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Fiction
Author: Joan Connor
ISBN: 1935248200
Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies
Pages 200 pages
Publisher Leapfrog Press (September 13, 2011)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 535
ePUB size: 1501 kb
FB2 size: 1393 kb
DJVU size: 1642 kb
Other formats: lrf rtf mobi docx

eBook How to Stop Loving Someone (LeapLit) download

by Joan Connor


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How to Stop Loving Someon. Fellowships, Awards and Grants: Fellowships from: Yaddo, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, MacDowell Colony, Vermont Studio Colony Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Award The River Teeth Award in Nonfiction The AWP Award in Short Fiction Pushcart Prize The John Gilgun Award The Ohio Writer award in fiction and nonfiction Ohio Arts Council Individual Artist Fellowship. Joan Connor knows how to plumb our minds and our hearts and leaves us reconcile to the concept that we don't travel this life alone: someone else has likely been there before - and made it. Highly recommended.

Similar books to How to Stop Loving Someone (LeapLit). Connor describes Texas as a place where I can go canoeing and enjoy a refreshing margarita

Similar books to How to Stop Loving Someone (LeapLit). Connor describes Texas as a place where I can go canoeing and enjoy a refreshing margarita. The visual aspect of the settings in Connor's stories is something I admire in this book. This is a story about a woman who falls in love with a delivery man with drives for UPS. This story reinforces my belief that love could be found any where. The title of this book isn't a story.

Joan Connor is a professor at Ohio University and at Fairfield University's low residency MFA program. She received the AWP award for her collection History Lessons, and the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize for The World Before Mirrors. Her two earlier collections are We Who Live Apart and Here on Old Route 7. Short Stories Contemporary Fiction Romance. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

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Start by marking How to Stop Loving Someone (LeapLit) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Joan Connor is a professor at Ohio University and at Fairfield University's low residency MFA program.

leaplit ebook free in PDF and EPUB Format. Looking for love after forty: comic, dark, brassy, intelligent.

Download how to stop loving someone leaplit ebook free in PDF and EPUB Format. Read how to stop loving someone leaplit online, read in mobile or Kindle. The Bookseller And Newsman.

No current Talk conversations about this book. The writing is excellent, but I just don't like short stories.

How can I stop loving someone? Update Cancel. Sometimes you can never stop loving someone, even when your love is unrequited

How can I stop loving someone? Update Cancel. acdZqx rbbqLSyvCEZt GYZDBTccMthwRerYeE AWWtEp rRonSYnRfKSR cFPzNeBo. Sometimes you can never stop loving someone, even when your love is unrequited. When I was living in Korea in the mid-2000s, my mom flew in from Chicago and, besides making our rounds visiting family in Seoul, we had dinner with one of her grammar school classmates.

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This How to Stop Loving Someone (LeapLit) having great arrangement in word and layout, so you will not really feel uninterested in reading. Read Online: How to Stop Loving Someone (LeapLit) PDF. PDF File: How To Stop Loving Someone (LeapLit).

Looking for love after forty: comic, dark, brassy, intelligent.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9781935248200. Release Date:September 2011.

Winner of the 2010 Leapfrog Fiction Contest.

"Excellent and lively. A sharp wit, the apt metaphor, the turn of phrase that pleases and surprises."—Marge Piercy, contest judge

"Bright, brassy, spunky, intelligent. Ingenious writing. . . . Quirky and filled with metaphoric twists that often startle."—Michael Mirolla, contest judge

"Smart, funny, biting, and, above all, touching. A collection to savor over and over."—Michael White, author of Beautiful Assassin

Praise for Joan Connor's previous collections:

"Brilliantly quirky wit and wordplay."—Syndey Lea, author of A Little Wilderness

"A deeply talented writer."—Alyce Miller, author of Water

"Candor, bracing wit, and skewering insight that could kill if she let it."—Rosellen Brown, author of Half a Heart

Joan Connor's collection investigates love and loss, sex, family, and the ways they echo back through memory, sometimes to comfort and sometimes to bite. Some comic, some dark, the stories range from lyrical to laugh-out-loud funny. The title story is a mock self-help manual on how to fall out of love. "Men in Brown" is a rollicking account of a woman infatuated with her UPS man. "Aground" is a dark account of male lust and violence on a lonely island in Maine.

Joan Connor is a professor at Ohio University and at Fairfield University's low residency MFA program. She received the AWP award for her collection History Lessons, and the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize for The World Before Mirrors. Her two earlier collections are We Who Live Apart and Here on Old Route 7.

