» » Swallow
eBook Swallow download
Fiction
Author: Sefi Atta
ISBN: 1566568331
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Pages 296 pages
Publisher Interlink Pub Group; Translation edition (July 2, 2010)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 629
ePUB size: 1805 kb
FB2 size: 1334 kb
DJVU size: 1262 kb
Other formats: mbr doc mobi azw

eBook Swallow download

by Sefi Atta


No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a. retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording or. otherwise, without the prior permission in writing of the publisher. Swallow, by Sefi Atta. 1st American ed. p. cm. ISBN 978-1-56656-833-3 (pb.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A new novel from the winner of the Wole Soyinka Prize for African Literature It is the mid-1980s in Lagos, Nigeria.

Sefi Atta (born January 1964) is a prize-winning Nigerian author and playwright

Sefi Atta (born January 1964) is a prize-winning Nigerian author and playwright. Awards she has received include the 2006 Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa and the 2009 Noma Award for Publishing in Africa.

Again and again Atta’s writings tugs at the heart, at the conscience

Again and again Atta’s writings tugs at the heart, at the conscience. At the same time, reflecting the resilience of the Lagosians whose lives she explores, humour is almost constant, effervescent, most often satirical slant.

A new novel from the winner of the Wole Soyinka Prize for African Literature. At thirty-nine, Deola Bello, a Nigerian expatriate in London, is dissatisfied with being single and working overseas. Deola’s journey is as much about evading others’ expectations to get to the heart of her frustration as it is about exposing the differences between foreign images of Africa and the realities of contemporary Nigerian life. Deola’s urgent, incisive voice captivates and guides us through the intricate layers and vivid scenes of a life lived across continents Read online.

Atta's book has all of the sensitivity and character description you could ever ask for, but the plot leaves Sefi Atta's Swallow is nothing like what I expected

Atta's book has all of the sensitivity and character description you could ever ask for, but the plot leaves Sefi Atta's Swallow is nothing like what I expected

Read Swallow, by Sefi Atta online on Bookmate – A new novel from the winner of the Wole Soyinka Prize for African LiteratureIt is the mid-1980s in Lagos, Nigeria, and the government's War against In.

Read Swallow, by Sefi Atta online on Bookmate – A new novel from the winner of the Wole Soyinka Prize for African LiteratureIt is the mid-1980s in Lagos, Nigeria, and the government's War against I. A new novel from the winner of the Wole Soyinka Prize for African LiteratureIt is the mid-1980s in Lagos, Nigeria, and the government's War against Indiscipline is in full operation.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

In the 1980s in Lagos, the government's War Against Indiscipline and austerity measures are in full swing. A succession of unfortunate events leads Tolani, a bank secretary, to be persuaded by her roommate Rose to consider drug trafficking as a way to make a living.

