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eBook The Cry Of The Dove download
Fiction
Author: Fadia Faqir
ISBN: 0002008343
Publisher HarperCollins Publishers; 1st Edition........ edition (September 25, 2007)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 855
ePUB size: 1511 kb
FB2 size: 1176 kb
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eBook The Cry Of The Dove download

by Fadia Faqir


Other author's books: Golden Chariot

Other author's books: Golden Chariot. The Cry of the Dove: A Novel.

It is a journey that risks everything.

Salma has committed a crime considered punishable by death among her Bedouin tribe of Hima in the Levant: she had sex out of wedlock and became pregnant. It is a journey that risks everything. A timely and lyrical novel, The Cry of the Dove is the story of one youg woman and an evocative portrait of a culture whose reverberations are felt profoundly in our world today.

Leila AboulelaTimely and lyrical, The Cry of the Dove is the story of one young woman and an evocative portrait of forbidden love and violated honor in a culture whose reverberations are felt profoundly in our world today

Leila AboulelaTimely and lyrical, The Cry of the Dove is the story of one young woman and an evocative portrait of forbidden love and violated honor in a culture whose reverberations are felt profoundly in our world today. Salma has committed a crime punishable by death in her Bedouin tribe of Hima, Levant: she had sex out of wedlock and became pregnant. Despite the insult it would commit against her people, Salma has the child and suddenly finds herself a fugitive on the run from those seeking to restore their honor.

Leila Aboulela Timely and lyrical, The Cry of the Dove is the story of one young woman and an evocative portrait of forbidden love and violated honor in a culture whose reverberations are felt profoundly in our world today. Salma has committed a crime punishable by death in her Bedouin tribe of Hima, Levant: she had sex out of wedlock and became Exquisitely woven.

He was stocky but not fat, with thick blond hair, big blue eyes, a wide, thin, almost lipless mouth and wide jaws. She introduced him to me with a voice full of pride, & Mark my fiance!'. She introduced him to me with a voice full of pride, & Mark my fiance!' moved out of the hostel I had not seen Parvin. Months had passed without even a phone call. I was a Bedouin and perhaps she didn't want to be seen with me now she was professional and all. &.Pleased to meet you,' I said and stretched out my arm. He pulled up the sleeve of his jacket and offered me a metal hook instead of a hand made of flesh and blood

Leila AboulelaTimely and lyrical, The Cry of the Dove is the story of one young woman and an evocative portrait of forbidden love and violated honor in a culture whose reverberations are felt profoundly in our world today.

Her captivating new novel deals with the timeless themes of unforgiveness, friendship, and travel. Exquisitely woven, laced with humor and social awareness, it hums with the futility of erasing the past. 4 people found this helpful.

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She gained her BA in English Literature from the University of Jordan, Amman, before going in 1984 to Britain where she completed an MA in creative writing at Lancaster University. The University of East Anglia awarded her the first P. in Creative and Critical Writing in 1990

The English doctor tells Salma that she must forget her past. But how can she when it has followed her all the way from her tiny Bedouin village to this place in England “where the river meets the sea”? Salma has violated the laws of her tribe by becoming pregnant before marriage; to restore their honour, the villagers must kill her. Salma is imprisoned for her own protection, her baby torn from her arms. Years later, when it seems her persecutors have given up the chase, Salma is smuggled out of prison and finds exile in Exeter, England. But now, living by her Immigrant Survival Guide, Salma finds a prison of another kind. Trying to navigate the cultural divide between a permissive and often racist contemporary Western society and her traditional tribal Muslim upbringing, Salma perseveres and creates a new life. But the cries of her lost child will not be silenced; she is driven to return to her childhood village in a shattering journey that will change everything—and nothing.

Slipping seamlessly between the olive groves of the Levant and the rain-slicked streets of England, Cry of the Dove is a searing novel of forbidden love, violated honour and a woman’s courage in the face of insurmountable odds.

