» » Harold Nicolson
eBook Harold Nicolson download
Fiction
Author: Norman Rose
ISBN: 0712668454
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Pages 400 pages
Publisher Random House UK (February 1, 2006)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 222
ePUB size: 1738 kb
FB2 size: 1440 kb
DJVU size: 1782 kb
Other formats: lrf azw rtf lit

eBook Harold Nicolson download

by Norman Rose


Few men could boast such gifts as Nicolson possessed, yet he ended his life plagued by self-doubt

Harold Nicolson, born in the late Victorian age, scion of a privileged family, was a man of extraordinary talents. As a diplomat a glittering career beckoned - an Embassy certainly, perhaps even head of the Foreign Office.

Sir Harold George Nicolson, KCVO CMG (21 November 1886 – 1 May 1968), was a British diplomat, author, diarist and politician. He was the husband of writer Vita Sackville-West

Sir Harold George Nicolson, KCVO CMG (21 November 1886 – 1 May 1968), was a British diplomat, author, diarist and politician. He was the husband of writer Vita Sackville-West. Nicolson was born in Tehran, Persia, the youngest son of diplomat Arthur Nicolson, 1st Baron Carnock. He spent his boyhood in various places throughout Europe and the Near East, following his father's frequent postings, including St. Petersburg, Constantinople, Madrid, Sofia and Tangier

Harold Nicolson book. Relying on a wealth of archival material, Norman Rose brilliantly disentangles fact from fiction, setting Nicolson's story of perceived failure against the wider perspective of his times.

Harold Nicolson book. Harold Nicolson was a man of extraordinary gifts  .

This item:The Harold Nicolson Diaries 1907-1964 by Nigel Nicolson . Rich life experience. Harold Nicolson can best be appreciated by reading these diaries.

Rich life experience.

Harold Nicolson often wondered why he had not been more successful. He had shown promise as a diplomat until his wife, Vita Sackville-West, insisted he gave it up. But after that he drifted, making little impact as an author and none as a politician. Was it, he pondered, because he lacked some vital spark? To readers of Norman Rose’s biography, the question of what was wrong with Harold will seem less of a mystery. He was a rabid snob and a squirming snake-pit of prejudice, without even the intelligence to realise that other people were as human as himself. Rose blames his upbringing.

Harold Nicolson was a man of extraordinary gifts. A renowned politician, historian, biographer, diarist, novelist, lecturer, journalist, broadcaster and gardener, his position in society and politics allowed him an insight into the most dramatic events of British, indeed world, history. Nicolson's personal life was no less dramatic. Married to Vita Sackville-West, one of the most famous writers of her day, their marriage survived, even prospered, despite their both being practising homosexuals.

Published by Pimlico. Harold Nicolson was a man of extraordinary gifts

Published by Pimlico. Nicolson’s personal life was no less dramatic.

Harold Nicolson, the third son of Arthur Nicolson, first Baron Carnock, and his wife, Mary Katharine . Harold Nicholson became concerned about Vita's relationship with Rosamund Grosvenor. He was puzzled by Rosamund's subservient attitude to Vita.

Harold Nicolson, the third son of Arthur Nicolson, first Baron Carnock, and his wife, Mary Katharine Rowan was born in Teheran on 21st November, 1886. His father was a diplomat and his childhood was spent in Turkey, Spain, Morocco and Russia. In 1895, he was sent away to attend The Grange, a preparatory school near Folkestone. He mentioned this in a letter to Vita, who replied: "It is a pity and rather tiresome.

As Norman Rose remarks, this 18-year-old . By that time Nicolson had long since made what Rose calls the move from diplomacy to Grub Street

As Norman Rose remarks, this 18-year-old already displayed a lifelong prejudice, a conviction that ‘mankind was divided into two categories: a racial, social and intellectual aristocracy, to which, naturally, he belonged; and the rest, philistines in taste, who, by definition, were excluded from his gilded circles’. Rose’s book makes the most of Nicolson’s acquaintance with many great men between the wars: the feeble Neville Chamberlain; the hopeless Eden; the charming, charismatic Churchill. By that time Nicolson had long since made what Rose calls the move from diplomacy to Grub Street. His journalism was successful, though he hated himself for doing it.

Norman Rose, Harold Nicolson (Jonathan Cape, 2005), ISBN 0-224-06218-2. Bombay: Oxford University Press, 1966, p. 2. This is from the introduction to the book, in which its author tells of . s role in getting it published in 1940. There is no reference to . Derek Drinkwater, Sir Harold Nicolson & International Relations, ( Oxford University Press, 2005), ISBN 0-19-927385-5. Laurence Bristow-Smith, Harold Nicolson: Half-an-Eye on History. s work in this capacity in his published Diaries, presumably due to the Official Secrets Act. ^ Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization, Nicholson Baker, 2008.

