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eBook Summer Rain download
Fiction
Author: Jon Konrath
ISBN: 0595134947
Subcategory: Contemporary
Pages 660 pages
Publisher iUniverse (September 1, 2000)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 694
ePUB size: 1963 kb
FB2 size: 1612 kb
DJVU size: 1380 kb
Other formats: txt mbr lrf rtf

eBook Summer Rain download

by Jon Konrath


Jon Konrath has written and published a dozen or so books, including Summer Rain and Rumored to Exist.

Jon Konrath has written and published a dozen or so books, including Summer Rain and Rumored to Exist. com), and written for many other zines and publications. He is also an inventor, computer programmer, and amateur x-ray technician.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780595134946.

by Jon Konrath (Author). Being familiar with Konrath's writing, this book was really a surprise for me. It has nothing of the bizarro craziness that I've come to associate with Konrath. But, don't take that to mean that I didn't like the book. The reverse is actually the case. It just seems strange that it was written by the same author. Really, it demonstrates that Konrath has a much greater range than I'd previously understood. well written, emotional, character-driven realism. I've never seen Konrath do that before, but he does it well.

Jon Konrath is an absurdist writer and demolition derby enthusiast. 1 September ·. New post: kitchen, 30 years, mall dreams, algorithms. kitchen, 30 years, mall dreams, algorithms The Wrath of Kon Jon Konrath, Absurdist Writer. I'm in the middle of a kitchen remodel, allegedly halfway through with two weeks down, two to go, but you know how these things are.

John Conner has lost his girlfriend, his job, a scholarship, and has been kicked out of college. Instead of retreating back to his parents’ basement and a life of mediocrity and factory labor, he decides to stay the summer in the college town of Bloomington, Indiana.

Jon Konrath has written and published about ten books, including Summer Rain and Rumored to Exist. com), and has written for many other zines and publications.

John Conner has lost his girlfriend, his job, a scholarship, and has been kicked out of college. Instead of retreating back to his parents' basement and a life of mediocrity and factory labor, he decides to stay the summer in the college town of Bloomington, Indiana.

On the lazy Indiana University campus, Connor explores the worlds of death metal, zines, no-budget radio, and slackerdom while trying to learn about women, deal with depression, and get his life back on course. While he works telemarketing jobs and hawks glowsticks as a street vendor in order to survive, he learns who his friends are in the strange mix of people left at the college for the summer. The atmospheric and descriptive narration weaves the hidden beauty of the Midwest and the crossroads of the early Nineties into a timeless story of the follies of youth.

Conner's ramblings through the desolation of an empty campus parallel the meaningless jobs he must take to scrape by while he decides whether to remain sequestered in the relative comfort of college living or leap into an unstable world fueled only by his own creativity.

Camper
My first reaction to this book was, "650 pages to cover just one summer? I hope Konrath never writes a memoir!" I'm glad that first impressions weren't lasting, as the quasi-autobiographical novel really does not have much that could be cut out.

The story covers the summer of 1992 for John Conner, as he struggles with a painful breakup, the possibility of failing out of school, perpetual money troubles, and the challenges of picking up women via computer 10 years before it becomes trendy. Top it off with a diagnosed case of bipolar disorder, and you have a trying summer.

Although it helps to have lived in Bloomington to appreciate the precision of Konrath's descriptions, the book's deeper messages of alienation, struggle and coping with change make it appropriate for broader audiences.
Oghmaghma
Summer Rain is the obsessively detailed, fictional memoir of a type I bipolar living out a penniless summer in Bloomington, Indiana. The action takes place in the late pre-Internet era, probably a year away from the advent of Mosaic/Netscape Navigator, and much of the narrative sweep has to do with computers and early networking. John Conner, the narrator, lives mostly in his boiling imagination, creating a world of his own out of chaotic death metal, bottom-feeder jobs and meticulously described fast-food meals (you can feel the protagonist's hunger--will this be my last scrap of food until payday?). He yearns for the One True Love that he is certain exists somewhere. She does, but only in his fevered, pharmaceutically fueled dreams, tantalizingly out of reach. The most interesting parts of the novel are when Conner goes off the deep end of either depression or mania--shoved there by the girls who initially want him, then send him packing when they become overwhelmed by his intensity. This happens enough to keep the book percolating until it simmers to a close.
Beanisend
When I was in college, one of the big important books you were supposed to read was Coupland's _Generation X_. But the big secret was that I was never able to finish it; this was a source of guilt for years, until I came to terms with the fact that this book and this buzzword simply did not speak for me. Back then I'd found even the 80s minimalists more engaging. Well now this generation has come of age and grown and this book documents that sliver of time in the early 1990s when everything was so ripe and promising with the golden hue of youth. Who would be first to write about those early days of TCP/IP computer networks, university Internet access and Usenet that we all learned and lived through in college? Jon Konrath. He was there and that's what he wrote about in this first book of his, a big thick novel about heavy metal college radio and midwestern campus life at its Nineties slacker apex. It's honest, evocative, and funny as hell at times. You should buy it now in this first edition and greet him in the beginning of what is sure to be a long career.
Phalaken
VAX, drugs, and rock n roll: John Conner's metaphorical rainy world of terror is rampant with uncooperative co-eds, cheap alcohol, bad food and death metal. Ever wondered what it's like to be stuck in a college town when there's barely a college in session? "Summer Rain" is a darkly humorous depiction of two long months in Bloomington, Indiana.