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eBook Essential Daredevil Vol.1: Daredevil #1-25 (v. 1) download
Graphic Novels and Comics
Author: Wally Wood,John Romita,Gene Colan,Stan Lee
ISBN: 1904159508
Subcategory: Graphic Novels
Pages 544 pages
Publisher Panini Books (May 1, 2004)
Language English
Category: Graphic Novels and Comics
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 515
ePUB size: 1691 kb
FB2 size: 1217 kb
DJVU size: 1671 kb
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eBook Essential Daredevil Vol.1: Daredevil #1-25 (v. 1) download

by Wally Wood,John Romita,Gene Colan,Stan Lee


Essential Daredevil Vo. : Daredevil Paperback – 1 May 2004. 2 people found this helpful.

Essential Daredevil Vo. by Stan Lee (Author), Wally Wood (Illustrator), John Romita (Illustrator), Gene Colan (Illustrator) & 1 more.

Essential Daredevil - Volume 1: Reissue Paperback – May 9, 2012. by. Stan Lee (Author). After reading Essential Daredevil Volume 1, I found that my feelings haven't changed that much. For those unfamiliar with Daredevil, he is actually Matt Murdock, a well-respected lawyer. The twist is that Murdock is blind, the result of an accident involving radioactive material. The bottom line is: if you're a fan of Daredevil, especially in his early days (60s thru the early 70s) this book is a must-have for your collection.

A Stan Lee Gene Colan Epic Extravaganza! Inked By: Frank Giacoia.

Fantastic Four Amazing Fantasy (Spider-Man's First Appearance). Tales of Suspense (Iron Man's First Appearance). Avengers Incredible Hulk (Wolverine's First Appearance). Lettered By: Art Simek.

Essential Daredevil, Vol. 1 book. There's some good art in here from Gene Colan, John Romita Sr (with some obvious Jack Kirby layouts to start with), and Wally Wood. Stan Lee is not at his best. This is one of his more painful love triangles. A collection of Daredevil's first run by Stan Lee ( - It's pretty kitschy with Lee's prose undeniably clunky and heavy-handed. Having every character explain the hows and whys of what they're doing is far from realistic. It reads like Adam West as Batman talks basically. In spite of that, there's some great ideas.

Author Stan Lee. Illustrator Wallace Wood, John Romita, Gene Colan. Unknown - Please report. Essential Daredevil, Vol. 1 (Marvel Essentials) (v. 1). Publisher. : Daredevil By (author) Stan Lee, Illustrated by Wally Wood, Illustrated by John Romita, Illustrated by Gene Colan. Long before his days as the urban protector of gritty Hell's Kitchen, Daredevil was known as The Man Without Fear. A childhood accident robbed Matt Murdock of his sight - but in exchange, blessed him with an extraordinary radar sense. Donning a colourful costume, Matt used this powerful gift to fight an ingenious array of supervillains that puts even Spider-Man's rogues' gallery to shame! show more.

Collects Daredevil (1964-1998 1st Series) . Written by Stan Lee. Art by Wally Wood, Gene Colan, John Romita, S. and Bob Hall. Published Apr 2004 by Marvel the Stilt-Man?

Volume 1 reprints Daredevil of the first series, by Stan Lee, Bill Everett, Joe Orlando, Wally Wood, John Romita, Jack Kirby, Gene Colan and many others! Volume 2, out in 2004, reprints Daredevil

Volume 1 reprints Daredevil of the first series, by Stan Lee, Bill Everett, Joe Orlando, Wally Wood, John Romita, Jack Kirby, Gene Colan and many others! Volume 2, out in 2004, reprints Daredevil Annual and Fantastic Four by Stan Lee and Gene Colan! Vo. reprints V1 Iron Man Vo. reprints V1 Avengers Vo. reprints V1 Marvel Two-In-One #3.

3 Essential Daredevil. 2001): story by Stan Lee and Kevin Hall, art by Gene Colan and Tom Palmer. Daredevil: Yellow (Aug. 2001 – Jan. Artist John Romita J. who illustrated Daredevil stories under writers such as Ann Nocenti and Frank Miller, signing a copy of issue 254 of the series (Vol 1) at Midtown Comics in Manhattan. Daredevil (April 1964 – Oct. 1998). 1994) by Frank Miller and John Romita, Jr. Daredevil (17-page comic published within Wizard Aug. 1999).

Writer Stan Lee and artists Bill Everett, Joe Orlando, Wallace Wood, John Romita Sr. and Gene Colan lay the . He becomes Daredevil, a gritty hero born from murder but tempered with the desire to protect the downtrodden. and Gene Colan lay the foundation of Marvel's Man Without Fear, including the first appearances of core characters Foggy Nelson and Karen Page - and classic villains like the Owl, the Purple Man, Stilt-Man and the Gladiator! Collecting DAREDEVIL (1964) Born to a past-his-prime prizefighter, Matt Murdock's luck always ran a step behind his good intentions.