Born in the late Victorian age, Harold Nicolson was a man of extraordinary talents—diplomat, politician, historian, biographer, diarist, novelist, literary critic, essayist, journalist, and gardener. His position in society and politics gave him insight into the most dramatic events of world history. Married to Vita Sackville-West, one of the most famous writers of her day, their marriage prospered despite their sexual orientations, for both were practicing homosexuals. Unashamedly elitist, bound together by their literary, social, and intellectual pursuits, moving in the refined circles of the Bloomsbury Group and other coteries, they viewed life from the rarified peaks of aristocratic haughtiness. Here, Norman Rose brilliantly sets Nicolson’s story against the wider perspective of his times.
Acrobat
Harold Nicolson has the distinction of being one of the few persons who combined a polticial and a literary career.

Rose does a good job of describing and judging Nicolson's political doings. I haven't read the longer bio by Lee-Milnes, but I have a feeling that more about Nicolson's politics would be too much for readers who aren't specialists in diplomatic history.

He's less clear about the distinction of Nicolson's literary productions. SOME PEOPLE, for example, was a book that Vladmir Nabokov praised, saying he was "haunted by its tone", but Rose doesn't mention Nabokov in this regard. Also, his cursory statements about Nicolson's biographies of Sainte-Beuve and Benjamin Constant, to pick two examples, don't suggest why anyone would want to read these books today, even though they're both excellent (the SAINTE-BEUVE particularly if you don't read French).

I think he explains the odd marriage of Harold and Vita adequately, but Nigel, Nicolson's son, does a better job in his PORTRAIT OF A MARRIAGE, in spite of his inevitable bias.

I recommend this book to anyone interested in British history and literature of the first-half of the century, though if you want to go further, you should read the three volumes of Nicolson's diaries and letters, edited by his son Nigel.
Gardagar
It is a nice biography of a man who became by dint of his brilliance as a writer became a reference of diplomacy as a profession. He also was in the middle of many interesting issues in his time. Recommended
Ienekan
When I got to then end of this biography, I thought to myself `What a great life!'. Harold was the son of Sir Arthur Nicolson who ended his own distinguished career in the diplomatic service as the UK's Permanent Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs and entered the peerage on his retirement. Harold would never stick to one career and never match his father. He left Baliol, Oxford University with a 3rd Class degree; this outcome was reflected in Harold's professional life. He had entry to every career he ever wanted but would never wholly commit himself or succeed to the highest level as his father did. But what careers he had. He was a gifted diplomatist and played an important supportive role at the Conference at Versailles producing one superb memorandum after another on the carve up of Europe after WW1. Many of his recommendations were accepted and it was only the streak of arrogance that ran through him that, ultimately, made it difficult for him to get beyond the grade of Counsellor.

He resigned from diplomacy to become a journalist, MP, broadcaster and amazingly prolific author (including his classic book `Diplomacy' which, I know, is still read by young keen diplomatists), and, of course, creator with his wife Vita Sackville-West, of Sissinghurt's gardens (incidentally Sissinghurst was owned 100% by Vita). His political career was rather lacklustre; he joined Oswald Mosley's ill fated New Party basically because he could and it would give him the best chance of entering Parliament. He did become an MP but he wasn't tough enough or competitive or even interested enough for a career in politics. His biography gives us an excellent inside view of Versailles; Harold remembered the conference as chaotic and disappointing but readers are reminded that his wife was conducting her most dangerous affair at this time* and Harold was dealing with that too. It also gives great insights into the British political scene leading up to WW2 and though to the 1950s.

Harold's downside is his strong sense of elitism and his vociferous, even for the times, racism. I found him obnoxious at times and degraded by the revelations. He was capable of strong dislikes and radical leftist Phillip Toynbee, a close friend of his son Ben, appears to have been his bête noire. But primarily, amongst his friends and peers, Harold was a gentle, compassionate, well liked man who loved his life. I like the way he took advantage of the silver spoon life gave him and lived his life to the full. I am amazed by his productivity. At the end of his life he had no regrets about his career and specifically said he was glad he had left his diplomatic life behind. His only regret was that his beloved wife, Vita, was no longer with him; her death broke his own will to live.

I first got to know about Harold Nicolson through his son Nigel's `Portrait of a Marriage' which brought into the public domain the open nature of his parents' marriage and the homosexuality of both. One of the main benefits of the openness and the separateness of their lives (Harold was in London on week-days) must have been that it allowed both Harold and Vita to lead incredibly productive professional lives. Their extra-marital affairs appear to have been secondary (apart from Vita's early affair with Violet Trefusis*). Harold's eldest son, Ben, wrote to Phillip Toynbee as late as September 1968 (Harold died in May), `What is ironical is that neither of them will live in history except as creators of Sissinghurst and for the Diaries [Harold's - they have never been out of print].' That, frankly, could have been good enough but when Nigel published his book in 1973 he made his parents world famous. This biography is recommended but beware that a lot of it reads like a political history book.