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Fiction
Author: Maeve Haran
ISBN: 031255415X
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Pages 384 pages
Publisher St. Martin's Press; 1 edition (March 2, 2010)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 312
ePUB size: 1617 kb
FB2 size: 1987 kb
DJVU size: 1428 kb
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eBook The Lady and the Poet download

by Maeve Haran


ALSO BY MAEVE HARAN FICTION Having It All Scenes from the Sex War It Takes Two A Family Affair All That She Wants Soft Touch . The Froth on the Cappuccion. The lady and the poet. This is a work of fiction.

ALSO BY MAEVE HARAN FICTION Having It All Scenes from the Sex War It Takes Two A Family Affair All That She Wants Soft Touch Baby Come Back The Farmer Wants a Wife. All of the characters, organizations, and events portrayed in this novel are either products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Printed in the United States of America. For information, address St. Martin’s Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, .

It had been almost a week now since I had spoken out and there had been no sign of my aunt relenting. Dress Mistress Ann in plain clothing. Today she will assist you and Mercy at your tasks. l need to take off your fancy partlet, mistress. I could see Joan thought me one step away from Bedlam to turn down a place at Court in exchange for washing dirty linen. And those fine embroidered sleeves as well!’.

It was probably what I liked most about the book. She wrote eight more contemporary novels, one work of non-fiction, and three years ago began to write historical fiction.

Set against the sumptuousness and intrigues of Queen Elizabeth I's court, this powerful novel reveals the untold love affair between the famous poet John Donne and Ann More, the passionate woman who, against all odds, became his wife. Ann More, fiery and spirited daughter of the Mores of Loseley House in Surrey, came to London destined for a life at the court of Queen Elizabeth and an advantageous marriage.

Maeve Haran, a former television producer, graduated in law from Oxford and has since written eleven contemporary novels which have sold around the world

Maeve Haran, a former television producer, graduated in law from Oxford and has since written eleven contemporary novels which have sold around the world. The poetry of the metaphysical poet, John Donne, has been a lifelong passion and inspired her to write her first historical novel The Lady and the Poet. She lives in London with her husband and children.

Listen to books in audio format. Sex and the City for grown-ups" Sunday Times. There she encountered John Donne, the darkly attractive young poet who was secretary to her uncle, the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal

Listen to books in audio format. Stella Ainsworth has settled for suburban peace with a pedantic husband, a dissatisfied daughter and a clutch of beloved grandchildren - who all take her presence in their lives for granted. There she encountered John Donne, the darkly attractive young poet who was secretary to her uncle, the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal. He was unlike any man she had ever met-angry, clever, witty, and in her eyes, insufferably arrogant and careless of women.

Haran, Maeve The lady and the poet/Maeve Haran. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to others, worlds on worlds have shown, Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one. ed. p. cm. ISBN 978-0-312-55415-6 1. Donne, John, 1572–1631-Fiction. My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest, Where can we find two better hemispheres Without sharp north, without declining west? Whatever dies, was not mixed equally; If our two loves be one, or, thou and I Love so alike, that none can slacken, none can die.

The lady is Lady Ann More, daughter to one ambitious George More who desires to marry her off to the man with the greatest title to his name. The poet is Master John Donne who holds no favor in her father's eyes. The two fall in love quite by accident

The lady is Lady Ann More, daughter to one ambitious George More who desires to marry her off to the man with the greatest title to his name. The two fall in love quite by accident The Queen only has one brief appearance. This is not about Elizabeth. the lady and the poet meet. Their meeting is not favorable for either one at first, but over time they come to grow a friendship that eventually leads to something more and forbidden.

Haran imagines a passionate, tempestuous courtship with clandestine meetings, secret . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Haran imagines a passionate, tempestuous courtship with clandestine meetings, secret letters, go-betweens, and many obstacles and setbacks. Some setbacks are a matter of record. Donne, thrown into prison for secretly marrying Ann, summed up their situation in a note to his new wife: 'John Donne, Anne Donne, Undone. For authenticity of time and place, Maeve Haran's The Lady and the Poet is unmatched in recent historical fiction. Here is Queen Elizabeth I's world brought richly to life.

Set against the sumptuousness and intrigues of Queen Elizabeth I’s court, this powerful novel reveals the untold love affair between the famous poet John Donne and Ann More, the passionate woman who, against all odds, became his wife.

Ann More, fiery and spirited daughter of the Mores of Loseley House in Surrey, came to London destined for a life at the court of Queen Elizabeth and an advantageous marriage. There she encountered John Donne, the darkly attractive young poet who was secretary to her uncle, the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal. He was unlike any man she had ever met—angry, clever, witty, and in her eyes, insufferably arrogant and careless of women. Yet as they were thrown together, Donne opened Ann’s eyes to a new world of passion and sensuality.

But John Donne—Catholic by background in an age when it was deadly dangerous, tainted by an alluring hint of scandal—was the kind of man her status-conscious father distrusted and despised.

The Lady and the Poet tells the story of the forbidden love between one of our most admired poets and a girl who dared to rebel against her family and the conventions of her time. They gave up everything to be together and their love knew no bounds.

Dellevar
THE LADY AND THE POET is a tale about the wonderful Jacobean poet John Donne (1572-1633) and his wife Ann More (1584-1617) a distant cousin of Sir Thomas More, the Catholic martyr who was beheaded by Henry VIII.

