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History
Author: Gay Talese
ISBN: 0679410961
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 448 pages
Publisher Knopf; First Edition edition (April 25, 2006)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 373
ePUB size: 1867 kb
FB2 size: 1832 kb
DJVU size: 1964 kb
Other formats: azw mbr lrf mobi

eBook A Writer's Life download

by Gay Talese


Gay Talese still has a zest for his craft.

Gay Talese still has a zest for his craft. illuminates the craftwork, the tenacity, the drive of one of America’s finest chroniclers. For anyone who is dissatisfied with the tiresome prose of pompous bloggers or who nurses ambitions to write disciplined, lyrical, insightful profiles instead of relying strictly on the five W’s, or who swoons to good writing and is curious about how it’s done, A Writer’s Life will make a great read. St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The inner workings of a writer’s life, the interplay between experience and writing, are brilliantly recounted by a master of the art. Gay Talese now focuses on his own life-the zeal for the truth.

The classic inside story of The New York Times, the most prestigious, and perhaps the most powerful, of all American newspapers. The inner workings of a writer's life, the interplay between experience and writing, are brilliantly recounted by a master of the art. Gay Talese now focuses on his own life-the zeal for the truth, the narrative edge, the sometimes startling precision, that won accolades for his journalism and best-sellerdom and acclaim for his revelatory books about The New York Times (The Kingdom and the Power), the Mafia (Honor Thy Father), the sex industry (Thy Neighbor's Wife.

The inner workings of a writer's life, the interplay between experience and writing, are brilliantly recounted by a master of the art. Bestselling author Talese lays bare the secret internal intrigues behind the tradition of front page exposes in a story as gripping as a work of fiction and as immediate as today's headlines.

Gay Talese (/təˈliːz/; born February 7, 1932) is an American writer. As a journalist for The New York Times and Esquire magazine during the 1960s, Talese helped to define literary journalism. Talese's most famous articles are about Joe DiMaggio and Frank Sinatra. Born in Ocean City, New Jersey, the son of Italian immigrant parents, Talese graduated from Ocean City High School in 1949, and went on to a degree from the University of Alabama.

Gay Talese now focuses on his own life-the zeal for the truth, the narrative edge, the sometimes startling .

Gay Talese now focuses on his own life-the zeal for the truth, the narrative edge, the sometimes startling precision, that won accolades for his journalism and best-sellerdom and acclaim for his revelatory books about The New York Times (The Kingdom and the Power), the Mafia (Honor Thy Father), the sex industry (Thy Neighbor’s Wife), and, focusing on his own family, the American immigrant experience (Unto the Sons).

A Writer's Life book. Gay Talese now focuses on his own life-the zeal for the truth, the narrative edge, the sometimes startling precision, that won accolades for his journalism and best-sellerdom and acclaim for his revelatory books about The New York Times The inner workings of a writer’s life, the interplay between experience and writing, are brilliantly recounted by a master of the art.

Электронная книга "A Writer's Life", Gay Talese The inner workings of a writer’s life, the interplay between experience and writing, are brilliantly recounted by a master of the art.

Электронная книга "A Writer's Life", Gay Talese. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Writer's Life" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Although I thought about it many times the reason is t I learned as I grew up in a very loving family in Venezuela.

Although I thought about it many times the reason is t I learned as I grew up in a very loving family in Venezuela ll very much in love. They taught me to be committed to your spouse for life and that divorce wasn’t an option. A large part of my American Dream was to be married to one man for the rest of my life. I wasn’t perfect, but I was dedicated to our success as a young couple and to make our marriage work regardless of the cost.

A Reporter's Reporter. Continue reading the main story. It's hard to overstate Gay Talese's gold-standard reputation. A few years ago, David Halberstam called him "the most important nonfiction writer of his generation, the person whose work most influenced at least two generations of other reporters.

