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eBook Milton in America download
Fiction
Author: Peter Ackroyd
ISBN: 0749386258
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Pages 276 pages
Publisher Mandarin; New Ed edition (1997)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 634
ePUB size: 1735 kb
FB2 size: 1685 kb
DJVU size: 1140 kb
Other formats: lit lrf doc mobi

eBook Milton in America download

by Peter Ackroyd


Milton in America book.

Milton in America book. So why did I read this book? Because Peter Ackroyd wrote it and because Ackroyd made me look at Thomas More in a new way. He doesn’t quite do the same here, though that doesn’t seem to be the intent. The most disconcerting thing about this alternate history is the shifting perspectives but once you get use to that this novel flies.

When Peter Ackroyd, one of Britain's undisputed literary masters, writes a new novel, it is a literary event

When Peter Ackroyd, one of Britain's undisputed literary masters, writes a new novel, it is a literary event. In Milton in America the poet flees England for the New World, where he proceeds to establish a Puritan community and to become increasingly obsessed and repressive as years go by. Milton's madness reaches a bloody climax when a group of Roman Catholics sets up a settlement nearby. Admirers of Ackroyd's previous works will find this one intriguing; admirers of the historical Milton might well be outraged by this radical revision of the great man's life.

When Peter Ackroyd, one of Britain's undisputed literary masters, writes a new novel, it is a literary event. Now, with his trademark blending of historical fact and fictive fancy, Ackroyd has placed the towering poet of Paradise Lost in the new Eden that is colonial America. John Milton, aging, blind, fleeing the restoration of English monarchy and all the vain trappings that go with it ("misrule" in his estimation), comes to New England, where he is adopted by a community of fellow puritans as their leader.

1999 The Plato Papers. 2000 The Mystery of Charles Dickens.

For the British academic, see Peter Ackroyd (Biblical scholar). From 2003 to 2005, Ackroyd wrote a six-book non-fiction series (Voyages Through Time), intended for readers as young as eight, his first work for children. The critically acclaimed series-described as "Not just sound-bite snacks for short attention spans, but unfolding feasts that leave you with a sense of wonder" by The Sunday Times is an extensive narrative of key periods in world history. 1996 Milton in America. 1999 The Plato Papers.

Peter Ackroyd's Milton in America is a rewriting of history, wondering "what if ?". .Note that reaction to this book was less than enthusiastic, and that it apparently did not sell particularly well, especially in the United States

Peter Ackroyd's Milton in America is a rewriting of history, wondering "what if ?" The premise of the novel is that in early 1660 the English poet John Milton (already blind and famous, but not yet the author of Paradise Lost or Samson Agonistes) decided that he had to flee England, fearing execution for his support of Cromwell and the Commonwealth now that Charles II was on the verge of restoring the monarchy. Note that reaction to this book was less than enthusiastic, and that it apparently did not sell particularly well, especially in the United States.

An alternate history novel in which the 17th Century English writer, John Milton, emigrates to America to escape the wrath of the royalists for his Puritan views. He is elected leader of a Puritan colony in New England and leads it in a war against a Catholic colony. A tale of religious intolerance.

Many of his conceits make it difficult to determine who is speaking and when the action is taking place. His characters, however, are very realistically drawn and Milton comes across as pompous and arrogant, yet a true believer in the faith he professes. On the other hand, Goosequill serves as Milton's guide and foil. While Milton is dour, Goosequill delights in life. Milton has an educated sense of humor, Goosequill laughs at pratfalls.

The poet John Milton was a difficult man who lived in difficult times.

The poet John Milton is transposed to the New World, where he has travelled to flee the tyranny of the Old. His adventures with his amanuensis, Goosequill, are by turns picaresque and delightful. However, Paradise Found will ultimately be lost in the most appalling and bloody circumstances.
Gavigamand
I'll leave it to other reviewers to summarize the plot of this excellent novel, instead calling your attention to the significant episode when Milton disappears from his Puritan village for 6 weeks, regains his lost sight, and is welcomed as an equal when adopted by an native tribe--whose mysterious animism he, in turn, adopts. We see a great 17th-century intellect overwhelmed by a 21st-century spirituality, and we contemplate the structure of faith, intellect, history and truth. Structure is a theme, too, as again Ackroyd's modus operandi is a strand of narratives and narrators whose knot of stories are worth the reader's untying. Of course, Ackroyd's protagonist is a Milton, not the Milton; and this Milton is a doer, not a writer. As another English revolutionary, GBS's John Tanner, said, "He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches." So the novel never mentions "Paradise Lost" because Ackroyd's Milton has come to America to regain the paradise--to `do' paradise--rather than stagnate in Restoration London to teach about a paradise in an epic poem. To take off from Stanley Fish's title on "Paradise Lost," we are surprised by Milton's virtue when he becomes our post-Christian co-religionist. By far, this is Ackroyd's best book from the 14 novels, biographies and critical studies of his that I've read. And the best Milton I've read in a many a year.
Sharpbrew
Peter Ackroyd has a frustrating habit of taking absolutely wonderful premises, such as this one, and turning them into quite dull books. Occasionally he writes wonderfully, but he appears to have no idea of human emotion, and as normal his characters here are like stilted wooden puppets.
Faegal
Peter Ackroyd has always struck me as a Jack of all trades and master of none, whether novelist, biographer or historian.

This novel which imagines that John Milton ended up in America, where he apparently considered going when the monarchy was restored and he was in danger as a result of his support of Cromwell, is dire. In it, the blind, aged Milton blunders about the ship taking him to his new home where he lands in a tempest that kills everyone else except him and his faithful servant he calls Goosequill. There are lots of quotes from Milton's works and lashings of religion as the blind poet faces his new life. However, there is none of the skill, tragedy or comedy of Anthony Burgess's books on Shakespeare which are equally over the top.