrific read. I highly recommend it.
Uttegirazu
Ms. Roy does an excellent job in writing this book in an unbiased way. Bitters in the Honey highlights how individual perceptions of any given situation are based not only on actual events, but also how these same individual perceptions are highly inflenced by the larger society. People tend to remember things as they perceived them and as there cohorts remember them. It is always easier to go with the flow. However, we all have a role to play in history. What role we choose to play depends on the choices we make. If we, as Americans, truly want to continue to believe in "The American Dream" changes have to be made in our collective thinking. We are all in this together. The owners of the wealth in this country don't want to share that wealth. They don't care how they earn that wealth (ie on the backs of slaves,betting on mortgages to fail, deregulating Wallstreet, etc.) They don't care how they hold on to that wealth. Keeping people in an "us against them" mindset allows the powers that be to control the rest of us much more easily. I am going to recommend this book to all of my family and friends. It is very thought provoking. This should be required reading for everyone. Make that change!
Nilador
Those seriously interested in eliminating racism and making our society representative of it's famous constitutional creed, must read Beth Roy's "Bitters in the Honey." Roy interviews several adults, black and white, who were students at Central High School-Little Rock, Ark. during the school desegration of 1957-58. Roy clearly points out how the priviledged white students perceived the move towards equality as infringing on their rights, thus making them victims. While the nine black students-the true victims-, the martyrs for positive change, had to withstand constant harassment and acts of violence by angry white students. Even more pathetic, Roy describes how the white students blame the monumental court decision for them not reaching their expected goals in life. Blame, responsibility, guilt, denial are common themes expressed by the white adults, who unknowingly had the power to affect change that would in turn, empower everyone. This book should be on the Oprah Book List, because until serious discussion about race relations is undertaken between people, there will continue to be two victims: the hater and the hated. And this society will continue to weaken from divisiveness.
Feri
I’ve just read Beth Roy’s Bitters in the Honey, about the integration of Little Rock’s Central High School in September 1957. It’s primarily a retrospective look, consisting mostly of Beth’s interviews, 40 years after the event, with the white and Black students, as well as school and political figures, who had been there.

This is a stunning book, impressive in several ways. First, the book’s idea is itself both obvious and brilliant. No one else thought of finding and reaching out to these people. Second, the work of finding them in Arkansas and as far away as Atlanta and Washington was not nothing. Third, Roy’s prose style -- warm, plain-spoken, sometimes personal, sometimes analytical – is surprisingly engaging. Fourth, her account of herself in the introduction as a Jewish liberal who went to a segregated high school in Texas helps establish her perspective. Fifth and most importantly, her ability to listen respectfully to all the people she interviewed is deeply satisfying. Her interviewees find they can trust her and as a result are candid beyond what might be expected. Sixth, what is revealed is how social class, gender, and sexuality affected the anxieties, suspicions, hostility they felt at the time – and some of their mistaken memories. One point that is relevant today is how the whites felt their status was threatened by the Blacks’ change in status. Another is that the white leaders, like Gov. Faubus, were motivated by personal and political considerations but not by principle.