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eBook The Telling download
Fiction
Author: Ursula K. LeGuin
ISBN: 0441011233
Subcategory: Literary
Publisher Ace; Reissue edition (July 29, 2003)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 940
ePUB size: 1987 kb
FB2 size: 1545 kb
DJVU size: 1747 kb
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eBook The Telling download

by Ursula K. LeGuin


FYI: Le Guin is the winner of several Nebula and Hugo awards for outstanding SF, as well as of a National Book Award, a Pushcart Prize, a Newbery Honor and the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement.

FYI: Le Guin is the winner of several Nebula and Hugo awards for outstanding SF, as well as of a National Book Award, a Pushcart Prize, a Newbery Honor and the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement.

Le Guin told the Guardian that JK Rowling could have been more generous in acknowledging the 1968 novel. According to a profile of Le Guin by the novelist Hari Kunzru, the book is still circulated in activist communities, with young anarchists approaching the author for advice.

The telling/Ursula Le Guin. Only one Word, only one Book. All other words, all other books were darkness, error. p cm. ISBN 0-15-100567-2.

Ursula K. Le Guin book. For the first time, all of Ursula K. Le Guin’s Hainish novels and. In The Telling (2000), Sutty, an observer of the interplanetary confederation known as the Ekumen, has been sent to Aka to investigate why the planet has almost entirely lost its vital oral traditions and spiritual beliefs in the span of a single generation.

When reading Le Guin's books, I'm often fooled into thinking that the story is only reaching my brain. The Locus Sci-Fi, 2001 winner, was Ursula Le Guin’s The Telling, part of her Hainish Cycle which, at time of writing, stands at 13 works (none of which I had previously read). Her best known work is the Earthsea Cycle (which I also hadn’t read), and the only book of Le Guin’s which I had read was Lavinia (which didn’t exactly grabbed me). So I had low expectation when I started. You might think I must have really hated this book to give it 1-star.

The Telling is a 2000 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin set in her fictional universe of Hainish Cycle. The Telling is Le Guin's first follow-up novel set in the Hainish Cycle since her 1974 novel The Dispossessed

The Telling is a 2000 science fiction novel by Ursula K. The Telling is Le Guin's first follow-up novel set in the Hainish Cycle since her 1974 novel The Dispossessed

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Once a culturally rich world, the planet Aka has been utterly transformed by technology. Records of the past have been destroyed.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

All rights reserved That same night she told Mother and Father that she wanted to study at the Training School, to try to qualify for the Ekumenical College.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted. That same night she told Mother and Father that she wanted to study at the Training School, to try to qualify for the Ekumenical College. Told them very timidly, and found them undismayed, not even surprised. This seems a rather good world to get off of, at present, Mother said.

All other words, all other books were darkness, error.

The day I was born I made my first mistake, and by that path have I sought wisdom ever since. Let the Lord shine out! cried the pilots in their white uniforms and mirror-masks, back at the church at Colorado Base, facelessly facing the cameras and the singing, swaying crowds in ecstasy.

The Telling - Ursula K. Le Guin. Set in Le Guin's Hainish universe, a young woman from a future Earth, where she has lived underneath a repressive, fundamentalist religious government, travels to the planet of Aka, where religion has been outlawed by a different type of repressive government. I was so looking forward to reading this book, as it is the only one of the novels set in the.

Once a culturally rich world, the planet Aka has been utterly transformed by technology. Records of the past have been destroyed, and citizens are strictly monitored. But an official observer from Earth will discover a group of outcasts who still practice its lost religion-the Telling. Intrigued by their beliefs, she joins them on a sacred pilgrimage into the mountains...and into the dangerous terrain of her own heart, mind, and soul.

