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eBook Trust in the Law: Encouraging Public Cooperation with the Police and Courts (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust) download
Health and Fitness
Author: Yuen Huo,Tom R. Tyler
ISBN: 0871548895
Subcategory: Psychology & Counseling
Pages 264 pages
Publisher Russell Sage Foundation; 1St Edition edition (October 10, 2002)
Language English
Category: Health and Fitness
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 190
ePUB size: 1993 kb
FB2 size: 1182 kb
DJVU size: 1101 kb
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eBook Trust in the Law: Encouraging Public Cooperation with the Police and Courts (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust) download

by Yuen Huo,Tom R. Tyler


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Series: Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust (Book 5). Hardcover: 264 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0871548894. Product Dimensions: 6 x . x 9 inches. Back to top.

In Trust in the Law, psychologists Tom R. Tyler and Yuen J. Huo present a compelling argument that effective law enforcement requires the active engagement and participation of the communities it serves, and argue for a cooperative approach to law enforcement that appeals t. . Huo present a compelling argument that effective law enforcement requires the active engagement and participation of the communities it serves, and argue for a cooperative approach to law enforcement that appeals to people's sense of fair play, even if the outcomes are not always those with which they agree.

New York: Russell Sage Foundation, pp. 24. paper traces the development of public trust in courts in the Czech Republic and uses the Visegrad countries to provide a broader context for the analysis.

paper traces the development of public trust in courts in the Czech Republic and uses the Visegrad countries to provide a broader context for the analysis. After providing a definition of public trust and explaining the importance of public trust in judiciary, the paper concentrates on analysis of empirical data regarding the development of general trust, trust in judicial system and trust in other institutions in Visegrad countries (parliaments, presidents and the police) during the last 25 years.

Series: The Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust. The same polls also reveal a disturbing racial divide, with minorities expressing greater levels of distrust than whites. Published by: Russell Sage Foundation. Practices such as racial profiling, zero-tolerance and three-strikes laws, the use of excessive force, and harsh punishments for minor drug crimes all contribute to perceptions of injustice.

The same polls also reveal a disturbing racial divide, with minorities expressing greater levels of distrust than whites.

Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination.

Trust in the Law: Encouraging Public Cooperation with the Police and Courts. By Tom R. Huo. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2002. Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination. The Mark of a Criminal Record.

Perception of the police treatment had an effect on procedural justice. Those findings seem to indicate that if adolescents perceive a fair police treatment and procedure, their acceptance of the treatment and sentence will be more likely. Such an outcome, in turn, could help in their reintegration to society.

New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2002. Uggen, Christopher, and Jeff Manza. Democratic Contraction? The Political Consequences of Felon Disenfranchisement in the United States. Deadly Symbiosis: When Ghetto and Prison Meet and Merge. Mass Imprisonment: Social Causes and Consequences. New York: Sage Publications, 2001.

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Public opinion polls suggest that American's trust in the police and courts is declining. The same polls also reveal a disturbing racial divide, with minorities expressing greater levels of distrust than whites. Practices such as racial profiling, zero-tolerance and three-strikes laws, the use of excessive force, and harsh punishments for minor drug crimes all contribute to perceptions of injustice. In Trust in the Law, psychologists Tom R. Tyler and Yuen J. Huo present a compelling argument that effective law enforcement requires the active engagement and participation of the communities it serves, and argue for a cooperative approach to law enforcement that appeals to people's sense of fair play, even if the outcomes are not always those with which they agree. Based on a wide-ranging survey of citizens who had recent contact with the police or courts in Oakland and Los Angeles, Trust in the Law examines the sources of people's favorable and unfavorable reactions to their encounters with legal authorities. Tyler and Huo address the issue from a variety of angles: the psychology of decision acceptance, the importance of individual personal experiences, and the role of ethnic group identification. They find that people react primarily to whether or not they are treated with dignity and respect, and the degree to which they feel they have been treated fairly helps to shape their acceptance of the legal process. Their findings show significantly less willingness on the part of minority group members who feel they have been treated unfairly to trust the motives to subsequent legal decisions of law enforcement authorities. Since most people in the study generalize from their personal experiences with individual police officers and judges, Tyler and Huo suggest that gaining maximum cooperation and consent of the public depends upon fair and transparent decision-making and treatment on the part of law enforcement officers. Tyler and Huo conclude that the best way to encourage compliance with the law is for legal authorities to implement programs that foster a sense of personal involvement and responsibility. For example, community policing programs, in which the local population is actively engaged in monitoring its own neighborhood, have been shown to be an effective tool in improving police-community relationships. Cooperation between legal authorities and community members is a much discussed but often elusive goal. Trust in the Law shows that legal authorities can behave in ways that encourage the voluntary acceptance of their directives, while also building trust and confidence in the overall legitimacy of the police and courts. A Volume in the Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust
heart of sky
I ordered the book for a class and the return date of the book was only a month long, how is one supposed to use the book for a 3 month class and only be able to use it for a month before completely "buying" it.
BeatHoWin
Great!
Phain
Its a text book. Everything I needed.