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eBook A Republic in Time: Temporality and Social Imagination in Nineteenth-Century America download
Fiction
Author: Thomas M. Allen
ISBN: 0807831794
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Pages 296 pages
Publisher The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (February 25, 2008)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 719
ePUB size: 1281 kb
FB2 size: 1656 kb
DJVU size: 1992 kb
Other formats: lrf lit mobi mbr

eBook A Republic in Time: Temporality and Social Imagination in Nineteenth-Century America download

by Thomas M. Allen


In this compelling work, Thomas M. Allen argues . Allen's primary material is incredibly wide-ranging, and each chapter of A Republic in Time takes on a new area of study, from the manufacturing of clocks in America to America's reception of new geological theories.

In this compelling work, Thomas M. Allen argues that spatial transformation was less important in the imagining of America by its people than the perception of time. This shift in thinking opens the reader to envision more complex, and at times competing, ideas of what nationhood meant to Americans during this period. Indiana Magazine of History.

In this innovative study, Thomas Allen posits time, not space, as the most significant territory of the young nation. He argues that beginning in the nineteenth century, the actual geography of the nation became less important, as Americans imagined the future as their true national territory. Allen explores how transformations in the perception of time shaped American conceptions of democratic society and modern nationhood. If Americans set out to colonize time in the nineteenth century, the emergence of mechanical timekeeping as a major cultural force lent new contours to the imagined empire.

Home Browse Books Book details, A Republic in Time: Temporality and Social. A Republic in Time: Temporality and Social Imagination in Nineteenth-Century America.

Maligned Presidents: The Late 19th Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996. Volume 54 - Teresa Meade. June 2010 · Winterthur Portfolio.

A Republic in Time: Temporality and Social Imagination in NineteenthCentury America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008. 275 p. 33 illustrations, index. Published: 1 June 2010. by University of Chicago Press. in Winterthur Portfolio. Winterthur Portfolio, Volume 44, pp 256-257; doi:10.

University of North Carolina Press. 978-0-8078-3179-3 0-8078-3179-4 978-0-8078-5865-3.

A Republic in Time: Temporality and Social Imagination in NineteenthCentury America.

Allen, Thomas M. Book summary views reflect the number of visits to the book and chapter landing pages.

Thomas Allen, Associate Professor of English, University of Ottawa, Canada and author of A Republic in Time: Temporality and Social Imagination in Nineteenth-Century America). Bryony Randall, Lecturer in English Literature, University of Glasgow, UK). Show all. Table of contents (6 chapters).

The development of the American nation has typically been interpreted in terms of its expansion through space, specifically its growth westward. In this innovative study, Thomas Allen posits time, not space, as the most significant territory of the young nation. He argues that beginning in the nineteenth century, the actual geography of the nation became less important, as Americans imagined the future as their true national territory.Allen explores how transformations in the perception of time shaped American conceptions of democratic society and modern nationhood. He focuses on three ways of imagining time: the romantic historical time that prevailed at the outset of the nineteenth century, the geological "deep time" that arose as widely read scientific works displaced biblical chronology with a new scale of millions of years of natural history, and the technology-driven "clock time" that became central to American culture by century's end. Allen analyzes cultural artifacts ranging from clocks and scientific treatises to paintings and literary narratives to show how Americans made use of these diverse ideas about time to create competing visions of American nationhood.