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eBook Battle of Britain (We Were There Books) download
For Children
Author: Clayton Knight,K.S. Knight
ISBN: 0561001987
Pages 179 pages
Publisher Bailey Bros.& Swinfen Ltd; New Ed edition (March 4, 1974)
Language English
Category: For Children
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 801
ePUB size: 1336 kb
FB2 size: 1665 kb
DJVU size: 1524 kb
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eBook Battle of Britain (We Were There Books) download

by Clayton Knight,K.S. Knight


Clayton Knight OBE (March 30, 1891 – July 17, 1969) was an American aviator during World War I. He was also an aviation artist and illustrator, and is known for being one of the founders of the Clayton Knight Committee and the illustrator of the comi.

Clayton Knight OBE (March 30, 1891 – July 17, 1969) was an American aviator during World War I. He was also an aviation artist and illustrator, and is known for being one of the founders of the Clayton Knight Committee and the illustrator of the comic strip Ace Drummond. Rochester, New York was Knight's birthplace. He went to school at the Art Institute of Chicago under famous artists, Robert Henri and George Bellows, from 1910 to 1913

About the We Were There Books We Were There books are easy to read and provide exciting . Each book in the series is a fictional retelling of an historical event, featuring one or more tween children as primary characters.

About the We Were There Books We Were There books are easy to read and provide exciting, entertaining stories, based upon true historic events. Each story is checked for factual accuracy by an outstanding authority on this particular phase of our history. Although children most likely would not have been present or able to participate in the action like these characters do, it makes for great story-telling and enables the reader to see history develop right along with the character.

by Clayton Knight (Author). We Were There with Lewis and Clark (We Were There Books). We were there when Grant met Lee at Appomattox (We were there books). We Were There at the Battle of the Alamo. We Were There at the Battle of Lexington and Concord (We Were There books, 20). Felix Sutton.

We Were There at the Normandy Invasion by. Clayton Knight.

Knight, Clayton, 1891-1969; Knight, Katharine Sturges, joint author. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. World War, 1939-1945. New York, Grosset & Dunlap. Uploaded by loader-DanaB on May 14, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Knight and his wife were also illustrators of children's books, and often collaborated. He wrote and illustrated a few We Were There books, which were historical novels for children

Knight and his wife were also illustrators of children's books, and often collaborated. He wrote and illustrated a few We Were There books, which were historical novels for children. This particular series was written as a fictional retelling of a historical event, featuring kids as the primary characters . at the Battle of Britain, the latter written with his wife. Both Knight and his wife were illustrators for the .

The original coming of knights to Britain was early in the eleventh century. This motion was symbolic of the recognition of the knight by somebody of higher ranking

The original coming of knights to Britain was early in the eleventh century. French soldiers came to England fighting off the backs of their horses and were called knights by the English people (Steele 11). This title had nothing to do with social distinction among men; in fact, nearly any man could become a knight if he had a horse and sword. Over time the importance of these mounted men would greatly increase. This motion was symbolic of the recognition of the knight by somebody of higher ranking. After this, the new knight would receive the blessed sword and weapons used by the knight who trained him (Scher 2). 2 pages, 601 words. He went to school at the Art Institute of Chicago under famous artists, Robert Henri and George Bellows, from 1910 to 1913

The Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), known . Some of these awards were made posthumously, whilst others would learn of their awards whilst a prisoner of war in Britain or, later, in Canada.

The Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), known simply as the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross), was the highest German military award of the Second World War. Instituted on 1 September 1939, to coincide with the German invasion of Poland, it was awarded for leadership, valor or skill. As the war progressed, higher variants were instituted, namely the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves, Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords, and the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves Swords and Diamonds.

From United Kingdom to . Destination, rates & speeds. About this Item: Paperback. A readable copy of the book which may include some defects such as highlighting and notes. Cover and pages may be creased and show discolouration. Seller Inventory GOR005980442. More information about this seller Contact this seller 1. Stock Image. Battle of Britain (Activity books, Dennis Knight).

Heraly
This work, The Battle of Britain by Quentin Reynolds is one of about 185 books included in the Landmark Series; books for young readers from the ages 10 to 15. These include 103 books dealing directly with U.S. History and the rest with world history.

I was lucky in that my mother had the foresight to purchase these books as they were published (At the time they sold for about $1.50 per book) so I now have almost the entire set. Random House started publishing these in 1970 and continued until 1970. The book being reviewed here has been in my collection since 1953.

This is of course a book addressing one of the greatest air wars in history...The Battle of Britain where the outcome of WWII hung on a razors edge. It is written for younger folks but to be quite honest, it is a worthwhile read for adults. I read this particular work several times growing up and recently gave it another read.

As another reviewer has pointed out, this work would not actually be appropriate for research as it does contain some minor errors as to aircraft, personnel and such. But for young ones for which it was intended , it is more than adequate as the book does give a wonderful overview and stresses the importance of this event.

It is interesting to note that the original copy write date on this book is 1946 which was not long after the battle actually took place.

The book is well written and is most certainly worth the read. Your kids will learn much from it. We live in a world now where most H.S. kids cannot distinguish between the Civil War and the Vietnam war with any sort of accuracy and the more history they know, the better of they will be...or so I feel.

This book is part of my private collection.
Wild Python
Wow. This was the first book I ever owned, a birthday present in 1954, a year after publication. I've kept it all these years/decades for just that reason.

Quentin Reynolds had a well deserved reputation as a journalist, and his Yank Interviewing the RAF approach lends immediacy. As does his contact with British civilians, merchant seamen and others. But with the benefit of hindsight, and sources unimaginable in 1953, let alone 1940, it's possible to examine some of QR's subjects. Oddly, he states that "Squadron Leader" Arthur Douglas was KIA when in fact Pilot Officer Douglas of 610 Sqn survived the war.

Reynolds describes meeting some members of the "American Eagle Squadron" when no such unit(s) were operational in 1940. Seven US citizens flew in the Battle (thus violating US neutrality laws) but the three Eagle Squadrons were not combat-ready until 1941.

Other glitches include P-40s and "P-37 Mohawks" arriving in Britain during the Battle. Actually, the Tomahawk/Kittyhawk never flew in NW Europe, and the P-36 was obsolete by 1940.

The Landmark books offered an extraordinary variety of subjects to young readers, and Random House deserves credit for maintaining the series for so long. But they're best read as pop history rather than as useful references.