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eBook Cherries in the Snow: A Novel of Lust, Love, Loss, and Lipstick download
Fiction
Author: Emma Forrest
ISBN: 140005365X
Subcategory: Humor & Satire
Pages 288 pages
Publisher Three Rivers Press; Uncorrected Advance Proof edition (January 25, 2005)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 702
ePUB size: 1896 kb
FB2 size: 1865 kb
DJVU size: 1555 kb
Other formats: mobi rtf docx txt

eBook Cherries in the Snow: A Novel of Lust, Love, Loss, and Lipstick download

by Emma Forrest


Emma Forrest's 3rd novel "Cherries in the Snow" is brilliant! . The cover of "Cherries in the Snow" sums up the book pretty well. Reminiscent of a minimalist makeup ad, feminine, colorful yet a bit wink-nudge.

Emma Forrest's 3rd novel "Cherries in the Snow" is brilliant! The writing is crisp, edgy, down-to-earth, clever and memorable. Ms. Forrest has finally created a character to care about. Sadie Steinberg is a very real character. Three dimensional and flesh and blood. While reading the novel I felt myself cringe a few times at some stupid thing Sadie does and I know it's because she's real. Much like the book itself.

A color name like Revlon's famous Cherries in the Snow. These are some of the lipsticks offered by Grrrl cosmetics, colors that every hip young woman in the city just has to have. Sadie's own lip color changes with her mood: pink when she's feeling girlish, orangey brown when she's feeling sentimental, none at all when she's in love, and traffic-stopping red, painted in a perfect bow, when she's ready to end a relationship. In addition to her love of lipsticks, Sadie also has a penchant for much older men-none of whom ever measure up to her father and none she ever wants to stick around that long.

Cherries in the Snow book. These are some of the lipsticks offered by Grrrl cosmetics, colors that every hip young woman in the city just has to have

Cherries in the Snow book. Every Girl Needs Her Signature Color. Sadie, a twenty-something Brit living in New York City, has the enviable job of creating these catchy names- Every Girl Needs Her Signature Color.

Cherries in the Snow A Novel of Lust, Love, Loss, and Lipstick.

This witty, wise novel is the tale of Sadie, a young woman with a serious penchant for older men-who finally grows up once she takes the girliest of jobs-naming colors at a makeup company.

In Sadie's head, she's a novelist. This witty, wise novel is the tale of Sadie, a young woman with a serious penchant for older men-who finally grows up once she takes the girliest of jobs-naming colors at a makeup company.

Cherries in the Snow is a novel about womanhood, love, and lipstick. I remember Holly’s mother’s makeup table, a Chinese dresser dotted with mascaras and lipsticks that the maid would clean with a thin feather duster, leaving the makeup undisturbed like a crime scene. Flippant, sexy, acid and smart, this is Emma Forrest at her most dazzling. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. The Avilars’ maid was white and around her the family would chat in Spanish. There were a lot of Japanese brands on that dresser, slimmer, more minimalist than my mother’s gaudy, chemical-scented pearlescents.

Real love could just be too grown up for he. herries in the Snow is a novel about womanhood, love, and lipstick. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Cherries in the Snow is a brittle novel overrun by unlikable characters who are affluent, thoughtless, achingly cool and inclined towards cruelty. Sadie is up there with the other disagreeables, self-absorbed, brattish and manipulative, forever locking herself in other people's bathrooms to weep dramatically. Yet Forrest's taut prose makes this a likable book. It has pace, energy and eccentric, valid observation. And it has Emma Forrest's voice - flippant, irreverent and modern. Cherries in the snow : a novel of lust, love, loss, and lipstick, Emma Forrest. Forrest, Emma author. Publication Information. New York : Three Rivers Press.

I was waiting half an hour, not that she is late, but because I wanted to be out of my room and I was so excited to be leaving. I was killing time, hanging around the hotel shop looking at fifty-dollar bubble bath. I think that’s why I know nothing. Every time I went on a school field trip to a museum, I just wanted to go to the gift store. If there was a dinosaur skeleton in front of me, I only wanted a postcard of the dinosaur skeleton

Every Girl Needs Her Signature Color . . .Jailbait. Mystic Jukebox. Ass-Slapping Pink. Say Hello (and Wave Good-bye). Born to Run. These are some of the lipsticks offered by Grrrl cosmetics, colors that every hip young woman in the city just has to have. Sadie, a twenty-something Brit living in New York City, has the enviable job of creating these catchy names—and she’s good at it. What Sadie really wants, however, is to find the perfect moniker for Grrrl’s signature color, a color that will be loved by generations of women. A color name like Revlon’s famous Cherries in the Snow.Sadie’s own lip color changes with her mood: pink when she’s feeling girlish, orangey brown when she’s feeling sentimental, none at all when she’s in love, and traffic-stopping red, painted in a perfect bow, when she’s ready to end a relationship. In addition to her love of lipsticks, Sadie also has a penchant for much older men—none of whom ever measure up to her father and none she ever wants to stick around that long. Enter Marley, a mysterious organic-food-eating, yoga-practicing graffiti artist close to her own age, who shows up in the Grrrl office one snowy day. . . . Sadie falls hard, and so does he. But Marley isn’t just devoted to Sadie; he also has a daughter, Montana, a precocious, possessive little girl who competes with Sadie for her daddy’s affections. This bizarre triangle is at the heart of Cherries in the Snow—a witty and sometimes dark saga of sex, the city, and the search for love . . . and the perfect red lipstick—from one of today’s most daring writers of fiction.
playboy
The description read "slight wear and tear" when it should have been "extensive water damage". Granted, the book was cheap but the description was dishonest.
Mall
Journalist/author/screenwriter Emma Forrest writes like the girl next door... if the girl next door is a savvy, sharp gal with encyclopedic pop culture knowledge. Her third novel continues the offbeat characters and dark, quirky writing. "Cherries in the Snow" is a bit like its namesake -- bright and engaging.