Arith
Listening to this novel as a audiobook made it very real to me. I haven't read the book in hard copy. Usually I read hard copy and then listen to an audio version. I am reluctant to read the book for fear it might diminish my full appreciation of this reading. The reading is excellent. The story, as have been all of Le Guin's stories which I have read, was deeply moving.
ZEr0
Ursula LeGuin has created a universe, in her Hainish series, in which the millennia-old wisdom and tolerance of one ancient species provides a perspective with which other cultures can be evaluated dispassionately, and in which a series of other cultures provide subjects well worthy of such evaluation, and themselves serve as a mirror on our own society. In masterpieces such as The Dispossessed, The Left Hand of Darkness, and The Word for World is Winter, she uses these invented societies to offer a deep perspective on feminism, gender, militarism, and more

In The Telling, LeGuin turns her focus to religious fanaticism. Needless to say, she doesn't think much of it. The protagonist grew up on an Earth in the last stage of an era of fanaticism that will look all too familiar to many modern Americans, and is now a diplomat serving on a world that is very different, but no less fanatical, than the world of her youth. LeGuin sheds a gentle light on why people embrace fundamentalism, and the forces behind its rise and fall. It's not an overwhelming masterpiece like The Dispossesed, but it's still a great and thought-provoking read.

I'd recommend The Telling for anyone who is already a LeGuin fan, and in particular a fan of her Hainish novels. If that doesn't describe you, I'd recommend starting with either The Dispossessed or The Left Hand of Darkness, and moving on to The Telling if, like me, you simply can't get enough of the world she's created.
Freighton
Technology/ consumer driven society vs. the past.

Interesting story about the past has being deleted by technology/ consumerism.

We were afraid of such society as we only embraced new things.

But with the vintage trend and hipsters bringing back old ways, thankfully, a society where technology is valued

seems a bit farther away (whew...).
Ironfire
In "The Telling", as well as in all her books, Le Guin unveils a whole civilisation, its religion and language, its customs and practices. This is its strong point.
Also, the book has an LGBT aspect. The protagonist is a lesbian who has fled formerly Theocratic Earth. Living in modern Aka, a modernist yet homophobic regime, she finally discovers the Old Aka's liberal attitube towards same-same couples who even have the freedom to join the clergy.
It is mostly a book about religion and oppression, topics that are still relevant today. Even when I read the final page, I wanted to keep on reading. Overall, a great book and a pleasant read.
Yahm
Poetic, moving, sensitive and, in her typically gentle way, didactic, is how I felt while reading and after finishing The Telling. As it has been ever since The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed, LeGuin's SF is not just a good story but tries to tell us something about ourselves and the cultural-political-economic state of the present. This novel also has a journey in it that reminds me of the glacial trek of Genly Ai in The Left Hand of Darkness, through a mystical mountain wilderness, while the protagonist is being pursued by a representative of the world's dominating corporate culture. Are the comparisons with our own corporate culture obvious and caricatured? Are intolerance and religious fanaticism portrayed negatively? Yes, and all to the better. Is LeGuin lecturing us? Maybe, but because her prose is so beautiful, her characters so interesting and full, her alien world so well-rounded and diverse, her world's native, highly literate, non-corporate way of life so appealing and its destroyers so depressingly like those of our own world, that I sat through the entire lecture not caring that I was being taught a lesson.
My favorite author went back to her SF roots and gave us a novel that I will treasure forever.
Nejind
Fine character, Sutty, and fascinating potential for the concept, but the story bogged down in the last quarter and eventually fizzled out in my opinion.
Justie
It is not often that I read a science fiction that is Taoist in character. I am also reading her translation of the Tao Te Ching, and they say much the same thing. The ancient religion on this planet is non-judgmental, non-theistic. Its focus is much on living in the moment and accepting what is happening.
The book is as much about our present world as about the imaginary world. Could the right wing fundamentalists become Unists and destroy the world? Only if allowed. Is there a move to the world of the maz? I think so, though it is not big or overly popular. Many have taken up meditation, and much of New Thought out of the late 19th Century and New Age from the late 20th Century tend to that. On the other hand, the secularization of Europe and its turn from religion -- fueled frequently by the scandals of the Roman Catholic church and the callousness with which it has been handled -- could lead to a spiritless and bureaucratized Europe perhaps presaged by the mindless bureaucracy of the European Union.
This is a lovely, delightful book. It is not a zininging pseudo-military adventure, but a quiet walk in the forest. Enjoy.
I wish that Le Guin's "Hainish Cycle" went on as long as the endless "telling" at the heart of this wondrous novel! Le Guin is like no other writer I know. I love her dearly.