The inner workings of a writer’s life, the interplay between experience and writing, are brilliantly recounted by a master of the art. Gay Talese now focuses on his own life—the zeal for the truth, the narrative edge, the sometimes startling precision, that won accolades for his journalism and best-sellerdom and acclaim for his revelatory books about The New York Times (The Kingdom and the Power), the Mafia (Honor Thy Father), the sex industry (Thy Neighbor’s Wife), and, focusing on his own family, the American immigrant experience (Unto the Sons). How has Talese found his subjects? What has stimulated, blocked, or inspired his writing? Here are his amateur beginnings on his college newspaper; his professional climb at The New York Times; his desire to write on a larger canvas, which led him to magazine writing at Esquire and then to books. We see his involvement with issues of race from his student days in the Deep South to a recent interracial wedding in Selma, Alabama, where he once covered the fierce struggle for civil rights. Here are his reflections on the changing American sexual mores he has written about over the last fifty years, and a striking look at the lives—and their meaning—of Lorena and John Bobbitt. He takes us behind the scenes of his legendary profile of Frank Sinatra, his writings about Joe DiMaggio and heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson, and his interview with the head of a Mafia family.But he is at his most poignant in talking about the ordinary men and women whose stories led to his most memorable work. In remarkable fashion, he traces the history of a single restaurant location in New York, creating an ethnic mosaic of one restaurateur after the other whose dreams were dashed while a successor’s were born. And as he delves into the life of a young female Chinese soccer player, we see his consuming interest in the world in its latest manifestation.In these and other recollections and stories, Talese gives us a fascinating picture of both the serendipity and meticulousness involved in getting a story. He makes clear that every one of us represents a good one, if a writer has the curiosity to know it, the diligence to pursue it, and the desire to get it right.Candid, humorous, deeply impassioned—a dazzling book about the nature of writing in one man’s life, and of writing itself.
RUL
After I read "Unto The Sons, by Gay Telese, I was hooked. Telese is a gifted writer and who has a lot to say about the writing life and the dedication and perseverance a good article takes. He sometimes writes a long piece for the New Yorker Magazine which might take him a year. The Writer's Life is a great book by a skilled writer.
Phil Jacobs
Pana, Illinois
Eigonn
Excellent bio of one of the greatest journalist of US!
นℕĨĈტℝ₦
I had trouble reading this book. I didn't finish it. It seems plodding and takes forever to get to the point. Lots of long long run-on sentences. There were entire paragraphs that were one sentence long! My attention span is not that long. I admit I'm no intellectual, maybe that's the problem. I read his Brooklyn Bridge book and enjoyed that very much.
Quynaus
One of the best writers of the last years writing his life for us, readers, to learn abput him and how every single moment in life can be crossed by history. It's a jewel for journalists and anyone interested in learning about the process of writing.
Boraston
I would recommend this book to any one who likes the author Gay Talese or is interested is what it is like to be a reporter.
Faugami
Admittedly, a newcomer to the writings of Gay Talese, I engaged his most contemporary work to judge his great literary reputation for myself and I was not disappointed. I found that the former New York Times columnist is indeed a formidable writer, one that seamlessly and lucidly describes and observes diverse and far reaching topics while enjoying a huge talent for chronicling these observations. This work, written in 2006, encompassed a period where he had reached a literary creative block...on the hook for a new book, Talese instead decided to use the vast amount of unpublished research on varying topics that he'd accrued over time to write a book integrating these subjects all the while extolling the writer's need for motivation and challenge. A Writer's Life was the result and it puts a simple but elegant slant on the demands of a top author that has, as I've discovered, been Talese's demon for all his literary life.

The trick for any writer, and one in which he/she is ultimately measured, is his ability to take virtually any topic and write it in such a way as to be interesting and literary. I'm not sure that many authors can tackle topics such as New York City architecture, restaurants, civil rights and a horrendous crime that becomes nationally scrutinized (John and Lorena Bobbitt) and deliver them in as smooth a narrative flow as well as Talese. His writing is explanatory and well researched while having a fluidity and attention to nuance that expands these topics while making the transition from one to the next seem effortless. On top of all this, Talese, in this work, writes damn good history...his coverage, now and then, of the civil rights movement from the crucible of turmoil (Selma, Alabama), portrays this saga from a unique perspective and, in my opinion, offers a fresh look at an oft covered topic.

Judged by others to be a sub-par effort, "A Writer's Life", to me, exposes the mastering of the written word that Gay Talese has learned over time. I certainly plan to read his other acknowledged "masterpiece" works (The Kingdom and the Power, The Bridge, Thy Neighbor's Wife...etc) and some of his more famous magazine essays (Frank Sinatra, Joe DiMaggio...) but I'll wager that the literary experience will be the same...marveling at a significant writer at the top of his game.
Wymefw
Mr. Talese manages to put the biggest portion of his life out in the open but it is so much a part of why he writes that a reader can easily miss its import. He was given a good home but was isolated as a child from his own parents due to their private and exclusive pairing. They had such a closeness that their two children felt invisible as children. Extremely so, although his ties to his dad bring the father's character through. Not so the mother, whose time is taken up by her talkative clients, to whom she sells oversized dresses. So, there is a matter-of-fact rendering of what is, at heart, a rather insulting and strange situation. His private life was very public. He compares his mother to a movie star in looks, but little else is seen or known about the woman, and the mothering side of her may have been nonexistant. She seems to have related to everyone but her children. They lived above the tailoring shop and he cannot recall a meal that was not intruded upon by his father or mother's clients. The clients were the basis of the family's income, and were catered to. Some were demanding. His dad had wanted to be a monk and was a devout, religious man, so one wonders... He renders his mother as a business woman, first, last, foremost, and as a preppy oldster, but she is either not understood or there is not a lot to her to understand. He developed a natural desire to shine outside the home, I think to find his identity. And, yet, he is not complaining in this book, but it is an odd position he describes. He has managed to make an interesting life, and I am interested in reading his other works where he identifies with outsiders. I think he understands them.