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eBook The Colors of Hell download
Fiction
Author: Michael Paine
ISBN: 155773349X
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Publisher Diamond Books; 1st Printing edition (April 1, 1990)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 254
ePUB size: 1279 kb
FB2 size: 1631 kb
DJVU size: 1734 kb
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eBook The Colors of Hell download

by Michael Paine


Michael Paine, The Colors of Hell (Charter, 1990). Paine had the same problem with The Colors of Hell, which has far more in common with the archaeological thrillers of Katherine Neville (The Eight) or Kate Mosse (Labyrinth) than it does with Stephen King or William Peter Blatty.

Michael Paine, The Colors of Hell (Charter, 1990). Plot: a lawyer, Robert Semnarek, is escorting his clients Charlotte and Steve Alderson (mother and son) on a globe-trotting trip to try and find evidence of the whereabouts, or final resting place, of Charlotte's sister, Clare Markham.

Right away you know that you are in for something unusual in "The Colors Of Hell", a historical horror novel, as the first part of the novel takes place in the year 1958. Hey, my birth year, I always knew I was special.

The second being The Colors of Hell (1990) and the third being his last published work The Mummy: Dark Resurrection (2007). In his first novel, Paine opens with the sadistic murder of a young child, but don't worry, the death, like most of the content of all of Paine's novels is hardly sensationalistic, and it will be important to the novel's storyline.

Michael Ralph Paine (June 25, 1928 – March 1, 2018) was an engineer. He became notable after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, because he was an acquaintance of the President's assassin Lee Harvey Oswald. His wife, Ruth Hyde Paine, housed Lee's estranged wife, Marina Oswald, in her home for several months before the assassination until the day after it.

ISBN 10: 155773349X ISBN 13: 9781557733498. Publisher: Diamond Books, 1990. When her sister disappears while investigating a set of legendary artifacts called "the Glass Apostles," Charlotte Alderson journeys to remote regions of Morocco and finds a group of nuns guarding a horrifying secret.

Richard Hell from the late 1970's period. Heavy texture and multiple glazes really bring out the colors of this painting. Richard Hell was the pioneer in the sound and look later copied by many aspiring punk rock musicians

Richard Hell from the late 1970's period. Richard Hell was the pioneer in the sound and look later copied by many aspiring punk rock musicians. I used loose brush strokes and vivid colors capture the energy of this great band. The painting has a strong impasto technique.

Cosplay & Costume Making. acrylic paint 24 color set by artist's loft™.

When her sister disappears while investigating a set of legendary artifacts called "the Glass Apostles," Charlotte Alderson journeys to remote regions of Morocco and finds a group of nuns guarding a horrifying secret
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Right away you know that you are in for something unusual in "The Colors Of Hell", a historical horror novel, as the first part of the novel takes place in the year 1958. Hey, my birth year, I always knew I was special. Ahem, anyway, lawyer Robert Semnarek, his client Charlotte Alderson and her son Steve are in Marrakesh looking for any trace of Charlotte's sister, ex-Tiffany stained glass designer, artist, and forger Clare Markham, who with her male companion Marty Kampinski, had disappeared somewhere in this area sometime in the late nineteen twenties. They get a lead and travel to an isolated mountain range where there is an odd and even more isolated Catholic nunnery where there might be some information as to Clare and Marty's fate.

"The Colors Of Hell" is a novel in three distinct parts. In the first part of this novel, we learn of the existence a special shard of stained glass that Louis Tiffany owns that can pierce flesh without drawing blood or leaving a wound, and which has strange glow to it. It is rumored that the shard was forged with the blood of one of Christ's apostles. Clare and Marty had disappeared while searching for more shards of the blood glass. In the second part of "The Colors Of Hell" Robert and company arrive at the nunnery and discover that there exists a journal that tells of Clare and Marty's journey to discover more of the fragments of the blood glass. It's not pretty.

The third part returns us to 1958 as Steve is acting like a vacuous, spoiled, undisciplined fool and decides that he wants to have sex with a young epileptic nun who turns out to be his cousin. The tension builds as Charlotte and Mother Joseph spar with each other; Steve keeps sneaking into the nunnery to romance Sister Martin, and Robert tries to do his job and mediate everything. There has been some criticism that I have read that mentioned that Paine's early novels always ended in explosive climaxes, and in some of my reviews I have mentioned this. With this novel, I'm glad to stand corrected. While a bit abrupt, "The Colors Of Hell" hardly has an apocalyptic ending.

