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Fiction
Author: Charles Dudley Warner
ISBN: 1406576727
Subcategory: Contemporary
Pages 236 pages
Publisher Dodo Press (March 21, 2008)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 578
ePUB size: 1337 kb
FB2 size: 1691 kb
DJVU size: 1419 kb
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eBook That Fortune (Dodo Press) download

by Charles Dudley Warner


Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900) was an American essayist and novelist.

Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900) was an American essayist and novelist.

Charles Dudley Warner (September 12, 1829 – October 20, 1900) was an American essayist, novelist, and friend of Mark Twain, with whom he co-authored the novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today. Warner was born of Puritan descent in Plainfield, Massachusetts. From the ages of six to fourteen he lived in Charlemont, Massachusetts, the place and time revisited in his book Being a Boy (1877). He then moved to Cazenovia, New York, and in 1851 graduated from Hamilton College in Clinton, New York.

Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900) was an American essayist and novelist

Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900) was an American essayist and novelist.

That Fortune - Charles Dudley Warner. Yet somehow the books that were still books had not been sent to the garret, to make room for the illustrated papers and the profound physiological studies of sin and suffering that were produced by touching a scientific button. The Project Gutenberg EBook of That Fortune, by Charles Dudley Warner. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with. No, the boy was conscious in a way of the mighty pulsation of American life, and he had also a dim notion that his dreams in his various worlds would come to a brilliant fulfillment when he was big enough to go out and win a name and fame.

Books related to That Fortune. Charles Dudley Warner. Summer In A Garden, And Calvin, A Study Of Character. Shakespeare's Background.

Third in a trilogy of novels exploring the creation and decline of a family fortune. The Gilded Age, Part 7. By Charles Dudley Warner. A Little Journey in the World. As We Go.

That Fortune book Warner travelled widely, lectured frequently, and was actively interested in prison reform, city park supervision, and other movements fo. . Charles Dudley Warner was an American essayist, novelist, and friend of Mark Twain, with whom he co-authored the novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today. Warner travelled widely, lectured frequently, and was actively interested in prison reform, city park supervision, and other movements for the public good.

Publisher: Dodo Press (February 22, 2008). very informative book. I liked the way the author wrote this books. It was a joy to read and more. One person found this helpful

Publisher: Dodo Press (February 22, 2008). ISBN-13: 978-1406576382. Product Dimensions: 6 x . x 9 inches. One person found this helpful.

There is more in Mr. Harrison's book and much of it is complex and contradictory. All of it to be treasured and digested as part of our American heritage.

A letter at the opening of a book may be only a footpath, leading the curious to a favorable point of observation, and then leaving them to wander as they will

A letter at the opening of a book may be only a footpath, leading the curious to a favorable point of observation, and then leaving them to wander as they will. Sluggards have been sent to the ant for wisdom; but writers might better be sent to the spider, not because he works all night, and watches all day, but because he works unconsciously. He dare not even bring his work before his own eyes, but keeps it behind him, as if too much knowledge of what one is doing would spoil the delicacy and modesty of one's work

Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900) was an American essayist and novelist. He worked with a surveying party in Missouri; studied law at the University of Pennsylvania; practiced in Chicago; was assistant editor (1860) and editor (1861-1867) of The Hartford Press, and after The Press was merged into The Hartford Courant, was co-editor with Joseph R Hawley; in 1884 he joined the editorial staff of Harper's Magazine, for which he conducted The Editors Drawer until 1892, when he took charge of The Editor's Study. He travelled widely, lectured frequently, and was actively interested in prison reform, city park supervision, and other movements for the public good. He was the first president of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. He first attracted attention by the reflective sketches entitled My Summer in a Garden (1870). Amongst his other works are Saunterings (1872), Backlog Studies (1873), Being a Boy (1878), In the Wilderness (1878), Captain John Smith (1881), Washington Irving (1881), A Little Journey in the World (1889), As We Were Saying (1891) and That Fortune (1899).