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eBook I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This download
For Children
Author: Jacqueline Woodson
ISBN: 0440219604
Subcategory: Geography & Cultures
Publisher Laurel Leaf (November 1, 1995)
Language English
Category: For Children
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 832
ePUB size: 1536 kb
FB2 size: 1285 kb
DJVU size: 1457 kb
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eBook I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This download

by Jacqueline Woodson


Soon the town Woodson, Jacqueline. I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This. New York: Speak, 2006. JACQUELINE WOODSON Woodson's novel, though short and sweet, says enough without saying too much, almost like the title itself.

Soon the town Woodson, Jacqueline. Target Audience: 15-18 year-olds. Thirteen year-old Marie has grown up pretty lucky, living as a black girl in the affluent part of her small town in Ohio with her civil rights activist father who teaches at the local university. She knows she'll grow up and go to college, she has a roof over her head and a dad that loves her. But she deals silently with the empty space her mother's departure left.

I Hadn’t Meant To Tell You This. Marie and Lena are both motherless. Marie is black and well off. And in the small town of Chauncey, Ohio blacks and whites don’t mix. But Lena and Marie become friends anyway. One of them has a terrible secret and the other must decide-Is it best to keep it? Or should she tell someone fast? Where it takes place: In the small town of Chauncey, Ohio.

Book in the I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This Series). Jacqueline Woodson has used good taste in confronting the issue of child abuse. She presents two girls from very different backgrounds and bring them together to form a beautiful friendship. by Jacqueline Woodson. The book is a must read for young adult audiences.

Jacqueline Woodson was born in Columbus, Ohio on February 12, 1963. Her books include The House You Pass on the Way, I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This, Lena, and The Day You Begin. in English from Adelphi University in 1985. She won the Coretta Scott King Award in 2001 for Miracle's Boys. After Tupac and D Foster, Feathers, and Show Way won Newbery Honors. Brown Girl Dreaming won the E. B. White Read-Aloud Award in 2015.

Jacqueline Woodson is the 2018-2019 National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Twelve-year-old Marie is a leader among the popular black. People Who Read I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This Also Read. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Looking for More Great Reads? Discover Book Picks from the CEO of Penguin Random House US. Close.

Jacqueline Woodson won a Coretta Scott King Honor for this moving, tightly written tale of friendship, racism, and loss. Lena makes Marie promise not to tell anyone and this is another part of the book where you watch Marie try to help without being able to. All she can do is look out for Lena when she can. I don't want to give too much away about this book, however I did find that when it ended I was left with many questions.

Jacqueline Woodson (born February 12, 1963) is an American writer of books for children and adolescents. She is best known for Miracle's Boys, and her Newbery Honor-winning titles Brown Girl Dreaming, After Tupac and D Foster, Feathers, and Show Way. After serving as the Young People's Poet Laureate from 2015 to 2017, she was named the National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, by the Library of Congress, for 2018–19

Jacqueline Woodson ( is the 2018-2019 National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, and she received .

Jacqueline Woodson ( is the 2018-2019 National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, and she received the 2018 Children's Literature Legacy Award. Born on February 12th in Columbus, Ohio, Jacqueline Woodson grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, and Brooklyn, New York and graduated from college with a . Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Twelve-year-old Marie is a leader among the popular black girls in Chauncey, Ohio, a prosperous black suburb. She isn't looking for a friend when Lena Bright, a white girl, appears in school. Yet they are drawn to each other because both have lost their mothers. And they know how to keep a secret. For Lena has a secret that is terrifying, and she's desperate to protect herself and her younger sister from their father. Marie must decide whether she can help Lena by keeping her secret...or by telling it.
Maman
I loved this book growing up. It was given to me by my grandma. I had lost it through years of moving, and had forgotten the name of it. I searched for the title using characters and a brief description of what it was about. Finally found the title, and immediately searched for it here. For only a penny plus shipping!! I was thrilled! The book arrived in no time, and in pretty good shape. I am happy to be able to reread a childhood book again.
Steelrunner
very good book, easy to read, its a sad story but i think it kept the attention of a lot of my teen girls
Beabandis
Much needed poignant novel that addresses the topic of sexual abuse. It is essential that sensitive, intelligent books on this topic are available for kids. Woodson tells a beautiful story of middle school friendship and depicts the trauma of abuse with integrity. A courageous and ground breaking book.
Gralinda
bought for daughter she enjoyed it
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
I had to read this book for my Children's Literature class. It was great! Interesting role reversal for a change.
Flas
great story! It is amazing how we connect with each other. This story is about following your heart.
Voodoosida
Though one of the core themes in this book is abuse, the story really isn't about it. It really is more about social tension between races and economic divides. It follows these two girls from different backgrounds as they become good friends. It is an interesting take on race relations, as both girls are raised by racist fathers who teach them to hate the other.

It's a touching story and beautifully written, but I had a major issue with it. It's written in a first-person POV from Marie's perspective, who is 13 years old, but this story is written so poetically that it's ridiculous to believe that any 13 year old would ever speak this way. Both her and the other main character are so philosophic and wax poetic on deep issues and themes that it was just impossible for me to buy. While beautifully written, it didn't sound realistic at all. Distractingly unrealistic, in fact. Especially when the POV character doesn't necessarily speak that way to the people around her. To other characters in the book, she speaks fairly normal for a kid, but when she's telling the reader, she breaks out metaphors, similies, and symbolism that is beyond the grasp of most adults, let alone middle school kids. Not to mention displaying an incredible understanding of everything from human nature to a detailed history of the economics in her city.

It's hard, because the writing is superb, but incredibly misplaced for the narration. If it had been 3rd person narrative, I would have loved it. But as a 1st person, it just loses credibility for me.
I Hadn't Meant To Tell You This is the story of Lena, a new white girl in a school that's population is mostly black. Marie, who is an upper class African-American becomes the unlikely friend to Lena, who usually looks dirty and unkempt next to the fashionable and popular Marie.

Right here - right with this friendship I was already liking the book. With both families frowning on their daughters friendship with someone who is "another color" . I appreciated that this book was in contrast to many others I have read, and it is Marie's family that had the money and the nice home was the African-American family, and it is Lena's home that is in the bad neighborhood.

This book gets deep when Lena confides in her friend Marie that her father is touching her inappropriately. Marie, who has never been around such a think has a hard time wrapping her mind around this, even accusing Lena of lying for attention. This subject in the book, as well as Marie's reaction to it, seems very well written.... I can picture it happening.

Lena makes Marie promise not to tell anyone and this is another part of the book where you watch Marie try to help without being able to. All she can do is look out for Lena when she can.

I don't want to give too much away about this book, however I did find that when it ended I was left with many questions. I didn't feel the closure this book needed and was concerned where this left younger readers who may be searching for answers within this book. I was pleased to go on-line and find out a sequel to the book had been written called Lena - and it continues the story from where this one left off.

This book touches on sexual abuse by a parent. It is a quick read and the book is very clean, never explicit in details.