Waiso
This is the book you read the info about, and think "Wow, sounds interesting, I can't wait!" But dear readers, ohhhh must you be patient with this novel. Written in what can be described as a try hard-format of differentiation (each paragraph in the novel is from a different time place of the protagonist's life), reading this novel is life trying to watch two shows alternating every two minutes. The plot itself, going back to the main line, is interesting and the ideas Faqir had were thought-provoking (albeit we witness bias and the tinting of perspectives). But again, the book was carried out so poorly, the main enjoyment of understanding and connecting with the character was lacking, and left me feeling disconnected at the end of the novel, a scene if written properly, should have invoked emotion and tears. Two stars were given because the outline of the story was alright—everything else made reading it simply unbearable.
Onath
The story line switched for scene to scene and back and forth in time. I was unable to become engaged in the book . The plot was slow and Imskimmed the last part of the book just to,catch the highlights.
Briciraz
I picked up The Cry of the Dove at the State College AAUW book sale, and not being familiar with the author, I think it must have been the striking cover that caught my attention. Salma is a Bedouin Arab in Jordan who has sex out of wedlock and gets pregnant. Denied by her lover, she is taken away into protective custody to have the baby. Essentially, protective custody means prison, and it's necessary for Salma to protect her from an honor killing by her brother or father. Her daughter is taken away from her as soon as she's born, and Salma remains in prison for six more years before a nun arranges with the prison to take her away after a midnight release. She's spirited out of the country and eventually to England. Salma changes her name to Sally and lives an impoverished existence, first in a hostel and later renting a room from a drunken elderly woman. She gets a job as an assistant tailor and dreams of returning to get her daughter. The narrative goes back and forth among many time periods, from the time when she met her lover, to prison, to her early existence in England, to the present. As the characters and story develops it becomes clear how devastating life is for someone who loses her family, not to violence or death, but through ostracism and indifference. This sad story is all the worse for it being true to real life.
GoodLike
I was seduced into reading this book by the lovely cover picture of a blue mosque by a reflecting pool. The actual locales, however, are far from such splendor. The protagonist, Salma, comes from a Bedouin tribe that punishes premarital sex with death. Fearful of her life, she escapes to police custody and is imprisoned in a sordid jail for her own protection. Rescued by nuns after several years, she finds asylum in England, living near the tracks in Exeter while she scrapes a living in low-level immigrant jobs and tries to improve her English.

All this is conveyed in outline in the first few chapters of the book, whose short sections read like picking through a pile of picture postcards spanning twenty years and two continents. Many of the descriptions are moving and effective, lyrical and stark by turns, and the jumping around in time should be familiar to all but the most literal readers. The real problem of the book is the lack of a consistent voice for Salma herself. Partly, this is a matter of language. We see Salma struggling to learn her first words of English; we see her later with enough knowledge to take an Open University course in literature; but the book is very vague about what happens to her in the middle. The flowing language of the first-person narrative clashes with the elementary mistakes that Salma makes in speaking, giving us little sense of her painful progress from one tongue to another.

In terms of factual description, though, the account of Salma's years in Exeter working as a seamstress and barmaid does have a certain grim realism, but it is rather stagnant. By contrast, Salma's memories of her early life begin to seem too impossibly idyllic, and she takes to romanticizing her future in a series of make-believe letters to various unreachable recipients, inventing a wish-fulfillment version of her life. The things that presumably really do happen in the last few chapters are scarcely more believable, unprepared and coming out of nowhere. And the very end of the book is like a slap in the face of the reader.

This is one of a number of recent novels dealing with the situation of Islamic immigrant women in Britain and the irresistible pull of the home country; some are even listed among the suggestions for further reading at the back of the book. In my personal order of preference, I would cite THE TRANSLATOR by Leila Aboulela, SWEETNESS IN THE BELLY by Camilla Gibb, THE SAFFRON KITCHEN by Yasmin Crowther, and BRICK LANE by Monica Ali. Despite its many incidental pleasures, I am not convinced that THE CRY OF THE DOVE adds enough to works like these to make it worth buying.
Impala Frozen
I found this an incredibly engaging and emotionally moving account of a young Arab woman trapped between the incredibly mysogynist Middle East and the incredibly racist culture of London. The author very realistically portrays the mental state of a woman who has undergone the trauma of being imprisoned to protect her from an honor killing, as well as a disfiguring skin condition and being violently uprooted from her close knit traditional community. The main character drifts dreamily in and out of a vividly remembered past and supportive and exploitive relationships - as well as dissociative states where she is supersensitive to smells and believes she hears the daughter she gave up calling her in distress. She doesn't plan for the future and doesn't problem solve or make decisions. Rather she floats along wherever circumstances take her. Her inability to become rooted in her new life in London make the surprise ended totally believable.

I found the descriptions of nomadic life among the Bedouins riveting. Likewise the descriptive detail regarding the lower middle class neighborhoods Salma frequents in London rivals that of Henry Miller or George Orwell.

A very competent writer and a great read.

by Dr Stuart Jeanne Bramhall, author of THE MOST REVOLUTIONARY ACT: MEMOIR OF AN AMERICAN REFUGEE.