A new novel from the winner of the Wole Soyinka Prize for African Literature It is the mid-1980s in Lagos, Nigeria, and the government's War against Indiscipline is in full operation. Amid poverty and tight rules and regulations, women especially must sacrifice dignity and safety in order to find work and peace. Tolani Ajao is a secretary working at Federal Community Bank. A succession of unfortunate events leads Tolani's roommate and volatile friend Rose to persuade her to consider drug trafficking as an alternative means of making a living. Tolani's struggle with temptation forces her to reconsider her morality and that of her mother, Arike; Swallow weaves the stories of the two women intricately together in a vivid, unforgettable portrayal of Tolani's turbulent journey of self-discovery.
Bloodhammer
In her novel Swallow, Sefi Atta gives us the story of Tolani Ajao and her obstinate friend and roommate Rose. Tolani and Rose are two women living in Lagos, Nigeria during the eighties, and the story follows their struggles to survive in an urban world that is adverse to women and hostile towards all.
From its very beginning the novel impresses us with the dangers of transportation, both public and private, in Lagos. The bus carrying the narrator, Tolani, and Rose nearly overturns, flinging its screaming passengers and conductor about before righting itself and carrying on with its journey as if nothing ever happened. This is only one of many stories illuminating the perils of the road in Lagos, and the characters are quick to turn their attention back to more important matters. Unpleasant bus rides and the stench, danger, and discomfort of public transport is evident throughout the novel, as it is in much of Nigerian fiction, but this particular incident sets the tone for the novel as a whole and seems to reflect more than the various incidents of public transport. The novel is filled with sudden shocks of danger and distress, and Tolani is in a constant struggle to regain her balance and to find satisfaction in a life that seems consistently willing to crush her.
The daughter of a famous drummer, Tolani comes from the small town of Makoku. Once a predominant farming community ruled by a royal family, the Makoku of Tolani's youth -- and especially that of her mother's youth -- has transformed into a place filled with service businesses, shrinking farms, and diminished forests. The main story narrated by Tolani is interspersed with pieces of Tolani's mother's story and the Makoku she grew up in with Tolani's father. Arike (Tolani's mother) narrates these fragments of her past which serve to illuminate the transition of Makoku towards the present and make sense of both her and Tolani's past and present circumstances.
Both Tolani and Arike's stories involve their separate efforts towards bettering themselves and their possible futures in a place and time where independent women are met with suspicion and malice -- especially for Arike. In Lagos, Tolani attempts to deal with her relationship issues with Sanwo, her boyfriend of over two years who continues to evade marrying her despite his own promises and her pressures. Tolani's boss, Mr. Salako, has recently fired Rose and forced Tolani into her old position. Mr. Salako is basically your typical scumbag-boss type -- perverted, overtly pretentious and self-centered , and completely ignorant -- and he has taken it upon himself to make Tolani's job as difficult as possible. All the while Rose is at home, now unemployed and spending her days on the couch, much to Tolani's uneasiness and aggravation.
Poverty and disappointment eventually drive both women towards the offers of a wealthy drug trafficker, leaving Tolani questioning the direction her life is taking and striving to find a moral footing in a place where honor is reserved for the rich and morality requires payment in Naira. The bulk of the novel is devoted towards Tolani's journey to find herself and a path towards future happiness and contentment with the past.
Although much of the novel is unique to the experiences of Nigeria and centers around the sights, smells, dangers, and details of Lagos, its themes also speak to the universal. The struggle to find oneself as a woman in a male dominated world is something I think most women can relate to -- albeit on different levels -- and the difficulty of coming to terms with the skeletons of ones past and finding a path towards the future is equally relatable. Sefi Atta makes the tensions between the traditional and the contemporary, between the city and the village, and between the individual and the crushing pressures of life are both universally relatable and uniquely Nigerian.
Some might find the plot of the novel boring -- many things happen and yet it seems that nothing really happens. The story is focused much more on character development than compelling plot-line, and the lack of identifiable chapter breaks can be quite exhausting. However, Atta's style and prose are excellent and the way she has sutured together the drama-filled stories of her characters keeps the novel flowing and readable.
Danskyleyn
I just could not put this book down. Rich . Deep. Beautifully written. Well researched. Makes the reader move into the writers mind.
Rleillin
Got to me when expected, great story, great read, very well written, happy with the author's work. Can't wait to read more!
Agalas
Tolani is a single woman living with a roommate, Rose, in Lagos, Nigeria. In the beginning of the story, both women work in the same office where red tape, biases, and corruption abound. Rose is fired and Tolani is made to take her place with Rose's immoral boss, Mr. Salako. Besides the relationship of these two women, Tolani's mother's story seeps intermittently into the plot, giving it even more depth.

Later, while Rose takes up with a drug dealer, Tolani loses her boyfriend. What happens to these two women at the end of the story, and more so, what happens internally to Tolani is a powerful tale. It addresses women's psychological struggles and their fights to find their rightful place in a corrupt society.

This book was an eye-opener for me. I knew little if nothing about Nigeria, about its tribal prejudices, city and country life, civil war, and corruption in government and society, but I was especially impressed by the uniquely strong women in the story, strong despite superstition, social prejudice, and difficult everyday life, and also, I thought their camaraderie despite everything was truly awesome.

What most pleases me about this novel is its skillful portrayal of fully developed characters. It is those characters that carry the plot through the minute details of everyday life. In the hands of a lesser writer, this story could have been a bore, but Sefi Atta's pen has made it a literary winner.
Ieslyaenn
The book opens with a dialogue between two friends on the bus, on their way to work, after narrowly escaping a possible accident. Rose talks a lot, and preferably about what her friend Tolani should do with her life and her boyfriend, while Tolani herself only gives laconic replies. Both face an uphill struggle trying to survive in the chaotic metropolis of Lagos, Nigeria, in a society dominated by men who tend to be unreliable, molesting, or even criminal.

Tolani doesn't appear to be very good at getting her way through dialogue, even though there is a lot of it going on. Somehow, it never goes her way, and she always ends up swallowing her pride. Her employers kick her around, her useless boyfriend squanders her savings, her mother tells her everything except what she needs to know, and her friend Rose signs the pair of them up for a trip as drug mules, which, again, requires Tolani to swallow her pride, not to mention a condom filled with cocaine.

With its colourful representation of everyday life in Nigeria, this short novel (like Atta's debut, Everything good will come) is very engaging in the short term, for 10 or 20 pages. I especially enjoyed the swipes at us western people ("oyinbo" seems to be the Yoruba equivalent to "gringo"), such as: "... oyinbos write theories about things they can't understand, and by the time they finish, you can't understand either, even if they're writing about you." (p. 167) However, given the very slow pace of the progress our heroine makes, the reading experience is also a little bit frustrating in the longer term. This may very well be intentional, reflecting the frustration that this woman suffers every day. Only in the very last paragraph she seems to have picked herself up. "It's my turn to speak," she says. About time, too.
Kulwes
This book is beautiful. Sefi Atta is a great writer. I really enjoyed getting a taste of what Lagos is like, even though I've never been there. Although I loved the book, the only thing I disliked was the ending-- I wanted just a little bit more.