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eBook City of Saints and Madmen download
Fiction
Author: Jeff VanderMeer
ISBN: 1405033967
Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies
Pages 496 pages
Publisher Tor; New Ed edition (April 2, 2004)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 832
ePUB size: 1695 kb
FB2 size: 1425 kb
DJVU size: 1613 kb
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eBook City of Saints and Madmen download

by Jeff VanderMeer


Home Jeff VanderMeer City of Saints and Madmen. Book upon piled book mentioned in the silvery scrawl and beyond the glass the quiet, slow movements of bibliophiles, feasting upon the genuine articles.

Home Jeff VanderMeer City of Saints and Madmen. City of Saints and Madmen, . It made Dradin forget to breathe, and not simply because this place would have a gift for his dearest, his most beloved, the woman in the window, but because he had been away from the world for a year and, now back, he found the accoutrements of civilization comforted him.

Book upon piled book mentioned in the silvery scrawl and beyond the glass the quiet, slow movements of bibliophiles . You will not be getting back

Book upon piled book mentioned in the silvery scrawl and beyond the glass the quiet, slow movements of bibliophiles, feasting upon the genu-ine articles. You will not be getting back. City of Saints and Madmen has 4 novellas (and a few atmosphere-adding stories in the back) that tell of the history and people of Ambergris, and falls squarely in what some call the new weird.

Книга жанра: Старинная литература, Старинная литература: Прочее. You’ll be familiar, of course, with VanderMeer

Книга жанра: Старинная литература, Старинная литература: Прочее. You’ll be familiar, of course, with VanderMeer. Schomberg’s fat red fingers fondled the notes he had counted. Captain VanderMeer? First mate of The Shriek until she hit that reef. Master of The Frog when he next came back to theIslands. There was a woman involved, I take it? I sipped my vortex water. It was locally made and suspiciously piquant

One of VanderMeer's early successes was his 2001 short-story collection City of Saints and Madmen, set in the imaginary city of Ambergris.

Initially associated with the New Weird literary genre, VanderMeer crossed over into mainstream success with his bestselling Southern Reach Trilogy. One of VanderMeer's early successes was his 2001 short-story collection City of Saints and Madmen, set in the imaginary city of Ambergris. Several of VanderMeer's novels were subsequently set in the same place, including Shriek: An Afterword (2006) and Finch (2009), the latter of which was a finalist for the Nebula Award for Best Novel. In 2000, his novella The Transformation of Martin Lake won the World Fantasy Award.

City of Saints & Madmen: The Book of Ambergris. Perhaps they (and only they) are the saints. 0553383574 (ISBN13: 9780553383577).

Two-time World Fantasy Award winner Jeff VanderMeer has been a finalist for the Hugo Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, the . Dick Award, the International Horror Guild Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and many others. com, Publishers Weekly, San Francisco Chronicle, Los Angeles Weekly, and Locus Magazine. He lives in Tallahassee, Florida, with his wife,.

From Jeff VanderMeer, an author praised by writers such as Laren Beukes, China Miéville and Michael Moorcock, City of Saints and Madmen is by turns sensuous and terrifying.

You’ll be familiar, of course, with VanderMeer. Schomberg’s fat red fingers fondled the notes he had counted

You’ll be familiar, of course, with VanderMeer.

Dradin, in love - The Hoegbotton guide to the early history of Ambergis - The transformation of Martin Lake - The strange case of . .I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today.

frilly night things and frilly day things, and filthily frilly twilight things as well.

