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Fiction
Author: Charlotte Goodwin,Charlotte Bronte
ISBN: 0140861807
Subcategory: Literary
Publisher Penguin Audio; Abridged edition (July 1, 1997)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 737
ePUB size: 1132 kb
FB2 size: 1627 kb
DJVU size: 1384 kb
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eBook Shirley (Penguin Classics) download

by Charlotte Goodwin,Charlotte Bronte


Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), English writer noted for her novel Jane Eyre (1847), sister of Anne Bronte and Emily Bronte.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), English writer noted for her novel Jane Eyre (1847), sister of Anne Bronte and Emily Bronte. The three sisters are almost as famous for their short, tragic lives as for their novels. The collection of poems, Poems By Currer, Ellis And Acton Bell (1846), which Charlotte wrote with her sisters, sold only two copies.

Read by the actor Juliet Stevenson. About the book: 'Alas, Experience! No other mentor has so wasted and frozen a face as yours: none wears a robe so black, none bears a rod so heavy. Struggling manufacturer Robert Moore has introduced labour saving machinery to his Yorkshire mill, arousing a ferment of unemployment and discontent among his workers.

Robert considers marriage to the wealthy and independent Shirley Keeldar to solve his financial woes, yet his heart lies with his cousin Caroline, who, bored and desperate, lives as a dependent in her uncle's home with no prospect of a career

Lucasta Miller (Introducer). Robert considers marriage to the wealthy and independent Shirley Keeldar to solve his financial woes, yet his heart lies with his cousin Caroline, who, bored and desperate, lives as a dependent in her uncle's home with no prospect of a career. Shirley, meanwhile, is in love with Robert's brother, an impoverished tutor - a match opposed by her family.

Jane Eyre (Penguin Classics) by Bronte, Charlotte Paperback Book The Cheap Fast. Shirley (Penguin Popular Classics), Bronte, Charlotte, Very Good Book. Was: Previous price£5. Villette (Penguin Classics), Charlotte Bronte, Very Good Book. Villette (Penguin Popular Classics), Bronte, Charlotte, Very Good Book.

Shirley, Charlotte Brontë Shirley, A Tale is an 1849 social novel by the English novelist Charlotte Brontë. It was Brontë's second published novel after Jane Eyre (originally published under Brontë's pseudonym Currer Bell)

Shirley, Charlotte Brontë Shirley, A Tale is an 1849 social novel by the English novelist Charlotte Brontë. It was Brontë's second published novel after Jane Eyre (originally published under Brontë's pseudonym Currer Bell). The novel is set against a backdrop of the Luddite uprisings in the Yorkshire textile industry.

Shirley, A Tale is a social novel by the English novelist Charlotte Brontë, first published in 1849. It was Brontë's second published novel after Jane Eyre (originally published under Brontë's pseudonym Currer Bell)

Shirley, A Tale is a social novel by the English novelist Charlotte Brontë, first published in 1849. The novel is set against the backdrop of the Luddite uprisings in the Yorkshire textile industry.

T. Nelson & Sons. Gift, indeed! I mistook thechapter, and book, and Testament-gospel for law, Acts for Genesis, thecity of Jerusalem for the plain of Shinar. It was no gift but theconfusion of tongues which has gabbled me deaf as a post.

com Penguin Classics - The Juvenilia of Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte. Villette by Charlotte Bronte paperback Book Classic.

Penguin Classics - The Juvenilia of Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte. Make Offer - Villette by Charlotte Bronte paperback Book Classic. Shirley By Charlotte Bronte 1911 Book. Make Offer - Shirley By Charlotte Bronte 1911 Book.

Looking for books by Charlotte Brontë? . Popular Series By Charlotte Brontë. Life and Works of Charlotte Bronte and Her Sisters: Shirley, by C. Bronte.

Looking for books by Charlotte Brontë? See all books authored by Charlotte Brontë, including Jane Eyre, and Villette, and more on ThriftBooks. Books by Charlotte Brontë. Complete Novels of Charlotte and Emily Brontë. Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights.

