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eBook At the Sign of the Sugared Plum download
Fiction
Author: Mary Hooper
ISBN: 0747561249
Subcategory: Contemporary
Pages 176 pages
Publisher Bloomsbury Pub Ltd (July 31, 2003)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 806
ePUB size: 1678 kb
FB2 size: 1114 kb
DJVU size: 1134 kb
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eBook At the Sign of the Sugared Plum download

by Mary Hooper


Mary Hooper was able to write an entertaining and thought provoking read about the Great Plague for YA readers .

Mary Hooper was able to write an entertaining and thought provoking read about the Great Plague for YA readers, that holds the attention of adults as well. I wouldn't recommend it to my 11 year old niece yet, she will have to wait a few more years, some of the scenes would probably be too disturbing. Eager to get to London, where her older sister Sarah runs a small sweetmeats shop called "The Sugared Plum," and where she hopes to see all the wonders of the great metropolis - the grand buildings, and warren-like labyrinth of streets; the lords and ladies in their fashionable attire - young country-girl Hannah is oblivious to all the warnings signs along the way

Mary Hooper is a very popular writer for children and young adults

Mary Hooper is a very popular writer for children and young adults. Mary's brilliant historical novels, At the House of the Magician, By Royal Command, The Betrayal, At the Sign of the Sugared Plum, Petals in the Ashes and The Extraordinary Life and Times of Eliza Rose, have a huge fan base, as do her contemporary novels for teenagers. Mary is very much in demand for her events at literary festivals and schools.

There was no sign of Abby, however, and most of the quality were in sedan chairs or carriages, with only the middling and poorer sort on foot.

Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Bloomsbury PublishingReleased: Jul 4, 2011ISBN: 9781408825440Format: book. There was no sign of Abby, however, and most of the quality were in sedan chairs or carriages, with only the middling and poorer sort on foot.

At the Sign of the Sugared Plum Glossaryatonement being in harmony with God, from the 16th-century phrase at onement. cabalistic sign a sign used in a secret or occult doctrine or science ne white linen or cotton fabric. charnel house a building or vault in which bones or corpses are kept. Or pickpocket who stole by cutting the drawstrings of money purses. electuary a purgative medicine mixed with honey or sugar syrup in some sweet confection

Series: At the Sign of the Sugared Plum 1. File: RAR, 392 KB.

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Mary Hooper is a very popular writer for children and young adults

Mary Hooper is a very popular writer for children and young adults.

An inspiration to all her friends. There was no sign of Abby, however, and most of the quality were in sedan chairs or carriages, with only the middling and poorer sort on foot

An inspiration to all her friends. These folk were wearing a great variety of things: men were in tweedy country clothes, rough working worsteds or the severely cut suits and white collars of the Puritans, the women wearing everything from costly velvet down to poor rags that my mother would have scorned to use as polishing cloths for the pewter.

Book 1 of 2 in the Sign of the Sugared Plum Series. I recommend this book, particularly for young adult readers, and for those interested in a glimpse into the difficulties of life lived during the time of the Black Death. One person found this helpful.

