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eBook Loop  ('Ring' series, Book 3) download
Fiction
Author: Koji Suzuki
ISBN: 1932234152
Subcategory: World Literature
Pages 288 pages
Publisher Vertical; First American Edition edition (October 1, 2005)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 654
ePUB size: 1962 kb
FB2 size: 1776 kb
DJVU size: 1876 kb
Other formats: docx lit lrf lrf

eBook Loop ('Ring' series, Book 3) download

by Koji Suzuki


Koji Suzuki was born in 1957 in Hamamatsu, southwest of Tokyo. He attended Keio University where he majored in French. Suzuki also has translated a children's book into Japanese, The Little Sod Diaries by the crime novelist Simon Brett.

Koji Suzuki was born in 1957 in Hamamatsu, southwest of Tokyo. After graduating he held numerous odd jobs, including a stint as a cram school teacher. In 1990, Suzuki's first full-length work, Paradise won the Japanese Fantasy Novel Award and launched his career as a fiction writer. Ring, written with a baby on his lap, catapulted him to fame, and the multi-million selling sequels Spiral and Loop cemented his reputation as a world-class talent.

The image that comes to mind as I think back through reading the three volumes of Koji Suzuki's Ring trilogy is that of a camera quickly panning back to reveal a much wider scene in which the one that filled your screen a moment ago is revealed as a mere cameo. And now you see what it really meant in its unsuspected context!

I love the original Ring books.

I love the original Ring books. I devoured them, watching as the simple world of Ring was transformed into something much larger, and in turn, something much more terrifying and interesting. S feels not like a full continuation, but more of an elongated epilogue. The Ring series have been a high point in international horror fantasy, with elements of psychological suspense, body horror and science fiction mixed with cerebral and humanist storytelling.

Ring (リング, Ringu) is a series of horror novels written by Koji Suzuki. The novels were initially a trilogy, consisting of Ring, Spiral, and Loop. A short story collection called Birthday was released shortly after, introducing extra stories interconnecting the trilogy. Two further books, S and Tide, were published in 2012 and 2013, respectively.

Ring (リング, Ringu) is a Japanese mystery horror novel by Koji Suzuki first published in 1991, and set in modern-day Japan

Ring (リング, Ringu) is a Japanese mystery horror novel by Koji Suzuki first published in 1991, and set in modern-day Japan. The novel was the first in the Ring novel series, and the first of a trilogy, along with two sequels: Spiral (1995) and Loop (1998). The original Ring novel sold 500,000 copies by January 1998, and . million copies by July 2000.

Loop ('Ring' series, Book 3) By Koji Suzuki. Loop (Ring Trilogy) by SUZUKI Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. Suzuki, Koji, Loop (Ring Trilogy), Very Good, Hardcover.

Used availability for Koji Suzuki's Loop. January 1990 : UK Hardback.

Koji Suzuki (鈴木光司 Suzuki Kōji born May 13, 1957) is a Japanese writer, who was born in Hamamatsu and currently lives in Tokyo. Suzuki is the author of the Ring cycle of novels, which has been adapted into a film series. Before he wrote his novel Ring, he already published a novel entitled Paradise. His second novel is Ring. According to Koji Suzuki, his got the inspiration to write his novel Ring from the american horror film entitled "The Poltergeist"

In this conclusion to the Ring series ( the story arc again takes another turn.

The Inspiration for the New Major Motion Picture RINGS Learn the final truth. However, I think Suzuki could be more comparable with Michael Crichton in terms of the science perspectives he laid in the second and third book. In this conclusion to the Ring series ( the story arc again takes another turn.

. Learn the final truth about the Ring!In this much-awaited conclusion of the Ring trilogy, everything you thought you knew about the story will have to be put side. In Loop, the killer mimics both AIDS and cancer in a deadly new guise. Kaoru Futami, a youth mature beyond his years, must hope to find answers in the deserts of New Mexico and the Loop project, a virtual matrix created by scientists. The fate of more than just his loved ones depends on Kaoru's success.Loop is written as a stand-alone work though it is best enjoyed by fans of Ring and Spiral. The author's own favorite of the trilogy, this astounding finale is an emotionally resonant tale that scales conceptual heights from an angle all its own. Fiction about fiction has rarely been so gripping.
Braned
The image that comes to mind as I think back through reading the three volumes of Koji Suzuki's Ring trilogy is that of a camera quickly panning back to reveal a much wider scene in which the one that filled your screen a moment ago is revealed as a mere cameo. And now you see what it really meant in its unsuspected context! Breathtaking! You think you understand the mystery of each book by the end, having earned the relief of penetrating the labyrinth along with the characters--only to find that, no, you were wrong! You hadn't seen more than a fragment.

