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eBook Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies: A Novel download
Fiction
Author: Tom De Haven
ISBN: 0805044450
Subcategory: United States
Pages 290 pages
Publisher Henry Holt & Co; 1st edition (June 1, 1996)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 786
ePUB size: 1731 kb
FB2 size: 1280 kb
DJVU size: 1895 kb
Other formats: lit docx doc mbr

eBook Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies: A Novel download

by Tom De Haven


Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies book.

Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies book. At once a rollicking and bittersweet tale of ambition, temptation, and jealousy, De Haven's novel is a tribute to the redemptive powers of love, imagination, and the well-chosen wisecrack.

Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies. Book Two of the Funny Papers Trilogy, De Haven’s dazzling tour of twentieth-century America. New York City, circa 1936: a legendary cartoonist is taken ill with a mysterious ailment. New York City, circa 1936: a legendary cartoonist is taken ill with a mysterious ailment

De Haven's novels include the Funny Paper trilogy (consisting of Funny Papers (1985), Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies (1996) and Dugan Under Ground (2001)).

His recurring subjects include literary and film noir, the Hollywood studio system and the American comics industry. De Haven is noted for his comics-themed novels, including the Derby Dugan trilogy and It's Superman. De Haven's novels include the Funny Paper trilogy (consisting of Funny Papers (1985), Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies (1996) and Dugan Under Ground (2001)). The trilogy's storyline stretches from the beginnings of the newspaper comic strips in the 1890s to the 1970s.

In Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies, Al Bready ghostwrites a popular comic strip and struggles to get along with .

In Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies, Al Bready ghostwrites a popular comic strip and struggles to get along with his boss and mentor, Walter Geebus. A rollicking and bittersweet look at the cutthroat world of professional cartooning, Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies is also a tribute to the redemptive powers of love, imagination, and the well-chosen wisecrack.

Tom De Haven is the author of several novels, including Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies (winner of the 1997 American Book Award) and Funny Papers. A frequent contributor to Entertainment Weekly and The New York Times, he also teaches at Virginia Commonwealth University and is a licensed private investigator.

Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies By Tom De Haven. 290 pp. New York: Metropolitan Books/ Henry Holt & Company. According to Tom De Haven's third novel, "Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies," it's just about everywhere

Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies By Tom De Haven. According to Tom De Haven's third novel, "Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies," it's just about everywhere. This is the message of his novel, set in the New York of the mid-1930's during the heyday of the genre: the poor comic-strip artist has been ("SOCK!!") taking it on the chin from the forces ("I'm gonna SQUASH ya like a BUG!!!") of commerce every bit. as often ("Aiiee! Here they come AGAIN!!!") as his downtrodden brethren in movies, television, advertising and every other pursuit since the Yellow Kid. Derby Dugan's depression funnies. by. De Haven, Tom. Publication date. Large type books, Comic books, strips, etc, Cartoonists, Cartoonists, Comic books, strips, etc, Large type books. England ; USA : Niagara ; Anstey, Leicestershire : . Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 31, 2014.

Did someone poison the bastard-again? Narrated by Al Bready, a lightning-fast author of pulp fiction, this screwball noir is populated by an unforgettable cast of characters, many of whom have good reason to despise Geebus. A wild and bittersweet look at the cutthroat world of professional cartooning, and peculiarly incisive look at Depression-era America.

Advance reading copy. Fine in colorful printed wrappers.

It’s the story of the writer and artist behind Derby Dugan, the fantastically popular newspaper comic strip about a boy in a bright yellow derby who travels around the country getting into adventures, accompanied by his talking dog, Fuzzy, and a magic wallet that always has a ten-dollar bill in it. Derby Dugan isn’t fantastic literature, but it’s about fantastic literature.

Narrated by a fast-talking pulp fiction author, a darkly comic novel set amid New York City's tabloid press of the 1930s follows the frantic search for a replacement for the roguish creator of America's favorite comic strip.
Authis
Remember when comic strips ruled the land? Little Orpan Annie, Flash Gordon, Terry and the Pirates, Derby Dugan...what, you don't remember Derby? Feisty little Sluggo-lookalike, quick tempered, possessor of the magic wallet? Of course you don't remember; he's a fictional creation in this wonderful Depression-era novel by Tom De Haven. Narrated by Derby's writer, the novel captures the flavor of New York City when everyone was reading the funnies, and the many characters inhabiting the city were just as colorful as the strips themselves. Featuring a cover and sample strip by famous Maus creator Art Speigleman, you'll believe you're reading about a real comic strip and its authors...not just the invention of a crafty and gifted writer. A great book
Sironynyr
I discovered Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies in my local library over a decade ago. I've been a fan of old comic strips since I can remember, and have also always enjoyed reading about the cartoonists and writers who worked on such strips, so I was eager to read Tom De Haven's novel.

I didn't expect that I'd fall in love with the book. It wasn't because the subject matter and historic time period and settings were appealing, but because the story and characters are so compelling. The story takes many unpredictable turns, some very funny and others genuinely heartbreaking. Subsequently, I read De Haven's Funny Papers and Dugan Under Ground, which are also terrific reads.

A few years after my first reading of Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies, I read Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, a novel that also features fictional comic book artists and writers. While I found Chabon's story compelling, I had a hard time with the author's "voice," the omniscient narrator who evidenced a better vocabulary than any of his characters (i.e., Chabon had me reaching for a dictionary every several pages, but not because of any words found in dialogue). I don't mean that as a slight to Chabon, just noting that reading his novel made me realize I appreciated De Haven's writing more.

I've read Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies four times, and bought several copies as gifts for for friends. I just picked it up again, got drawn right into it, and decided I was long overdue to write a review for my favorite novel.
Ger
The complex relationship between the two main characters, with its friendship, love, jealousy, and competitiveness, is beautifully constructed, but the story never get tedious or maudlin. The novel has many comic moments and a few heartbreaking moments. Mr. De Haven's ending ties up all the threads in the story so deftly that it left my head spinning. A very impressive book.
Danial
i think i got kicked out because my head was derby's in a rowboat. it's night. or because i said bad things about aol. but..
ohboy ohboy. this is wonderful stuff. i wish there were a real derby dugan now, when ugliness prevails and there is no art at all in the funnies. but it's not the comics, it's the american century past and the shmoes (and shmnoos)who lived it that are so wonderful (and shmoeful), i have been reading these books backwards so am hungering for funny papers, but then i started tolkien in the middle and the books still worked. and unlike so many academics, de haven doesn't let a lot of literature get in the way of his story, yet you still can appreciate that there's some serious writing going on.
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
I enjoyed Tom De Haven's Derby Dugan, but not to the same extent as his Funny Papers. There is more of a dark cloud over the characters in this novel. Yet, although he's no Runyon or P.G. Wodehouse, De Haven creates living characters that you don't mind spending time with.