Onoxyleili
This is a wonderful collection of modern women looking for love, usually after a bad breakup. Not to worrry, help is on the way. The title story is a mannual which lays out just out to "stop loving someone." I needed this book so many bad relationships ago. But I am thankful for it now; and have been sharing it with friends and colleagues! We're ready to get back out there; this wonderful collection gives us a big push forward.
Uriel
"How To Stop Loving Someone" is an excellent collection of stories by Joan Connor. My favorite story is "The Wig". This is a story about how a black wig changes a woman's personality. This wig also causes tension and changes the course of her marriage. Connor sets this story in the beautiful Greek island of Parikia. I love her description of this island. It is a place where I can relax on a nude beach and eat delicious food. "If "It's Bad It Happens To Me" This is about the relationship between room mates. Connor describes Texas as a place where I can go canoeing and enjoy a refreshing margarita. The visual aspect of the settings in Connor's stories is something I admire in this book.

My other favorite story is "Men In Brown". This is a story about a woman who falls in love with a delivery man with drives for UPS. This story reinforces my belief that love could be found any where. The title of this book isn't a story. It is a twelve step guide for women to follow about how to stop loving a man. This is a humorous piece with a clever twist at the end. "The Landmark Hotel" is about a mother and daughter trying to make ends meet. This story features a boarder who complicates things in their relationship. The relationship between these three characters is the appeal of this story.

"Palimpset" is a story about an obituary writer who dreams of becoming an author. I have never read a story about a such a character, so I found the premise of this story to be interesting. "The Fox" is a story about a man and a woman romantically connect on a beach. A fox is an animal that I would not usually associate as a water animal. Connor's creativity shines in this story. "The Folly Of Being Comforted" is about a lonely over worked writer who buys a dog for companionship. I really relate to the character in this story. I like the humor in it too. The stories in this book are moving and funny. I enjoyed them very much.
Saberblade
Joan Connor has a style of writing that is so fine that she makes turning a page to proceed with her next idea a reluctant decision: in other words, her gift for sculpting words is so terse and imaginative that the reader wants to memorize as much of each page as possible, lest the next page might overshadow the current one. Connor writes equally well about the foibles each of us own, the ridiculous situations that can arise in just ploughing through life, the stammering search for the right words at the right time which so often backfires into a shattering and degrading sense of inadequacy - in other words, about humor - as well as she writes about those tender moments of living in response to bruises or unfulfilled dreams or regretting errors of commission as well as omission. Finishing this richly entertaining book of short stories increase the hunger-for-more quotient - or, we always have the option to just go back to the beginning and realize how much detail we missed trying to memorize favorite passages.

Connor has created a mental script in the title story 'How to Stop Loving Someone' that could be taken as a diatribe against men - or as a rapidly absorbed synaptic configuration of what makes people attract and step close to relating, just missing the threshold. It is funny and enlightening. Obsession is a key ingredient in Connor's 'Men in Brown' as she describes her subscription to book clubs and to other items available from shipping houses just so that she can interact or at least spy on the UPS delivery guy, and as usual she knows how to throw a punch at the end that wallops the reader with an unexpected twist. She outlines and copes with guilt in 'The Writing on the Wall', the fragility of casual meetings that lead to email romances and the fallouts of same in 'What It Is', or the strangely injured woman who walks the story of 'Tide Walk'.

No matter the arena of private thoughts that appeal to every reader (or at least lead us to search for stories that will play out those moments from someone else's experiences) they are all (or mostly all) here. Joan Connor knows how to plumb our minds and our hearts and leaves us reconcile to the concept that we don't travel this life alone: someone else has likely been there before - and made it. Highly recommended. Grady Harp, October 11
Konetav
I found this collection of short stories by accident at the library and bought a copy as soon as I finished reading because I kept wanting to highlight certain lines or dog-ear certain pages. I don't know how else to describe it but to say it was VIVID. The characters, their longing, the heart-breaking places in their lives they find themselves in--I haven't been able to stop thinking about them. Connor's prose is awe-inspiring, not just at a sentence level but in the way her story arcs take the most surprising, yet masterful turns to arrive at a point that's beautifully executed. She's witty as hell in one moment and stunningly lyrical in the next. Many times I found myself having to stop before reading the next story because the one I'd just finished left me with so much to think about--I wanted to take it all in.

Also, these days I mostly read novels, but reading this has helped reignite my interest in short stories. I've often thought of novels as old friends; by the time you finish one, you feel like you've known the characters your whole life, and it almost hurts to part ways. But these short stories are like a quick encounter with a stranger who says or does something that speaks to a place deep inside of you; brief yet unforgettable.