Once upon a time, on the banks of the River Moth, a city sprang up like no other in or out of history. Founded on the blood of the original inhabitants after the defeat of the stealthy grey caps, and steeped for centuries in the aftermath of that struggle, Ambergris has become a cruelly beautiful metropolis -- a haven for artists and thieves, for composers and murderers. For anyone privileged to venture there, the name Ambergris conjures up one of the great and unforgettably fantastic cities of contemporary literature. Readers worldwide have become increasingly beguiled by Jeff VanderMeer's strange and ancient metropolis. And for those who have once visited this uniquely complex and comprehensive society, it will remain forever a favourite haunt -- a bustling, grotesque, magnificent, brilliantly realized community full of shocking and beautiful revelations. City of Saints & Madmen collects all of the Ambergris novellas (including the World Fantasy Award winner 'The Transformation of Martin Lake').
Ice_One_Guys
This is truly a jaw dropping book. It is dark. It is comedy. It is surreal. It is weird. It is deep. And, it folds back on itself, in a way. City of Saints and Madmen is not for everyone. In fact, I can think of perhaps two or three friends that would fully enjoy it. Do you like dark, meaningful stories with a twist? Do you like books that fully develop a world (or a city)? Are you OK with shorter stories (novellas)? The first story is kind of disturbing (nothing in here is outright horror). Some may want to put it down after the first story, although you may love it. Please continue to read. He's even got a chapter about squids (yes squids) that is flat out hilarious. Each story is completely different. However, there is a continuing thread. And that is the star of the book: the City (Ambergis). You have read nothing like this book. I promise you. I consider myself an avid reader. This is in my Top 5 all-time.
Cerekelv
OK, important to know that I finished JV's Southern Reach trilogy before I found this. That was a disquieting spectacular romp. This is an earlier work and you can see the infrastructure in style and content building in the material. That said, it's a bit confusing until you realize that these are basically short stories, loosely tied by location and reference. There are whole sections of the book that read as supporting material (glossary, footnotes) that are delightfully OCD and actually a strong part of the content (though I skimmed the glossary, it's full of tongue in cheek or sarcastic barbs and whatnot). It took me a long time to get through, for all those reasons. However, I would not give up as I think Vandermeer has a real talent and this book threw me for a total loop. Twice. I didn't like it as much as the SRT, but I'm going to continue with Finch. Vandermeer has an amazing voice and his writing is true craft.
Yadon
A city exists at a bend in a river. It was once settled by odd grey people but conquerors killed them off and took the city for their own. Weird fungi grow in all corners of the city, and large mushrooms appear suddenly in the street, where you are sure the street was clear that morning. Can mushrooms really grow that fast? Did it… move?

This city is called Ambergris, and the only way to get here is by placing a book by Jeff VanderMeer in the inside pocket of a large overcoat and getting on the #5 train from Chicago to Vernon Hills (though, of course, you won’t find a #5 train listed). You will not be getting back.

City of Saints and Madmen has 4 novellas (and a few atmosphere-adding stories in the back) that tell of the history and people of Ambergris, and falls squarely in what some call “the new weird.” If you like China Miéville, you’ll like this collection. I certainly did.
Kefrannan
i remember years ago hearing about the new weird, and the city weird stories. i'd seen this book several times and just skipped over it. the title seemed like gibberish and the cover art was nothing. well, good news! the cover art is bland, dull, and incredibly boring but that's tinged with a nostalgia for the lush innards it hides. everything inside this book is some of the best stuff i've read in the last fifteen years, if not ever. without giving too much away, in this collection of ...things, we meet ambergris. during some of the things we'll hear tales. sometimes we'll meet people. sometimes it'll just be history. there's even a few pamphlets about tourism and fishing! but all in all, the whole thing feels like a carnival house ride where we just catch glimpses and snippets, every time longing for more. i can honestly say the first third of the book didn't do much for me until i realized where i was and got my bearings. but once i finished the book i dove right back in. i still tell everyone who'll listen to read anything they can by jeff vandermeer - and this is as good as any place to start.
Kerdana
I'm commenting on the Kindle edition specifically. I'd give the book itself an additional star I imagine if I'd bought the printed version, but I did not. The Kindle version is an embarrassing mess. Perhaps it's inevitable - the book itself is clever to a fault, poking fun at all manners of bookishness with footnotes, commentary on illustrations, successive appendices and explanatory material, etc. But the haphazard way in which this is treated in the Kindle version substantially detracts from the reading experience. Some footnotes are hyperlinked, others not, and footnoted material appears in random places in the main text, disrupting the flow of reading. The illustrations and commentary seem jumbled randomly. Some chapters are nearly illegible.

Beyond the meta-textual cleverness, the Kindle conversion is just incredibly sloppy, with all manners of broken words and typos that I suspect do not appear in the printed version.

Buy the printed copy. I wish I had.