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Fiction
Author: Justin E. Griffin
ISBN: 0786409991
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Pages 157 pages
Publisher McFarland & Company; 1st edition (December 31, 2001)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 830
ePUB size: 1690 kb
FB2 size: 1344 kb
DJVU size: 1745 kb
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eBook Holy Grail. The Legend, the History, the Evidence download

by Justin E. Griffin


The legend of the holy grail, like much dubious history of its vintage, encompasses a veritable labyrinth of. .Finally, something fresh about the Holy Grail legend. It is obvious this book was written by someone who has made the study of Grail legends his life's mission

The legend of the holy grail, like much dubious history of its vintage, encompasses a veritable labyrinth of divergent, often directly contradictory stories. It is not one legend but many, from King Arthur to the Knights Templar to the mysterious village of Rennes-le-Chateau and the Merovingian bloodline. It is obvious this book was written by someone who has made the study of Grail legends his life's mission. But he does not approach it with a theory already in mind, trying to find (or fit) the evidence to that theory.

The existence of the Holy Grail has long been debated, and many of these debates focus on the intellectualized .

The existence of the Holy Grail has long been debated, and many of these debates focus on the intellectualized or psychological aspects of it. This work explores the events that gave rise to the legend of the Holy Grail and pays special attention to the texts that form the body of the legend, as well as historical facts about the life of Christ, the Crusades, and the fall The existence of the Holy Grail has long been debated, and many of these debates focus on the intellectualized. or psychological aspects of it.

Thankfully, Griffin never goes there. When it started out I had thought that his thesis was going to be based around the culture of the Grail. The back cover says that he introduces a new theory about multiple grails, so I thought that meant that the legend of the Holy Grail was based on several old textual legends from around the world. I really liked that idea. He spent several interesting pages showing how older sources evolved into the King Arthur legends.

Justin E. Griffin is the author of three books and maintains ww. istoricalgrail. He lives in Knoxville, Tennessee, where he works in the Office of Information Technology at the University of Tennessee. Política de opiniones. This work explores the events that gave rise to the legend of the Holy Grail and pays. This work explores the events that gave rise to the legend of the Holy Grail and pays special attention to the texts that form the body of the legend, as well as historical facts about the life of Christ, the Crusades, and the fall from grace of the Knights Templar. He lives in Knoxville, Tennessee, where he works in the Office of Information Technology at the University of Tennessee

Justin E. Country of Publication.

While legends of the quest for the Holy Grail continue to grip the popular imagination, the other relics, once closely .

While legends of the quest for the Holy Grail continue to grip the popular imagination, the other relics, once closely associated with the Grail legends, receive little mention. Still, the overlooked Grail Hallows, as they are called, have a rich symbolic history, winding through the ages-and leading in some surprising directions.

This work explores the events that gave rise to the legend of the Holy Grail and pays special attention to the texts that form the body of the legend, as well as historical facts about the life of Christ, the Crusades, and the fall from grace of the Knights Templar.

By: Justin E. Griffin. Publisher: McFarland. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to The Grail Procession: The Legend, the Artifacts, and the Possible Sources of the Story. Print ISBN: 9780786419395, 0786419393. While legends of the quest for the Holy Grail continue to grip the popular imagination, the other relics, once closely associated with the Grail legends, receive little mention. eTextbook Return Policy.

The Grail legend is a literary invention of the 12th century with no historical basis, Carlos de Ayala, a medieval . Even if there is a Holy Grail, proving that it indeed was the goblet used by Jesus would be nearly impossible.

The Grail legend is a literary invention of the 12th century with no historical basis, Carlos de Ayala, a medieval historian at a Madrid university, told the AFP news agency. One thing that’s all but certain, however, is that in spite of the latest announcement, history’s greatest treasure hunt will continue.

The Holy Grail was said to be the vessel from which Christ drank at the Last Supper, which later held some of the blood of the crucified Christ and which was brought to England by Joseph of Arimathea. Fact or fiction? The grail was later plunged into the realms of Arthurian and medieval legend and myth and remains a mystery today. This book traces the events that led to the rise of the legend associated with the grail, based on both textual material and historical facts relating to Christ, Holy Wars, relics, the Knights Templar and so on. Griffin claims that 'The Grail is not only a true, physical object, but the truth behind the legend has proven to be even stranger than the fiction written about it... the myth of the Grail as simply a spiritual or psychological abstraction has been shattered'.
Perongafa
Finally, something fresh about the Holy Grail legend. It is obvious this book was written by someone who has made the study of Grail legends his life's mission. But he does not approach it with a theory already in mind, trying to find (or fit) the evidence to that theory. Having a preconceived notion filters our view. Griffin steps back, and starts from scratch - instead of any preconceived notion leading him, he decides to let the facts, the evidences, lead him. Read the book to the end, let Griffin give you another way of looking at the Grail legends. The search for the truth requires humility, requires that one question one's assumptions, and as the New Testament says, to test all things and keep that which is good.
Dalallador
I confess I'm obsessed with the Grail, the Knights Templar, Mary Magdalene, the Tarot. Blame that doggone DaVinci Code. This quest-no pun intended-led me to Griffin's book.
The good news is it's short and it does have some interesting historical asides (Jesus' blood would have been preserved by Joseph of Armimathea in the Grail because it was the Jewish burial tradition to bury spilt blood with the deceased.) The bad news is the book badly needs an editor. Information is repeated over and over, sometimes within paragraphs of each other. Griffin, while clearly passionate about his subject, is also clearly not a career writer-the cover says he's a network specialist. He's capable but his prose lacks a certain polish and elegance. He also has a slight Christian bias, occasionally not separating historical fact from mythology. For example, Griffin states that Joseph of Arimathea established the first Christian church at Glastonbury and carried with him 2 cruets of Christ's blood. I believe Joseph's founding of Glastonbury and in fact his presence in the British Isles is legend-supported by incidental historical details but nonetheless not fact. However Griffin presents it this way and uses this legend as a jumping off point for a whole line of reasoning. That and few other instances made me question the information and conclusions provided.
This book is a good supplement or jumping off point but should not be considered the alpha and omega of your own quest for the Grail legend. Good luck, fellows knights!
Nawenadet
I've never studied much about the Holy Grail, though the occult is a long-standing interest of mine. I thought that this book might be a good place to start an exploration. It looked short and sweet, and the editorial review here was favorable. Boy, was I wrong! The facts that Griffin cites don't substantiate his conclusions, and he doesn't even attribute them. The book (or at least the first few chapters of it, I stopped reading midway in disgust) is full of lofty references to the breadth of research required for a study of the Grail. If Griffin did research, I didn't find any evidence of that. (Footnotes, man! Footnotes are your friends!) And also, even though my understanding of the history and legend surrounding the Grail is extremely limited, he didn't tell me anything that I didn't already know. Very disappointing.
Kecq
I suppose the best one can say about Griffin's The Holy Grail: The Legend, the History, the Evidence is that at least it provides an interested reader with a basic Grail vocabulary. And it's short. That's the good news. The bad news is that Griffin stretches remote possibility/hearsay-types of anecdotes and tries to represent them as facts. Lots of passive voice ("it has been determined that..." or "it is thought that..."), absolutely no direct source citation for his "facts." The bibliography at the back is no substitute for solid in-text source citation to substantiate every assertion! My conclusion: When you try to concretize a metaphor, all you end up with is nebulous, dubious, unsubstantiated speculation disguised as historical inquiry (for example, check out Griffin's "analysis" of Longinus's spear, or the "findings" of St. Helena in Jesus's tomb). Skip this book.
artman
This examines the Holy Grail myth and its connections to the Templars.