The story begins in 1598, when Ann is fourteen years old. Her elder sister Bett is about to be married to a "suitable" bridegroom chosen by her father. What this usually meant was that a teenaged girl was forced to mate with a gentleman old enough to be her father. But Bett is saintly and patient, and goes to her marriage with a smile on her face. A year later, she is dead in childbirth, aged about sixteen.

Now it is Ann's turn. This time, her father has chosen a well-favored young man, one Thomas Manners, who must be a forebear of the famous aristocratic family of the 17th and 18th centuries. However, Thomas's father doesn't entirely approve of the match, and spends three long years disputing the amount of dowry that Ann is to bring.

The whole plot turns on this fact, which means that Ann is never actually betrothed to Thomas. Enter John Donne, a witty poet, and employed by Ann's uncle, the Keeper of the Seal. Ann is fourteen, Donne is twenty-six. It is not exactly love at first sight, but Donne is impressed by the young girl's education, and perceptive comments. For Ann is no ordinary young lady, but can read Latin and Greek, courtesy of her grandfather.

Naturally, Donne is seen as completely unsuitable by Ann's family. Naturally, Ann's father has a way of behaving like a two-year-old in a temper tantrum when his will is crossed.

I won't tell the rest of the story, so as not to spoil the novel for you.

This was an enjoyable read, despite some problems with pacing and story structure.

STORY STRUCTURE: I was bothered by the beginning because it seemed to start and then re-start again a few pages later. I expected the novel to begin at Bett's wedding day, but in fact it starts slightly before. I am not sure why Ms. Shepard chose to do this, because it forces the reader to read the same information twice, giving it this start-restart effect. An easy fix is to cut the beginning and start on the wedding day.

PACING: The characters of Ann More and John Donne were so well-drawn, they turned the pages of the novel for me. But as it went along, it became increasingly repetitive as the author detailed every conceivable thing that went wrong. This was unfortunate because it made the story flat and uninteresting. I reckon that a good 50 pages could have and should have been cut, which would have streamlined the story and quickened the pacing.

Despite these misgivings, this novel is a good read for those of you who have read John Donne's poems, and wish to know more about the (very) young woman who captured his heart. Four stars.
Karon
Maeve Haran's novel The Lady and the Poet chronicles the romance and ultimate marriage of British poet John Donne and Ann More, whose father is a third generation knight in the employ of Queen Elizabeth. He has in mind a much more prestigious match for his daughter than a poet who is the son of an ironmonger, but Ann has romantic sensibilities and strong opinions, and John Donne is who she wants. Haran's novel is told from the point of view of Ann More, giving voice to a lady who is historically silent. The novel is ultimately a historical romance that describes how the poet and his lady fell in love and managed to marry, despite her father's wishes.

One of my gauges of whether I loved a novel or not is my ability to put it down. I never had much trouble putting this one down. I wasn't on the edge of my seat for John Donne or Lady Ann. Of course, I knew how it would end, but that doesn't always prevent me from flipping madly to see how it ended up that way. On the other hand, it was a well-researched, historically accurate description of life late in Queen Elizabeth's reign. I enjoyed some of those historical details. I enjoyed learning more about the Donnes, and historical evidence does support the notion that their marriage was a love match. I did mark a couple of passages that I enjoyed. In one, George More, Ann's father, is admonishing Ann to stay away from Donne by describing his verse:

"[T]here is one whose company I would fain you shun, since it befits not an innocent maiden. Master John Donne. Your uncle thinks highly of him yet I came across some verse of his being handed round the Inns of Court and laughed over by its inmates like naughty schoolboys. It seemed to be both lewd, and, even worse, satirical." (104)

I'm not sorry I read it because of the insight it gave me into the life of John Donne, whose poetry I teach my British Literature students. However, it never really grabbed and convinced me I needed to keep turning pages.
Lost Python
Who was the woman who inspired late Elizabethan poet John Donne to write his greatest love poetry?

The woman for whose love he sacrificed his career and retreated to the country?

The woman whose death he mourned his entire life?

Maeve Haran's 'The Lady and the Poet' is a fictionalized account of the romance between poet John Donne and Ann More, niece of Donne's benefactor, the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal.

Few facts are known about the historical Ann, but Haran's creation is a bright, lively young woman well worthy of the poet's love.
The fictive Ann is learned and wise at fourteen and sure enough of her love for John at seventeen to renounce family and fortune to remain at his side.

Haran's lovers are nice people; their physical attraction is real, and their love story is both carefully wrought and believable.

At the time the couple met, Donne was acting as secretary to Ann's uncle by marriage, the Lord Keeper of the Seal. His risque poetry was the talk of the Inns of Court and his Catholic background made many suspicious of him. He was clever, witty, and carried within him a yet untapped depth. Ann was 'up from the country' where she had been reared and well educated by doting grandparents. A bright, shining young girl on the cusp of womanhood, she and the 'forbidden' Donne were instantly aware of each other.

Haran's novel is carefully written and a delight to read. Her characters come alive. The plotting is well done and her command of historical fact is never a burden to the reader.

Five stars. "The Lady and the Poet" should appeal to those who enjoy historical fiction and those who appreciate a well turned phrase.