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eBook The Letters of Robert Lowell download
Fiction
Author: Saskia Hamilton,Robert Lowell
ISBN: 0374185468
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Pages 888 pages
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1 edition (June 9, 2005)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 669
ePUB size: 1195 kb
FB2 size: 1874 kb
DJVU size: 1263 kb
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eBook The Letters of Robert Lowell download

by Saskia Hamilton,Robert Lowell


Robert Lowell and Caroline Blackwood, June 1971. Photograph: Evening Standard/Getty Images

Robert Lowell and Caroline Blackwood, June 1971. Photograph: Evening Standard/Getty Images. Hardwick’s distress did not blunt her critical acuity: her heart was broken, she told the poet Elizabeth Bishop, by the indiscretions of The Dolphin, and also by the fatuities and bad line. n the page that Lowell attributed to her. Responding, he rebuffed the offer of continued loyalty that Hardwick had made in good faith, not wife-manoeuvre.

This collection of Robert Lowell letters is an excellent supplement to Lowell's Collected Poems. The letters are divided into 8 sections, with each section covering a period of 5-7 years, and grouped according to major events or publications in Lowell's life. The letters are fascinating and wonderfully written. With the annotation, they're also easy to follow, and you really get a sense of what it must have been like to be one of the poets in Lowell's inner circle

Robert Traill Spence Lowell IV (/ˈloʊəl/; March 1, 1917 – September 12, 1977) was an American poet. He was born into a Boston Brahmin family that could trace its origins back to the Mayflower

Robert Traill Spence Lowell IV (/ˈloʊəl/; March 1, 1917 – September 12, 1977) was an American poet. He was born into a Boston Brahmin family that could trace its origins back to the Mayflower. His family, past and present, were important subjects in his poetry. Growing up in Boston also informed his poems, which were frequently set in Boston and the New England region. The literary scholar Paula Hayes believes that Lowell mythologized New England, particularly in his early work.

This Letters of Robert Lowell has rekindled an old argument. When Ian Hamilton published his Life of Lowell in 1982, five years after the poet's death, various friends and family members thought the book placed too much emphasis on Lowell's manic breakdowns and under-valued what ran straight and true in his career. Other people - including Elizabeth Hardwick and most readers who had no first-hand knowledge of Lowell - felt Hamilton had got the balance about right

Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux. One of the most influential poets of the twentieth century, Robert Lowell was also a prolific letter writer who corresponded with many of the remarkable writers and thinkers of his day, including Elizabeth Bishop, Ezra Pound, Hannah Arendt, William Carlos Williams, T. S. Eliot, Robert Frost, and Edmund Wilson.

Ian Hamilton's biography of Lowell, still the most influential document on the poet, was published five years after Lowell's death to howls of protest from the poet's intimates

This collection of Robert Lowell letters is an excellent supplement to Lowell's Collected Poems. With the annotation, they're also easy to follow, and you really get a sense of what it must have been like to be one of the poets in Lowell's inner circle

I am 19, a freshman at Harvard, and some relation, I don't know what, to Amy Lowell. All my life I have been eccentric according to normal standards.

A-12 Wigglesworth Hall Harvard College Cambridge, Mass. I am 19, a freshman at Harvard, and some relation, I don't know what, to Amy Lowell. None of this led anywhere, I was more interested in collecting large numbers than in developing them. I caught over thirty turtles and put them in a well where they died of insufficient feeding.

Especially recommended for fans of Robert Lowell. Robert Lowell, born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, IV, was an American poet whose works, confessional in nature, engaged with the questions of history. Robert Lowell, born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, IV, was an American poet whose works, confessional in nature, engaged with the questions of history and probed the dark recesses of the self. He is generally considered to be among the greatest American poets of the twentieth century.

Over the course of his life, Robert Lowell impressed those who knew him by his "refusal to be boring on paper" (Christopher Benfey). One of the most influential poets of the twentieth century, Lowell was also a prolific letter writer who corresponded with many of the remarkable writers and thinkers of his day, including Elizabeth Bishop, Edmund Wilson, Robert Kennedy, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, T. S. Eliot, and Robert Frost.