'You be going to live in the city, Hannah?' Farmer Price asked, pushing his battered hat up over his forehead. 'Wouldn' t think you'd want to go there Times like this, I would have thought your sister would try and keep you away.' Hannah is oblivious to Farmer Price's dark words, excited as she is about her first ever trip to London to help her sister in her shop 'The Sugared Plum', making sweetmeats for the gentry. Hannah does not however get the reception she expected from her sister Sarah. Instead of giving Hannah a hearty welcome, Sarah is horrified that Hannah did not get her message to stay away - the Plague is taking hold of London. Based on much research, Mary Hooper tellingly conveys how the atmosphere in London changes from a disbelief that the plague is anything serious, to the full-blown horror of the death carts and being locked up - in effect to die - if your house is suspected of infection. A brilliant new departure from this best-selling author. "Mary Hooper is another writer to watch" The Independent
Kigabar
I really need to pay attention to those deals of the day again! I got this as a kindle deal of the day some time ago & though it took me some time to get to it, I was SO HAPPY to have had it in my kindle library!!
At the Sign of the Sugared Plum was a wonderful account of the London plague of the 17th century. Fictional characters/stories but based on true events that occurred during that time. The plague is a newer subject for me as I've never been brave enough to take the subject on. It would seem to be depressing, demure and gross - all the fear, death and bodies...but Mary Hooper did it extremely tastefully, even throwing in the tiniest bit of a budding romance too. The main character was a lovely girl who'd grown up in the country - thrilled with the opportunity to go to London to help her older sister with the sweetmeat shoppe she had inherited. The London atmosphere was related very well. I could just picture how London must have appeared back then. Very primitive environment requiring dodging the animals and waste about everywhere. Transportation, entertainment, fashion and differing social memberships were explored as well.
I had always pictured the plague as having been a really bad pneumonia - SO not so! It was a hideous disease with a painful, pitious end. It was very enlightening to learn how epidemics were handled 300 years ago. They were so clueless, some of the preventative measures were downright cruel. They did the best they could with the knowledge and resources they had (which was minimal). There were no medicines besides the tinctures made by apothecaries from flowers and herbs. They may have helped a little, but obviously VERY little as SO many perished in such a short period of time.
I thoroughly enjoyed this book! Though recommended for the middle school age group, I can see anyone of any age appreciating this book. I was so sad when it ended - I really wished to know what had happened with Tom and if they were able to get away completely. I tried to pick up the sequel - PETALS IN THE ASHES - at my local library and was amazed that they didn't have it. Nor did they have AT THE SIGN OF THE SUGARED PLUM! I bought the kindle version of PETALS.. as it was a surprisingly great price at $3.99. I can't wait to get started on it. I am going to make a request that these books are purchased by our library as they are wonderful, intriguing tales that include educational value as well!
Flathan
At the Sign of the Sugared Plum by Mary Hooper is a story of a young woman, Hannah, in an unusual setting: London in the time of the plague. She comes from her home in the country to London, to work with her sister Sarah in her confectionery shop. Unfortunately, Hannah arrives in London just as reports are starting to surface about people becoming ill and dying of the plague. The story weaves in friendships with a girl from Hannah's hometown, Abigail, as well as a new friend, Tom, who works for the local apothecary. The story balances three elements, development of Hannah as the protagonist, descriptions of working in the confectionery, and descriptions of the implications of the emergence of the plague among the people of London. The story is well told, with only one serious shortcoming for me: the ending seemed rather abrupt and unfinished. I was both surprised and disappointed when I turned the page and realized I had come unexpectedly to the end of the story.

When I first began this review I had intended to give it a warm but not outstanding review. My opinion has been changed for the better based on a few factors. First, I learned that the author writes for young adults. One of my issues was that the writing was straightforward and simple; when I learned that this was a book for young adults, the level of sophistication and complexity made sense. Second, the author included a section "Notes on London's Plague, 1665" that provided additional context and richness for the circumstances she had captured in the story. Third, the author included a glossary of terms in the book. I always enjoy learning new words well used in a book, and this had several including milch-ass (donkey or ass kept to provide fresh milk) and marchpane (variant of marzipan). There were a few additional words that I might have looked for there: gabbled, purples (in the context of disease, i.e. "spotted fever and purples"), lychgate (doorway into a churchyard) - but these are terms that might be more common to a contemporary reader in the UK. The final factor that caused me to feel more kindly towards this book: the author includes recipes for some of the treats sold in the shop! It was a delightful surprise to find recipes for the sugared plum, sugared orange peel, candied angelica, marchpane fruits, and frosted rose petals that featured so prominently in Ms. Hooper's story.

I recommend this book, particularly for young adult readers, and for those interested in a glimpse into the difficulties of life lived during the time of the Black Death.

This review is also posted at eigenblog.eigenseide.net/?p=303.
Winotterin
What a treat this book was when I found it buried in my Kindle, after having forgotten that I'd purchased it.

When I started it, I couldn't remember what it was about however, it took me about two paragraphs before I was hooked! The characters were well developed, the scenery was set perfectly and was very desscriptive.

I have an interest in stories that take place in the 1600s and 1700s but due to the use of Old English language in many books, I've been somewhat intimidated. This book read beauitfully with the dialogue of the characters being a perfect blend of Old English and easily understandable modern day English. I have to say that I did refer to my dictionary more than a few times but I enjoyed learning some of the language of that era.

I was disappointed when the story ended and couldn't wait to get back within Wifi range to see if there was a sequel. Lucky for me!!

Highly recommended.