It's so easy
I got this for my father for father's day some time back. Daredevil was always one of his favorite comic book heroes. He always appreciated that he overcame the obstacles of being blind and becoming a great athelete and super hero. for nostalgia he loved it. id recommend this also to anyone that likes the Daredevil TV show as it gives insight to Matt Murdoch's origin.
Undeyn
As a young comics reader, Daredevil never had the same appeal to me as other Marvel characters like the Fantastic Four or Spiderman. That would change, however, when Frank Miller took over the book and brought new life to a superhero who previously seemed a little boring. Now, over two decades later, my tastes have changed and I felt it was worth giving the pre-Miller Daredevil another chance. After reading Essential Daredevil Volume 1, I found that my feelings haven't changed that much.

For those unfamiliar with Daredevil, he is actually Matt Murdock, a well-respected lawyer. The twist is that Murdock is blind, the result of an accident involving radioactive material. That same material, however, enhanced all his other senses, to the extent that he can hear the faintest sound, read regular print by feeling the ink patterns on paper, and most importantly, he can sense people and objects around him with a radar sense (akin to bats).

The twenty-five issues in this volume introduce Daredevil and provide his origin, showing how he developed his fighting skills and became a hero to avenge his father's death. Though he is in top shape, he is only human, so most of his foes have relatively minor powers; when he goes up against someone like the Sub-Mariner (who can hold his own against the Avengers), Daredevil is clearly out of his league. Against foes like the Owl, Gladiator or Stilt-Man, however, the fights get more interesting.

While Stan Lee does a decent job writing this book, he is obviously not giving it the same effort as his bigger books like FF or Spiderman. We see this in two ways: first, the villains are not all that wonderful, and Daredevil never really gets a real archenemy the way the Fantastic Four has Dr. Doom or Spiderman has Dr. Octopus and the Green Goblin (Daredevil's biggest enemies, Bullseye and the Kingpin are far in the future). Also, the supporting cast is pretty weak. One of Spiderman's strengths is its strong cast of characters from the start: Aunt May, J. Jonah Jameson, Flash Thompson, etc.; Daredevil only has Murdock's partner and secretary, Foggy Nelson and Karen Page respectively. Foggy is bland (with little of the oafish humor he would later get) and Karen is the typical comic book female in this era, always pining away for Matt and getting into danger.

Overall, these are okay issues but far from spectacular; while they will be interesting to Daredevil fans who want to read his early history, they will pale when compared to the other comics I've mentioned. Not bad, not really good, this volume is three star material.
Yanki
Nothing can ever take away the flavor of those very first issues of Daredevil. If you love comics in general, it's purity is not equaled. The artwork is intense, and yes, dated, and that is sad at times, some do not like it, prefering instead the flashy, painted current stories now the flavor of the month. I collect the Essentials and Showcase because I am a purist, and every lover of this era or character should own this one.
Fhois
It is truly a treat to read these Marvel Essentials. Daredevil is a blind crime fighter who fights using every sense but eye sight. His wits mixed with strength create quite the enjoyable read, also Matt Murdock's lawyer life is interesting too.
Gavikelv
Marvel Comics certainly hit a gold mine with their "Essentials" collection. Especially among comic collectors. Where else could you get the original first 25 issues of Daredevil for under $20? The only drawback, if you will, is that it is in black and white. The bottom line is: if you're a fan of Daredevil, especially in his early days (60s thru the early 70s) this book is a must-have for your collection.
MrDog
This review is more about the book condition than the stories, The book was new but during the second time reading a reading the glue came off and the cover is detached from the binding. Now I have to be careful I don't end up with a hundred pages of loose pages.
Saithinin
My rule of thumb with the Essential series has been to always buy the newer editions, as Marvel has tended to upgrade reproduction quality of these books whenever they can. As this is a rare case where I have both old (2002) and new (2012) editions of Essential Daredevil 1, I thought I'd take a look at the differences.

First of all, the new edition—with D.D. in yellow on its cover—has noticeable upgrades in quality to the first issues (#1-10). And it’s not always just a difference in clarity, but in rendering and inking styles. Between the two editions, there are clearly different hands at work on Daredevil #1, employing different feathering techniques, for example. Did Marvel uncover some old photostats, allowing them to throw away a badly modified reprint they'd been using for years? I’d have to say ‘yes’. Issue #1 was credited to artist Bill Everett; issue #2, to Joe Orlando with Vince Colletta on inks. There's a significant amount of additional detail in issue #2 that looks distinctly Colletta-ish and more clarity and "pop" in the issues drawn and inked by Wally Wood. Improvements like this start to level off with issue #11, though, which looks slightly better but still plugged-up overall. By the time Romita takes over drawing and inking in issue #12, there's no apparent difference. The good issues still look good (e.g., #12-13), and the bad issues (e.g., #14) still look bad.

But here’s a funny twist: The artwork looks about 10% larger in the older edition. Covers that were 9 3/8" tall in the old edition become 8 7/8" in the new edition—a reduction in height of 1/2 inch. (OK technically, that's about 5%.) All things being equal, a larger image will offer better reproduction, which means the older edition might actually be an improvement for some of these later issues. This was a surprise.

I will say that the new edition looks crisper and cleaner overall, with whiter pages, blacker ink, and more consistent margins. (It also looks significantly fatter!) And if you're a fan of those early issues by Everett, Colletta or Wood, it's definitely worth seeking out. There's a cool extra in the back, too: a set of character designs by Wally Wood for D.D., M.M., Foggy and Karen. But for some issues, like those by Romita and Colan, you may actually be downgrading your reading experience slightly, compared to the earlier edition.