Sadie Steinberg is a British twentysomething living in New York, and employed at chic Grrl Cosmetics. Her job? She comes up with the kicky nicknames for makeup, like "Ass-Slapping Pink" and "Born To Run," (yes, I'd love that job too) and aspires to create a name as memorable as "Cherries in the Snow." Lipstick is also a barometer for her moods. Some people wear their hearts on their sleeves, but Sadie wears hers on her mouth.

Then her love life takes a radical shift, after way too many "father figure" men (Dr. Freud, you may now leave the stage) who are twice her age. One day Sadie encounters hippie-esque graffiti artist Marley, and they fall in love. But Sadie has a rival for his affections: his young daughter Montana, who eerily reminds Sadie of herself.

Sounds like your typical chick-lit? Trust me, it's not -- at least, it's not the fluffy twenty-something-woman-in-love stuff that is churned out on a monthly basis. Emma Forrest is far wittier and more flippant, sort of like if Nick Hornby had been born a girl. To dismiss "Cherries in the Snow" as "chick-lit" is a disservice of the worst kind.

Forrest's writing has grown up a bit since her debut novel, "Namedropper." There are echoes of her earlier work -- Holly in particular reminds one of sexy, free-spirited Treena -- but Forrest's writing has become a bit deeper over time. Here, she's taking a harder look at friendships, love affairs, and dating men with children.

But if her themes have gotten deeper, Forrest hasn't lost her knack for acidic observation. Or, for that matter, her ability to steep her books in pop culture without making them seem trendy or gimmicky. On the subject of Holly, Sadie muses that "you have that intense, romantic love for your best friend and if it ends, the breakup is absolutely traumatizing." Insights like those can cut like a knife.

The cover of "Cherries in the Snow" sums up the book pretty well. Reminiscent of a minimalist makeup ad, feminine, colorful yet a bit wink-nudge. Much like the book itself.
hardy
Sadie Steinberg is a 24 year old English girl working in NYC at her friend's cosmetic company. Her job is to name all of the products. Sadie seems to always find herself with the wrong (older) man until she meets 28 year old Marley. Then, she finds out he has an 8 year old daughter. Sadie is forced to act like an adult if she wants things to work out. Slowly, with tons of mini breakdowns and twists along the way, she realized that she does and that Marley is her knight - in spray paint- and Montana (the girl) is pretty okay too.

This book was an easy read, but really a bit of a mess in terms of plot and character development. Sadie's whole fascination with older men made no sense since her dad was great and still married to her mother. Montana was a caricature, as was her mom. Most annoying was Sadie's constant crying and whining. I almost hoped that Marley would dump her and smack his kid into some semblance of normalcy.
nailer
Don't let the cover or title fool you into thinking this is chick lit. Chick lit heroines may bewail calories but they rarely talk about the orgasmic properties of bulimia and they certainly don't self-mutilate. If you've read Forrest's memoir Your Voice in My Head: A Memoir, you will certainly wonder how much of Sadie's story is biographical but that doesn't matter when you write with such a clever, self-deprecating hand. And what Gen X girl hasn't wanted to be 'the person who makes up the names for lipsticks'? It's all a bit theraputic and I've gone straight on to Thin Skin
Linn
There's not a whole lot if anything to recommend about "Cherries In The Snow" by Emma Forrest. It's really a big snore. The situations are uninteresting, the conversations between characters are stilted and disjointed and the conflicts are dull. The characters themselves are woefully underdeveloped, especially that of Marley, protagonist Sadie Steinberg's boyfriend. He is so sappy, bland and, despite Sadie's description of him possessing black hair, brown eyes and brown skin he seems colorless. Who is this guy? What makes him tick? And why on Earth does he love Sadie, who is so shallow and annoying? Their relationship is completely unbelievable. So too unbelievable is Marley's young daughter Montana. Author Forrest would seem never to have encountered an eight-year old girl, so unrealistic and fake is this character. Really, the whole book is a mess. How did this book ever get published?
Bort
Sadie Steinberg is a transplanted Brit living in New York City, with the fun job of naming new products for an edgy cosmetic company. She's also one of the most endearing heroines of the chick lit genre. She's goofy and childish and occasionally, even gross, but she totally captures your imagination and you wish you really knew someone like her.

Cherries in the Snow will stay in your mind long after you've read the last page. I loved it, and I've just bought my own copy so I will be able to read it over and over after I've returned the library's copy that I just read. It's a keeper. And if Emma Forrest is reading this--please give us another Sadie Steinberg story!
Laizel
I absolutely loved this book. The unusual main character, Sadie was oddly very easy to connect with. I love how she expressed herself through her lipstick. It is a book about finding yourself, finding yourself through love, and finding yourself in some pretty akward, yet hillarious situations. It's creative, poetic, and funny. It made me laugh out loud but also really feel for the main characters. It also made me want to go buy lots of lipstick!