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eBook The Snake Catcher's Daughter (Mamur Zapt Mysteries) download
Fiction
Author: Michael Pearce
ISBN: 1590581148
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Pages 254 pages
Publisher Poisoned Pen Press; Reprint edition (March 1, 2003)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 849
ePUB size: 1237 kb
FB2 size: 1267 kb
DJVU size: 1270 kb
Other formats: lit lrf docx lrf

eBook The Snake Catcher's Daughter (Mamur Zapt Mysteries) download

by Michael Pearce


The Mamur Zapt himself is suspected, but is he above suspicion? Owen’s investigation takes him into hitherto uncharted territory: the underworld of Cairo and the dangerous profession of snake-catching.

The Mamur Zapt himself is suspected, but is he above suspicion? Owen’s investigation takes him into hitherto uncharted territory: the underworld of Cairo and the dangerous profession of snake-catchin. ead on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

The Snake Catcher's Daughter. I remain a fan of the Mamur Zapt series and of Pearce, and I liked The Snake Catcher's Daughter, but primarily for its outstanidng descriptions of the rhythms and conflicts within Arabic culture. One person found this helpful.

In this engrossing murder mystery set in the Egypt of the 1900s, the Mamur Zapt finds himself under . Books related to The Snake-Catcher’s Daughter (Mamur Zapt, Book 8). Skip this list.

In this engrossing murder mystery set in the Egypt of the 1900s, the Mamur Zapt finds himself under threat from a campai. The Mamur Zapt, Head of Cairo's secret police, finds himself in a compromising position. The city’s senior policemen are the subject of a smear campaign, a stinging attack which raises uncomfortable questions about their integrity. The Mamur Zapt himself is suspected, but is he above suspicion? Owen’s investigation takes him into hitherto uncharted territory: the underworld of Cairo and the dangerous profession of snake-catchin. bout this book.

The Mamur Zapt and the Donkey-vous. The Men Behind: A Mamur Zapt Mystery.

book by Michael Pearce. The Mamur Zapt and the Donkey-vous. The Mamur Zapt and the Girl in the Nile. The Mamur Zapt and the Spoils of Egypt.

Author Michael Pearce. Books by Michael Pearce: The Camel of Destruction. 10 1. 9, 10. The Snake Catcher's Daughter. 10. A Dead Man in Trieste.

The Snake Catcher's Daughter book. Michael Pearce's tales of Mamur Zapt bring the essence of Cairo to life in the first decade of the 20th century. Snake Catcher's Daughter, The: A Mamur Zapt Mystery (Mamur Zapt Mysteries). 1590581148 (ISBN13: 9781590581148). In this volume Gareth Owen (Mamur Zapt), the Khedive's head of the not-so-secret police uncovers a twisting plot to unseat three British officials, himself included.

Someone has thrown a cobra in the men's who happens to make quick work of the snake. Auntie-Nanuuq, January 17, 2016.

And what of the Mamur Zapt himself? He may be the British head of the city's Secret Police, but is he above suspicion? After all, he does have an Egyptian mistress, placing him not only under the uncomfortable suspicion of having divided loyalties, but bringing him under her own stern scrutiny. Owen's attempts to get answers and avoid political (and personal) embarrassment take him into uncharted territory, the world of Cairo's female rites. And more terrifyingly, into one of Egypt's traditional crafts – snake catching.

Home Michael Pearce The Snake Catcher's Daughter, A Mamur Zapt Mystery. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: The Snake Catcher's Daughter, A Mamur Zapt. The Snake Catcher's Daughter, A Mamur Zapt Mystery. Published by Poisoned Pen Press, 2003. Condition: Very Good - Hardcover. Publisher: Poisoned Pen Press. Publication Date: 2003. Authors: Michael Pearce

The Snake Catcher's Daughter. Authors: Michael Pearce. On the face of it, it confirms Philipides’s story: there was an investigation going on into the corruption in the Police Force, it was being conducted, quite properly, by the Mamur Zapt, and Philipides might well have been acting as agent provocateur. What evidence there is supports Philipides. The two were in it together, said Owen.

Someone is running a campaign to discredit Cairo's senior police officials. Is Garvin, the Commandant, playing power games, or is he trying to get to the bottom of the allegations of corruption? What about Garvin's senior deputy, McPhee, a man who might finally be going round the bend? And what of the Mamur Zapt himself? He may be the British head of the city's Secret Police, but is he above suspicion? After all, he does have an Egyptian mistress, placing him not only under the uncomfortable suspicion of having divided loyalties, but bringing him under her own stern scrutiny.