Robert Moore, Bronte's hero, is a Yorkshire mill owner determined to make Hollow's Mill a success with new machinery. Although he loves Caroline Helstone, he pursues the heiress Shirley Keeldar, a passionate and unconventional woman who would scorn to marry for mere social advantage. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, a time of hunger, unemployment, social unrest, and Luddite riots, Shirley affirms the value of feeling and imagination in a world that seeks to deny them. Caroline Helstone personifies the dilemmas of Victorian women, while in Shirley, Bronte draws a portrait of her free-spirited sister Emily. 4 cassettes.
ladushka
Although this book did not receive the same the same acclaim as did Charlotte Bronte's masterpiece Jane Eyre, I thought it to be a very compelling novel. It is written around the theme of the modernization of the textile mills in Yorkshire at mid 19th century. It deals with the gulf between "haves" and "have-nots" and the single minded materialism of most of the mill owners and managers. Woven into this, and probably the main message of the book, is the plight of the women of the day, especially the "old maids" and those who entered into loveless marriages in order to escape the "old maid" role or because their social class and/or wealth or lack of it demanded marriage with a man of equal or superior status. Miss Bronte, as in Jane Eyre, does an excellent job of character development. Perhaps the reason that her readers and critics did not rate this novel as high as her other one is that it contains long soliloquies or journal entries by some of the characters where their intimate thoughts are revealed in a somewhat poetic manner that can become rather boring. However, this makes up a minor part of the book. I found myself skimming these sections. Miss Bronte starts this book by a first chapter in which she paints a graphic and unfavorable picture of three curates. These curates are minor characters in the book, but they come into play quite a few times in the story. Miss Bronte draws her information from her life experience as a clergyman's daughter, and I am led to believe that it is this unpopular picture of the curates that gave her novel Shirley a less popular rating in its day. Some of these curates are judged to have been modeled on real-life curates who served her father from time to time. This chapter was objected to by the publisher's reader who had had the discernment to see the value of Jane Eyer. By the time Shirley was submitted, Miss Bronte's fame as a novelist had been established, and so Shirley was accepted for publication in spite of its detractions. It is interesting to note that in that day, the name, Shirley, was considered to be a masculine name.

The main characters of the story are two young women, one a "have" and the other a middle class "have-not." I also understand that this is the first time that the plight of the single woman is dealt with in Victorian literature, and that that in itself was a daring and controversial subject. The modern reader, especially a woman, can not help but rejoice in how far we as women have progressed socially since that time, but the theme of unemployment, the rich getting richer and the laborers receiving an unequal share of the profits, etc. sounds like today's news. Even with its problems, this novel is head and shoulders above many others of its day.
Musical Aura Island
Bronte's Shirley was written two years after Jane Eyre took Victorian England by storm. Some reviews were harsh and those who cared for the beloved author took care to hide reviews which might bring tears to her eyes.

Shirley is entirely different from Jane Eyre. Set during the Napoleonic wars, it focuses on a group of individuals, instead of one heroine like she did in Jane Eyre.

If you are a devoted Bronte fan like myself, I urge you to not let the first few chapters keep you from the gold that is not far behind. The first half of the book is rather trying. One begins to wonder why the novel was entitled Shirley since no such character appears until a few hundred pages. Instead, the novel focuses on a pair of rude and gossipy curates and the troubles of mill owner Robert Moore. It takes a while, but slowly all players in the novel are gradually introduced.

The character of Shirley Keedlar was in fact inspired by Charlotte Bronte's sister, Emily, author of Wuthering Heights. Shirley is a beautiful but fiery heiress who bewitches and impacts many lives throughout the novel. Bronte claimed that Shirley Keedlar lives the life that Emily might have lived had she been happy and healthy.

As I read the book, I attempted to piece together which characters were inspired by Bronte's real aquaintances. It is well known that the characters in Shirley were inspired from a small pool of people Charlotte Bronte socialized with. When her novel was released, many people recognized themselves in the novel, she was highly embarassed, but most of the people who inspired the characters found it all very amusing.

I was not wrong when I assumed that Caroline Helston, an orphan living with her uncle in a desolate parsonage has a little bit of Charlotte in her. Caroline secretly loved her cousin, Robert Moore, who unaware of her feelings, hurts her deeply by his aloofness.

The first part of the book was a little dull, but at one point in the novel it becomes impossible to put down. Bronte fans will see so much of our beloved novelist in Caroline that you won't be able to resist losing your heart to her.

When Charlotte Bronte began writing this novel, she found it incredibly difficult to write. However, the death of her brother and sisters left a void that only writing could fill. This becomes apparent in the heartfelt manner the last half of the book was written. Jane Eyre is most Bronte fans favorite novel, but Charlotte found Shirley superior to Jane Eyre. The latter is still my favorite, but anyone who is a fan of Jane Eyre must read this wonderful novel, which was written during such an emotional time in Charlotte Bronte's life.
Bukus
The first three or so chapters of this could have been cut out an no one would have missed them. The ending felt rushed like the author got bored with the story. However, most of the book was rich with vivid depictions of human character. I enjoyed this book and am glad that Kelsey is introducing me to so many classic authors.
Leceri
While not in the same league as her masterpiece, the intense and riveting Jane Eyre, Shirley is nevertheless a marvelously executed time, and is far superior to Bronte's rather insular Villette. With Shirley, set toward the end of the Napoleonic Wars, she demonstrates a clear-eyed familiarity with class divisions and labor strife as well as gender roles. These serve as an ever-present backdrop to developing personal interrelationships of her characters, each of whom are rendered with typical Bronesque detail and humor.
Flower
Really great fun to read this novel, althoughby modern standards,it is, perhaps, a somewhat rambling tale. Great dissection and discussion of the roles open to women and attitudes towards women in England. Interesting reflections about political issues of the early 19thC feel surprisingly fresh. Characters are engaging and complex. Reveals many prejudices about class and race, even chilling notions, about the First Nations of North America.