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Fiction
Author: Mimi Reisel Gladstein,Chris Matthew Sciabarra
ISBN: 0271018305
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Pages 480 pages
Publisher Pennsylvania State University Press; 1st edition (February 4, 1999)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 307
ePUB size: 1221 kb
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eBook Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand (Re-Reading the Canon) download

by Mimi Reisel Gladstein,Chris Matthew Sciabarra


Chris Matthew Sciabarra is Visiting Scholar in the Department of Politics at NYU and is the author of Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical (1995) and Marx, Hayek, and Utopia (1995).

ISBN-13: 978-0271018317. Chris Matthew Sciabarra is Visiting Scholar in the Department of Politics at NYU and is the author of Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical (1995) and Marx, Hayek, and Utopia (1995). Series: Re-Reading the Canon.

Chris Matthew Sciabarra (born February 17, 1960) is an American . Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand. Re-reading the Canon.

Chris Matthew Sciabarra (born February 17, 1960) is an American political theorist based in Brooklyn, New York. He is the author of three scholarly books-Marx, Hayek, and Utopia; Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical; and Total Freedom: Toward a Dialectical Libertarianism-as well as several shorter works. His work has focused on topics including Objectivism, libertarianism (particularly the work of Friedrich Hayek and Murray Rothbard), and dialectics.

This landmark anthology is the first to engage critically the writings of Ayn Rand from feminist perspectives

This landmark anthology is the first to engage critically the writings of Ayn Rand from feminist perspectives. The interdisciplinary feminist strategies of re-reading Rand range from the lightness of camp to the darkness of de Sade, from postandrogyny to poststructuralism.

Start by marking Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand (Re-Reading the .

Start by marking Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand (Re-Reading the Canon) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The interdisciplinary feminist strategies of re-reading Rand range from the lightness of camp to the darkness of de Sade, from postandrogeny to poststructuralism. Having recently read my first Rand book, The Fountainhead, I was struck by the author's host of admirable qualities: her intelligence, conviction and accomplishments despite a cultural climate not friendly to women or atheists. I was also fascinated with her high exultation of masculine virtues and thinly veiled disgust for all things feminine.

a b c Gladstein, Mimi Reisel & Sciabarra, Chris Matthew, eds. (1999). University Park, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 398. ISBN 0-271-01831-3. "11th Annual International Latino Book Awards". The Latino Book & Family Festival. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016.

Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand. Atlas Shrugged: Manifesto of the Mind. Twayne's Masterwork Studies. New York: Twayne Publishers. Breakthroughs in Ayn Rand Literary Criticism" in Thomas, William, ed (2005). The Literary Art of Ayn Rand.

Items related to Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand (Re-Reading th. .Chris Matthew Sciabarra is Visiting Scholar in the Department of Politics a.Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand (Re-Reading the Canon). ISBN 13: 9780271018317. Mimi Reisel Gladstein is Associate Dean of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas, El Paso.

Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand is part of the Penn State Press series, Re-Reading the Canon.

Mimi Reisel Gladstein is Associate Dean of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas, El Paso. Библиографические данные. Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand Re-reading the Canon.

This landmark anthology is the first to engage critically the writings of Ayn Rand from feminist perspectives. The interdisciplinary feminist strategies of re-reading Rand range from the lightness of camp to the darkness of de Sade, from postandrogyny to poststructuralism. A highly charged dialogue on Rand's legacy provides the forum for a reexamination of feminism and its relationship to egoism, individualism, and capitalism. Rand's place in contemporary feminism is assessed through comparisons with other twentieth-century feminists, such as de Beauvoir, Wolf, Paglia, Eisler, and Gilligan. What results is as provocative in its implications for Rand's system as it is for feminism.