Owen's attempts to get answers and avoid political (and personal) embarrassment take him into uncharted territory, the world of Cairo's female rites. And more terrifyingly, into one of Egypt's traditional crafts - snake catching. How do you milk a cobra? Do snakes have ears? Can they be tamed? Can a mere woman fill the traditional role of snake catcher without the undying opposition of the Rifa'i - and without losing the plague of Egypt?

Wizard
Have read many Pearce books and enjoy them all. The Mamur Zapt books are well written and the stories about Egypt are interesting to me as i really don't know the place nor the time of British occupation. Having said that I found the ending to be confusing and perhaps meant to be that way and chasing back to make sense out of character involvement is a hassle with a KIndle.
Dainris
was rather slow going and not as heart stopping as the earlier books in the series. The problem in this book is the bureaucracy and, as we all know, that is a very slow moving complex problem with any government. On to the next one.
Delan
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It has many twists and describes Egypt in the early part of the 20th century.
Brightfury
_The Snake Catcher's Daughter_ is at best a mediocre mystery, the crisis involving a coodrinated attack to discredit and embarass senior British officials in fin-de-scile Egypt. Were it not for Pearce's familiarity with Arab (and Egyptian) culture and his careful eye for detail, it would be a two-star book.

These details include the cultural blending and sharing from the Arabs, Copts, Greeks and Sudanese, and the remnants of pre-Islamic Persian and Greek rituals and celebrations that have, over the centuries, become Egyptianized. This makes for fascinating reading that is more akin to a travelougue or cultural commentary than what it supposes to be, a political mystery. The conservative Islamic (and Arabic) attitudes towards gender roles, social position and one's loyalties - to family, religion and occupation in a rapidly changing and modernizing world still ring true today, as Pearce shows the reluctance and suspicion on one hand with the frustration of those who embrace them on the other.

I remain a fan of the Mamur Zapt series and of Pearce, and I liked _The Snake Catcher's Daughter_, but primarily for its outstanidng descriptions of the rhythms and conflicts within Arabic culture.
Anayaron
This tremendously enjoyable book brings alive the Cairo of the early twentieth century, when British 'advisors' assist with running the country.

The Mamur Zapt or head of the Secret Police, is a Welshman who is thus outside the ranks of the Cambridge old boys who run every other British aspect of the administration. Gareth Owen finds that someone is trying to smear the police with possible corruption. A man who is keen to watch an ancient ritual is missing, and he is eventually found in a cistern full of snakes. Who is responsible? All the threads tie in and the snake-catcher's daughter, an exception in many ways to the women of her society, because of assisting in her father's occupation, is called upon to display her skills more than once.

We meet rich and poor, traditional and modern, helpful and scheming people. Description is pared to a minimum in order to get on with the story in the scorching, dusty heat. I had not read any earlier books in this series but enjoyed this one thoroughly and I will be looking out for more.
Dibei
When Deputy Commandant McPhee fails to show up for work everyone becomes concerned because that is so out of character. Commandant Garvin assigns Owen Gareth, the Mamur Zapt, to make inquiries over the latter's objection that this is not a political matter, as those are the only ones he, as the local head of the British secret police, should investigate.
Seeking McPhee's camel as the easiest means of finding the missing cop, Owen locates the unconscious man amidst a pit filled with snakes. The daughter of Abu the snake catcher helps rescue McPhee. When he comes around, McPhee explains that out of curiosity he tried to attend a Zzarr ritual performed by a local witch-priestess, but someone apparently drugged him. The British presence at a local religious ritual causes outbursts and turmoil, but makes the Mamur Zapt wonder if someone is trying to discredit the Cairo police. Could that person be recently released from jail rogue cop Philipides or one of the current law enforcement leadership? The Mamur Zapt seeks the truth, but first must get McPhee and Garvin out of town to prevent a nasty Egyptian backlash.
The eighth Mamur Zapt police procedural is an insightful tale that provides an intriguing look at Cairo under the British protectorate. The story line contains a delightful investigative tale, but is more a historical novel than a law enforcement book. The characters are well drawn even if McPhee seems too bubblebrained to be more than just a political appointee. The period tidbits are quite enlightening and Owen's inquest is fun to observe so that the audience gains a pleasing intelligent tale.
Harriet Klausner