I was sobered by the ending of The Ring (both American movie and Suzuki's novel). Then Spiral--! What an imagination! Chilling drafts of tomb air a la M.R. James, naturalistic characterization, fascinating science fiction, and what a conclusion! Nothing but Sadako! Where could he possibly go after this? Into the Loop! Another camera pull back! You mean THIS guy is...? And each book so different from the one before it!

I gather the trilogy is the trilogy and that there will be no fourth volume. But what about the hints? That the original psychic-projection and propagation of the Video was too artificial a thing to have occurred in the Loop world without having been planted by someone in the outside world. That the "real" world is a virtual world created by someone less than God. Here's hoping he springs for a fourth.
Vetalol
Amazing book. Perfect conditions. Arrived in time.
Thetahuginn
Great book and arrived on time
DEAD-SHOT
Loop is the conclusion to Koji Suzuki's Ring trilogy. Although each book in the series can be read as a stand alone work, it is best to read the prequels Ring and Spiral to feel the full effect. If you haven't read those before, there is a brief synopsis of both novels to let you in on what has happened.

In truth, the series is more science fiction than horror, with concepts such as DNA sequences and theology touched upon in profound detail. Before reading I had heard that some would claim this book is a rip-off of the Matrix, not true! The only comparison is the idea of different realities, but comparisons stop there. I found near the end to be some surprising plot twists that to some may sound cliche, but are worked in a manner that works beautifully. The conclusion I must say though, is on a more positive note than the previous two books, I'm still contemplating the series even though I finished Loop days ago.
Kakashkaliandiia
This book fails for many, I imagine, because it's more of a science fiction novel than it is a horror novel. However, the same could be said of the second book in this series "Spiral." Some of the visual concepts are quite vivid, and the use of Native American culture I thought was superb. Many have already provided 1 star because they feel it's scattered-brained. To this, I would say that the second book is much more difficult to follow. The narrative is complex because it's the equivalent of "The Matrix." Simulation fiction really throws you for a loop (pun intended), so you should be prepared to suspend some reason, and let Suzuki showcase the final aspect of Sadako!
Gunos
What's not to love about the Ring series? Read all the books!
POFOD
As interesting as the book was at times, it seemed like Suzuki spent a lot of pages convincing the reader of the possibility of his huge plot twist rather than actually developing the story. There was no explanation for how Sadako was to be defeated. And further, if you make a simulation where everything turns out exactly the same as reality, why aren't there copies of everyone within the simulation? Nobody addressed this, why the system produced exact mirrors of species, geographic features, historical events and so on, but somehow not individuals. Also, there was plenty of opportunity, even within this plot, to make things scarier. What was the purpose of Ryoji's strange death? Anyway, the book left quite a bit to be desired. On the plus side, it arrived within 2 days : )
The original Ring movies (Japanese and USA versions) are true original masterpices of horror, as is the orignal Ring novel they are based on. With Spiral, the series moves from its horror roots farther along the spectrum toward science fiction, and that trend culminates in Loop, which has no trace of the wonderful creepiness of Ring.

With Loop we have splattered the windshield of pure science fiction. It isn't spoiling the main plot twist to say that the intellectual foundation of Loop is an artificial life/world concept based on anything from Plato's cave allegory to Buddhism and post-modern literary theory. Also prefigured by William Gibson's 1984 classic, Neuromancer.

But the farther the Ring series has drifted from mundane horror, the more sterile and featureless it has become. Even Spiral had enough evocation of the daily reality of the spooky Japanese scene to feel somewhat real and gritty, somewhat shocking. But Loop is entirely antiseptic. The main character is bland to point of complete unreality (though the author leaves himself an excuse for this flaw, that logical excuse doesn't help the reader's experience at all). You get no feel for the uniquely creepy Japanese horror atmosphere that is so striking in Ring and other recent stuff such as Ju On.

As for possible movie derivatives, I can only say that the movie version of Spiral had already lost most the the momenturm that the book Spiral carried over from Ring (in short, the movie Spiral is very slow and dull). That trend will definitely culminate with any possible movie of Loop (hopefully it won't be made). The characters are cardboard, the settings are bland and boring. The plot has little action. It does have some degree of intellectual interest, however that is too thin a reed to carry the entire plodding narrative. You will pick up a few interesting nuggets of science education.

I don't understand why such a talented author has shyed away from his own greatest strengths. Rather than sticking to or deepening his power to invoke that purely and uniquely creepy Japanese horror atmosphere, he had to get all allegorical and philosophical on us, thereby draining his culminating work of any possible blood and guts. This from the author of such great works as Dark Water and the original Ring.

I don't know if the success of Ring went to his head or if he'd planned out the entire series at the starting gate, before beginning. But I hope he'll return to his real strengths soon.