Zaryagan
Some browsers might be interested in an open letter that Nathaniel Branden <[email protected]> wrote to Chris Sciabarra concerning this book:
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Dear Everyone, Now that it's in the bookstores (or available through amazon.com), I urge you to buy and read FEMINIST INTERPRETATIONS OF AYN RAND. The collection is fantastically interesting--and important. (Forget the fact that I am one of the contributors; this is not self-serving.) Naturally, one likes some essays more than others, and some of the pieces are anything but friendly to Rand, and that's all right too, because what matters is that the average intellectual level of the pieces is very high--and the editors are to be saluted for assembling this marvelous collection and for taking another step in closing the gap between AR and the academy. I have no words to convey the rush I experienced while reading this book. Those poor souls at ARI do not understand that this book, criticisms of Rand and all, will do more to advance the cause of Rand's work than all their true-believer praise and idiotic adulation. Have fun. I did. And (if anyone cares) you can quote me. Nathaniel
Dondallon
This was a lot of fun, and it somewhat rekindled my old flame for Atlas Shrugged even as it confirmed my basic dislike for the Fountainhead. I never did read We the Living.

As with any multi-author collection, this volume has good and bad elements. Barbara Branden's contribution humanizes Ayn Rand with a really powerful grace. It's good that the book begins with this.

Another favorite was Karen Michalson's Who is Dagny Taggart?, which makes a persuasive case for Dagny as a feminist hero. Michalson draws attention to Rand's use of clever inversion in three superficially sexist or misogynistic scenes (Francisco slapping Dagny, Dagny acquiring and donning the Rearden Metal bracelet, and Dagny performing domestic work for John Galt) that, in context and with the particular construals of the characters, reveal enlightened feminist ideas. In each case, the sexist trope (abuse by a man, wearing jewelry from a man, and domestic work for a man) involve Dagny acting with self-respect according to her own rationally chosen values.

I also appreciated Sharon Presley's essay on Rand and individualist feminism. One concern I often have with libertarian feminists is that they often only discuss feminists from a century or more ago, leaving one puzzled as to whether they find anything of value in modern feminist thought. But Presley engages thoughtfully with Carol Gilligan and her ethics of care, finding (correctly, in my view) that there is a synthesis possible with care ethics and individualist values, and that a healthy individualism is pro-social.

This is a fun book to read for anyone interested in feminism who has read a little bit of Rand, whether you love or hate her or, like me, are decidedly ambivalent.
blac wolf
Mimi Reisel Gladstein is also the author of books such as The New Ayn Rand Companion, Revised and Expanded Edition,Atlas Shrugged: Manifesto of the Mind, and Ayn Rand (Major Conservative & Libertarian Thinkers); Chris Matthew Sciabarra is also the author of books such as Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical,Ayn Rand, Homosexuality, and Human Liberation, and Ayn Rand : Her Life and Thought.

They wrote in their Introduction to this 1999 book, "Feminism is not a monolith. It is composed of a variety of approaches in both method and content. This volume reflects that proposition... several individuals who remain within the Randian circle ... were not willing to contribute to any volume whose premise is feminism... As co-editors of this volume, we hope to have contributed to a critical rereading of Rand's works as 'works of philosophy in their own right.' That this discussion of an influential woman thinker of the Western canon takes place in the context of feminism is both appropriate and long overdue." The book contains essays by writers such as Barbara Branden, Susan Brownmiller, Camille Paglia, Wendy McElroy, Nathaniel Branden, Joan Kennedy Taylor, etc.

Barbara Branden's essay begins by noting that, as feminists began making increasing demands for laws, etc., "Ayn Rand turned ever more violently against feminism. She seemed unaware of the growing pro-individualist concept of feminism---of which her own books were a significant source." (Pg. 25-26) Susan Brownmiller calls Rand "a traitor to her own sex" (largely because of the infamous rape scene in The Fountainhead; pg. 65). Nevertheless, Wendy McElroy asks, "what heterosexual woman hasn't fantasized about being swept into the strong impetuous arms of Rhett Butler and conveyed up a curving staircase to the satin sheets of ravishment?" (Pg. 169)

An essayist asks, "So why are there so few women in Galt's Gulch, and why didn't Rand create more strong women in 'Atlas Shrugged'?" (Pg. 215) Another notes that Rand was known "proudly to proclaim" that she was not a feminist, but suggests that her gender assumptions, "arising from emotional needs that she did not acknowledge, are in conflict with her rational view of women as individuals and the equals of men." (Pg. 293) Still another suggests that Rand's project "has been prohibited from reaching its full potential because of flaws and inconsistencies in her notions of gender." (Pg. 351)

These essays will be of great value to students of Rand and her philosophy of Objectivism.