» » Working Cotton (Caldecott Honor Book)
eBook Working Cotton (Caldecott Honor Book) download
For Children
Author: Carole Byard,Sherley Anne Williams
ISBN: 0152996249
Subcategory: Geography & Cultures
Pages 32 pages
Publisher Harcourt Brace & Company; 1st ed edition (September 15, 1992)
Language English
Category: For Children
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 588
ePUB size: 1407 kb
FB2 size: 1181 kb
DJVU size: 1308 kb
Other formats: rtf mbr doc docx

eBook Working Cotton (Caldecott Honor Book) download

by Carole Byard,Sherley Anne Williams


A complete list of Caldecott medal and honor books from 1938 to present

A complete list of Caldecott medal and honor books from 1938 to present. The medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. Alma and How She Got Her Name, illustrated and written by Juana Martinez-Neal (Candlewick). A Big Mooncake for Little Star, illustrated and written by Grace Lin (Little, Brown/Hachette).

Working Cotton is a 1992 Caldecott Honor Book, Coretta Scott King Honor Book for Illustration, and an ALA Notable Book. It was written by Sherley Anne Williams and illustrated by Carole Byard

Working Cotton is a 1992 Caldecott Honor Book, Coretta Scott King Honor Book for Illustration, and an ALA Notable Book. It was written by Sherley Anne Williams and illustrated by Carole Byard. It was based off Williams's childhood experience in the Fresno cotton fields

Working Cotton written by Sherley Anne Williams and illustrated by Carole Byard, tells the story of a young african american girl named Shelan who picks cotton in the fields with her parents and sisters. Shelan arrives on a bus with her family to pick cotton and wonders if when she grows up she will be able to pick even more cotton like her sisters.

The illustrator was Carole Byard and the book was a 1993 Caldecott Honor book (.

It is beautifully written and illustrated. The illustrator was Carole Byard and the book was a 1993 Caldecott Honor book (. a runner-up to the Medal winner) for best illustrations in a book for children. A Moving Depiction of Migrant Labor. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 20 years ago.

The Randolph Caldecott Medal annually recognizes the preceding year's "most distinguished American picture book for children", beginning with 1937 publications

The Randolph Caldecott Medal annually recognizes the preceding year's "most distinguished American picture book for children", beginning with 1937 publications. It is awarded to the illustrator by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The Caldecott and Newbery Medals are the most prestigious American children's book awards.

Check out our caldecott honor book selection for the very best in unique . Popular items for caldecott honor book.

Check out our caldecott honor book selection for the very best in unique or custom, handmade pieces from our shops.

Caldecott Honor Book. Caldecott" redirects here. Byard, Carole !Carole Byard. For other uses, see Caldecott (disambiguation). The annual number of Caldecott Honor Books ranges from one to five, same as for the Newbery Medal during the same timespan, from 1938. For two decades 1993–2012 there were two to four Honors every year. Yellow background highlights the Medalists.

by Sherley Anne Williams & illustrated by Carole Byard work. A brief, deeply felt portrait.

by Sherley Anne Williams & illustrated by Carole Byard.

By Sherley Anne Williams. Illustrated by Carole Byard. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Ages 4 to 8) All the children help Mamma and Daddy pick cotton. A 1993 Caldecott Honor Book. MALCOLM X: By Any Means Necessary. By Walter Dean Myers. It was based off Williams's childhood experience in the Fresno cotton fields.

This child’s view of the long day’s work in the cotton fields, simply expressed in a poet’s resonant language, is a fresh and stirring look at migrant family life. “With its restrained poetic text and impressionist paintings, this is a picture book for older readers, too.”--Booklist
Iaiastta
This product checked all the boxes.
They sound great and the auto pairing works seemlessly. Like the Apple AirPods they also automatically connect to your phone when you take them out of the charging case.
The charging case is durable and fits easily into a pocket. The ear buds are comfortable and most importantly stay in your ear comfortably.
I give this product a big thumbs up and plan to order another pair for my spouses bday.
Sagda
As you read This book made you feel apart of the story. It was a great read to share with children.
Blacknight
I hate the south; it burns my soul. This is a book of inequality - economics of inequitable distribution. It is about the Other -those that live south of your border. I never want to go south again.
Author's Note: Our shame as a nation is not that so many children work the fields but that so few of them have other options. That the life chances of too many are defined by the cycle of the seasons in environments characterized by minimums - minimum wages, minimum shelters, minimum food and education - individual character, the love of a family can only do so much, the rest is up to the country (Williams 1992 inside cover http://www.amazon.com/Working-Cotton-Sherley-Anne-Williams/dp/0152014829#reader).Working Cotton
Adoranin
A stunningly beautiful picture book that captures the children, the people, that land in which I grew up. So pleased to have seen and to own this book.
Cktiell
I regret not having had that book when I was still teaching English. I might forard it to my still teaching colleagues
GoodBuyMyFriends
one of the most racist book i have ever read .
also it is so hateful and preachy that a child would be scared for life after reading this racist book
Zyniam
A standalone picture book that reflects Williams' early life as a child in the cotton fields in Fresno. In 1993, Working Cotton won the Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King Award for Illustrator Honor. And I thoroughly understand why!

My Take
There's a rhythmic quality to Williams' words as she remembers her childhood, as she pulls you in with that dreamy quality, in to Shelan's world, to show you what a day in the fields was like. The sense of competition between the sisters, that need to be like each other and yet not. Especially, *laughing*, as Shelan wishes to both grow up and be young enough to sit at the end of the row and watch the baby.

The manner in which Williams manipulates the grammar and sentence structure is another way to pull you in and indicates Shelan's educational level.

I know Byard's illustrations are in acrylics — it says so in the front of the book! But there's a feel of pastels about these intense colors, the soft smudgy feel of the graphics that make you feel the seriousness of it as well as that dreamy feel of Williams' memories.

It's a beautifully illustrated and written story of a day in the life of a family picking cotton.

The Story
It's cold that early in the morning, although the day will heat up fast enough, Shelan notes.

I'm growing up, but not enough yet to have my own sack while Daddy picks cotton so fast that you never see him do it while Mamma sings to while the day away.

The Characters
Shelan is the young girl, the storyteller; her sisters include Ruise, Jesmarie, and baby Leanne. Mamma and Daddy are the kind of people who should have children. God knows, that's rare enough!

The Cover and Title
The cover has an Impressionist feel to it with its hazy cotton, blue summer sky, and Shelan in her turquoise green dress and brown jacket. The title is in a white serif font with an orange outline.

The title is what the day is all about, Working Cotton.
I read this book as part of an assignment. It is a Caldecott Honor Book and I am very familiar with picking cotton. I was born the daughter of a cotton share-cropper, so my earliest memories are some of the very same things that appear in this book.
Cotton picking by hand is hard. It is backbreaking, and the days are hot and long. However, I had a few concerns about this book. It is written in the local dialect and speech patterns of the Black child who is telling the story. It was rather difficult to read but easy to understand what she meant. Since this is a child's book, I am not certain that every child would understand the language system that is portrayed. A teacher needs to be completely aware and ready to explain the dialect.
Also, even though the child describes a typical day of cotton picking, hard, hot, long,and lonely for socialization, I do wish the fact had been brought out that other ethnicities picked cotton as well as Blacks. It is hard work no matter who picks the cotton.
The illustrations were done nicely and the family structure was portrayed as intact. However, it reminded me all too well of the long, hot days my family spent in the cotton fields.