It should be mentioned that the action in this novel is a bit slow . . . real slow. The supernatural elements really don't kick in until the halfway mark, and even then, its mostly minor stuff. What we are stuck with is a historical novel of manners, decadence, droll contempt, and madness. As we read the Clare's journal we gradually realize that Clare is unbalanced. She's emotionally distant, easily upset, and slow to forgive or forget, coming from an unhappy household she takes Louis Tiffany as a father figure. Clare's also depressive, may have a multi-personality, and is possibly homicidal. By part three we realize that "The Colors Of Hell" is just not going to end well for anybody.

The novel has an undercurrent of both blatant and subtle sexual commentary to it. The lead, and many of the minor, males are constantly described as being "beautiful", "angelic" and in other complimentary ways, male homosexuality is condoned while female homosexuality, and ultimately, heterosexuality is punished. Clare herself may be sexually confused, or bi-sexual or asexual, and not in a good way, there is an instance of incest, and all of the women in the nunnery have male names. Although Paine's penchant for passive/aggressive characters is on full display here as is Paine's love of obscure historically based facts and conspiracies. People like Lon Chaney, Dorothy Parker, Louis Tiffany, Governor Al Smith, and others make appearances, as does the post WWI decadent Berlin.

This is marketed as a novel of screaming horror and it is not. The supernatural in this weird quest/adventure novel works fine, but the horror parts seem jarringly shoehorned in just for commercial purposes. Less an extreme horror novel, this is more of an example of quiet horror, a novel of madness, obsession, and social observation and commentary. This is why the gaudy cover is so misleading, it is of a screaming demon reaching through a shattered stained glass window, and why "The Colors Of Hell" is a stupid title for this creepy understated novel; something like "The Blood Glass", a term actually from the novel, would have worked better.

"The Colors Of Hell" was Paine's last novel before he was laid off by the paperback industry, and his next novel wouldn't appear until FIFTEEN YEARS LATER in 2005, and this is the novel that may be referenced in his "Steel Ghosts". If you're looking for a novel of extreme horror stay away, if you're looking for a quiet, (mostly) subtle, and creepy commercial novel of madness and decadence this novel is for you.
Impala Frozen
Michael Paine, The Colors of Hell (Charter, 1990)

Long long ago, in the dark ages of 2002, I reviewed Michael Paine's novel Owl Light [http://www.amazon.com/review/R2FHMCXOXCHBKG/]. It's a fantastic book that suffered from mismarketing; Owl Light is no more a horror novel than Allan Eckert's The Scarlet Mansion is, but that's how Charter tried to sell it. Paine had the same problem with The Colors of Hell, which has far more in common with the archaeological thrillers of Katherine Neville (The Eight) or Kate Mosse (Labyrinth) than it does with Stephen King or William Peter Blatty.

Plot: a lawyer, Robert Semnarek, is escorting his clients Charlotte and Steve Alderson (mother and son) on a globe-trotting trip to try and find evidence of the whereabouts, or final resting place, of Charlotte's sister, Clare Markham. At issue is a nine million dollar inheritance, which certainly wasn't a pittance at the time the story is set (1958). Clare was one of the Tiffany company's finest designers, and the three of them have traced her to Marrakesh, where a gone-to-seed hotel sports two stained glass windows that look suspiciously like her work. While there, they hear rumors of an ancient nunnery built into the wall of a cliff—one that is known for sporting legendary stained glass windows. After confirming that Clare Markham was indeed at the Marrakesh hotel, the three of them set out for the convent to see if Clare had stopped there. Each of the three seems to find his or her desire there, but upon scratching the surface of some desires, we find they are best left alone...

Where the book really takes a turn into archaeological-thriller territory is in the second section, about which I can't say much without spoilers. In vague terms, it takes place thirty years previously and involves a search for ancient stained glass that, legend has it, was colored with the blood of the saints. Right out of an Indiana Jones movie, that, but with a much darker and more despairing tone to it. Once the book flips back to 1958, that darker tone comes with it. Not that you didn't realize this was going to be a tragedy from the first few pages, but...

The tl;dr version: like every other Michael Paine novel that I have read, it's a very good novel that has fallen into unjust obscurity. Paine is a writer who deserves to be rediscovered; haunt a few local used paperback stores and you should be able to come with some of his stuff quick enough. They're well worth the time and effort. *** ½