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eBook Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence (British Library Studies in Medieval Culture) download
Fiction
Author: Lesley Smith,Jane Taylor
ISBN: 0802042163
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Pages 252 pages
Publisher University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 74th Revised edition edition (April 19, 1997)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 536
ePUB size: 1210 kb
FB2 size: 1881 kb
DJVU size: 1115 kb
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eBook Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence (British Library Studies in Medieval Culture) download

by Lesley Smith,Jane Taylor


Women And The Book book.

Women And The Book book. Start by marking Women And The Book: Assessing The Visual Evidence as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Lesley M. Smith.

Description this book This collection of commissioned essays re-evaluates the role of medieval women as readers, authors, and subjects of books, and the depiction of the relationships between women and books in medieval art. The fourteen essays cover such diverse topics as the development of a female audience for books, examinations of illuminations of and for women in books of hours, and how female authors viewed themselves, as well as the manufacture and collection of books and images by women.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual. A collection of writings by 14 scholars which consider the evidence of women's involvement in medieval literary culture through pictorial representations in manuscripts of the period. Publisher: London: British Library, 1997. Publication Date: 1997. The contributors also assess the problematic nature of illustrations as historical evidence for our understanding of the lives of medieval women and their involvement with books, whether as comissioners, owners, writers, scribes and illuminators, or as subjects of illustrations.

The British Library Studies in Medieval Culture. Kathryn A. Smith, The Taymouth Hours: Stories and the Construction of Self in Late Medieval England. London: British Library; Toronto and Buffalo, . University of Toronto Press, 2003. Pp. Xix, 364 Plus 8 Color Plates; 145 Black-and-White Figures, 2 Genealogical Tables, and 5 Maps. London and Toronto: British Library and University of Toronto Press, 2012. Xxii, 369 Plus DVD; 182 Black-and-White Figures and 8 Color Figures.

A. R. Stanton, From Eve to Bathsheba and Beyond: Motherhood in the Queen Mary Psalter, in Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence, ed.

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE September 12 Introduction to the Course and Visit to the Annenberg Rare Book and Manuscript Library September 19 Medieval Book Production and the Technology of Manuscript Culture (Meet at the Annenberg Rare Book and Manuscript Library) Readings: W. Noel and A. Quandt, From Calf to Codex, Leaves of Gold, pp. 14-20 . Alexander, Chapter 1: The Medieval. A. J. H. M. Taylor and L. Smith (London: British Library, 1997), pp. 172-189.

Women and the book: assessing the visual evidence. The British Library studies in medieval culture. Lesley Janette Smith. Toronto: U of Toronto P. 172–89. ISBN 978-0-8020-8069-1. Agriculture in the Middle Ages: technology, practice, and representation. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P. ISBN 978-0-8122-3282-0. New York City: Random House.

Joan M. Ferrante; Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence Jane H. Taylor, Lesley Smith. Joshua Goldstein has authored an exhaustive and insightful book on the major ways in which gender and war influence each other.

Article in Signs Journal of Women in Culture and Society 25(2) · January 2000 with 19 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Jane Taylor, Lesley Smith.

For medieval books written by and intended for women, see Jane . Taylor and Lesley Smith, Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence, British Library Studies in Medieval Culture (London: British Library; Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996); for book ownership by women, seeGoogle Scholar. For aristocratic women’s family letters, see John M. Klassen, trans.

This collection of commissioned essays re-evaluates the role of medieval women as readers, authors, and subjects of books, and the depiction of the relationships between women and books in medieval art. The fourteen essays cover such diverse topics as the development of a female audience for books, examinations of illuminations of and for women in books of hours, and how female authors viewed themselves, as well as the manufacture and collection of books and images by women.

Dealing specifically with the relationships between women and images, the volume will be of interest to art historians, feminist scholars, and historians alike.