These letters document the evolution of Lowell's work and illuminate another side of the intimate life that was the subject of so many of his poems: his deep friendships with other writers; the manic-depressive illness he struggled to endure and understand; his marriages to three prose writers; and his engagement with politics and the antiwar movement of the 1960s.

The Letters of Robert Lowell shows us, in many cases for the first time, the private thoughts and passions of a figure unrivaled for his influence on American letters.

Gaiauaco
Of course Lowell's letters are infinitely fascinating if you're a poet or a student of literature. But the one great detail in this edition is the list of all the places Robert Lowell ever lived, as an appendix. . .I have the mixed blessing of living in Iowa, but was thrilled to visit the three places he lived when he taught at the University of Iowa. . .So odd to picture him there, and there, and there. . .
I ℓ٥ﻻ ﻉ√٥υ
This collection of Robert Lowell letters is an excellent supplement to Lowell's Collected Poems. Like the Collected Poems, this book is heavily annotated (which is a very good thing) and well-edited. The letters are divided into 8 sections, with each section covering a period of 5-7 years, and grouped according to major events or publications in Lowell's life.

The letters are fascinating and wonderfully written. With the annotation, they're also easy to follow, and you really get a sense of what it must have been like to be one of the poets in Lowell's inner circle. You also get an up-close and personal sense of Lowell as a human being: his ambitions, frustrations, and judgments are all very clearly spelled out.

I would highly recommend this book to any serious fan of Lowell's poetry. It would also be an excellent resource for anyone interested in the American poetry scene in the 1950's and 60's.
Puchock
A superb read. Complements what's out there with focusing on the mental illness issue. Very nicely written.
Contancia
A
Cerekelv
Excellent
Mr_TrOlOlO
Robert Lowell was a great poet to be sure. These letters shine a bit of light on his non-public side. He is rude to his parents, snide in fact. In the 1st 2 sections he asks for money from them again and again, though he treats them as imbeciles and abuses them through his letters and in person. He boasts about his brilliance and believes that the path he is on will lead to fame, as it does. But at what price?

It is hard to like R. Lowell as a person. I had moments when I wanted to yell at him (crazy, huh?). I believe that we should sometimes settle for art rather than the artist.
Nten
The book arrived in a timely fashion. I liked it because it did have a plastic cover over the dust jacket. That was impressive. The binding of the book was just a little bit loose -- but nothing to detract from reading the book. I would give it 4.5 stars.
Saskia Hamilton, a New York based poet, proves her mettle as an editor with this fat collection of Robert Lowell's letters.

He wrote great letters, and this surprised me a bit, but every one of them shows an insane desire to please, to flatter, to make the recipient feel good about himself or herself; he's marvelously attentive to nuance and knows exactly how to push the right buttons of his correspondents, telling them just what they want to hear. And he's sincere, which is a plus. Over and over again I was impressed by the facility with which he was blessed, or maybe he worked it up over time, because the earliest letters aren't that great, it's not until he gets into the 1940s that the familiar Lowell manner takes over.

This volume explains so much! Mostly how it was that, with all the truly awful things Lowell did, people still loved him. If it wasn't red-baiting the director of Yaddo and forcing the board to impeach her in 1947, it was publishing all those poems about Elizabeth and Harriet against their wishes, or it was wanting to marry Jackie Kennedy or whatever. Apparently all these were episodes of a manic nature in his bipolar disorder, including the car wreck that permanently disfigured wife #1 Jean Stafford. Well, of course none of them were really his fault but still. And now this book of letters unveils his real private voicem, gently coaxing reassuring, making sense of the world, interpolating, and penetrating the consciousness of whoever he was writing to at the time. The older and the famous got one style of letter; his peers got another.

Hamilton's notes are sparse, but seem sensible. However printing over 700 of these letters is out of control. Like the Bidart-edited POEMS, the book physically becomes too big to handle, it takes two strong men just to lift it off the shelf. Why so many? Plus, one gets the feeling that this is just the tip of the iceberg as far as the letters go, and that in a year's time we may have the first of many annual sequels, "More Letters by Robert Lowell." Never underestimate how many times a manic genius (with, as he boasts, unearned income and lots of free time) will reach out to others to make himself heard and understood. The word is the life.