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eBook Life Goes to the Movies download
Fiction
Author: Peter Selgin
ISBN: 0979312388
Subcategory: Contemporary
Pages 206 pages
Publisher Dzanc Books (May 1, 2009)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 419
ePUB size: 1692 kb
FB2 size: 1661 kb
DJVU size: 1369 kb
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eBook Life Goes to the Movies download

by Peter Selgin


1334 Woodbourne Street. The characters and events in this book are fictitious.

1334 Woodbourne Street. No part of this book may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher. Published 2011 by Dzanc Books. A Dzanc Books rEprint Series Selection. eBooksISBN-13: 978-1-936873-84-5. Printed in the United States of America.

Peter Selgin's short story collection Drowning Lessons won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. Wonderfully innovative and elegantly crafted, Life Goes to the Movies brims with exuberance and wit. He's also published book-length nonfiction and an award-winning children's book. Both a celebrationand something of an elegy for the golden age of Hollywood, this novel reeled me in with its propulsive energy and won me over before I had finished chaper on. - Frederick Reiken, author of The.

Peter Selgin's short story collection, Drowning Lessons, won the Flannery O'Connor Short Fiction Award. Full of surprises, it's also a wonderful look back to the 1970s. In addition, "Life Goes To The Movies" caught me flat-footed with its grittiness, several times knocking me flat. He's also published booklength non-fiction and an award winning children's book. I love Selgin's writing book, "By Craft and By Cunning" and was curious to see if his novel practiced what he teaches so well. Selgin is a master of dialogue.

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Peter Selgin rick buildings perched on a grassy.

Peter Selgin rick buildings perched on a grassy acropolis overlooking the wide, silent Hudson River. Burn in: April, 1984. At first they don’t notice the walls, then they’re everywhere: walls of stone, brick, metal and cinderblock, some crowned with razor wire, others spangled with institutional ivy. Surrounding them. Are they to keep crazy folk in or sane people out?. Margot Livesey, author of The House on Fortune Street With Life Goes to the Movies, Peter Selgin aims far higher than most of us poor storytellers ever dare. From beginning to end, Ikept imagining the funnels of smoke that surely must have risen from his keyboard as he wrote this potent, superbly crafted, and wonderfully ambitious novel. - Donald Ray Pollock, author of Knockemstiff.

Dzanc Books, 2009 Finalist: AWP Award Series for the Novel Finalist .

Dzanc Books, 2009 Finalist: AWP Award Series for the Novel Finalist: James Jones First Novel Fellowship.

Find sources: "Peter Selgin" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (October 2017) (Learn how .

Find sources: "Peter Selgin" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (October 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. 4) His first novel, Life Goes to the Movies was a finalist for both the James Jones First Novel Fellowship and the Association of Writers & Writing Programs Award for the Novel and was published in 2009 by Dzanc Books.

A tour de force, Life Goes to the Movies is the love story of two straight men: a dark devil of a Vietnam, and the naive Italian American innocent who follows him to the edge of madness and beyond. Funny, engaging, and entertaining, this is just a great story told well. Peter Selgin's short story collection Drowning Lessons won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction.

Funny, engaging, and entertaining, this is just a great story told well.

A tour de force, "Life Goes to the Movies" is the love story of two straight men: a dark devil of a Vietnam, and the naive Italian American innocent who follows him to the edge of madness and beyond.

A tour de force, Life Goes to the Movies is the love story of two straight men: a dark devil of a Vietnam vet-turned-filmmaker, and the naive Italian American innocent who follows him to the edge of madness and beyond. Funny, engaging, and entertaining, this is just a great story told well.

Peter Selgin's short story collection Drowning Lessons won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. He's also published book-length nonfiction and an award-winning children's book. He's the fiction editor of Alimentum: The Literature of Food.

"Wonderfully innovative and elegantly crafted, Life Goes to the Movies brims with exuberance and wit.  Both a celebrationand something of an elegy for the golden age of Hollywood, this novel reeled me in with its propulsive energy and won me over before I had finished chaper one."

-- Frederick Reiken, author of The Lost Legends of New Jersey

"Life Goes to the Movies is the irresistable account of a passionate friendship between two young men, both star-struck by art.  Selgin's vivid account of New York in the 1970s, his richly complex characters, his encyclopedic knowledge of film and his sense of how small the gap is between good luck and bad make this an utterly absorbing novel.  A wonderful read."

-- Margot Livesey, author of The House on Fortune Street

"With Life Goes to the Movies, Peter Selgin aims far higher than most of us poor storytellers ever dare.  From beginning to end, Ikept imagining the funnels of smoke that surely must have risen from his keyboard as he wrote this potent, superbly crafted, and wonderfully ambitious novel."

-- Donald Ray Pollock, author of Knockemstiff

saafari
An unusual story about two non conformists. Shades of Midnight Cowboy (though not nearly as well told) and echoes of Carl Hiaasen
It works as a character study though they are not fully realized characters
Small Black
One way to think of the last half-century in this country is as "the Scorsese Era." The filmmaker, offspring of immigrants & old urban tribes, came up w/ conflicts & images that expressed core elements of the years' changes. That's the kind of sweep & insight Peter Selgin's coast-to-coast-&-back-again buddy novel, a perpetual wannabe's heartbroke view of the same decades. Heartbroke -- but jocular, I rush to add. Much of the way LIFE GOES TO THE MOVIES revels in a cheerful but dream-full poverty, à la Dean & Sal in ON THE ROAD, though the action's transposed to the 1970s & after. The central twosome here are Nigel DePoli (a son of NYC-area Italian newcomers, like Scorsese) & Dwaine Fitzgibbon (though the spelling of the name & a number of other elements of his background remain in question). The latter's the dreamer who matters, a would-be auteur. Dwaine's an art-school dropout, early Scorsese fanatic, & a Vietnam vet. On that last point, Dwaine (or rather, his skillful creator) remains mysterious, doling out the facts of his service just enough to keep Nigel tantalized -- Nigel & occasional others, including a sort-of girlfriend to both. They all start out living on nothing & yet somehow cobbling together experimental late-'70s films in the streets of lower Manhattan. A couple of those sound splendidly bloody & crazy, by the way... But before long, to be sure, that dream collapses, & Nigel & Dwaine suffer their first separation. After that, LIFE GOES really *goes,* as Nigel & Dwaine scrounge up new movie ideas & then bicker them away, all while rolling hither & yon around the US -- Hollywood, Florida, & elsewhere, & I do struggle w/ a problem or two in what film-folks call "continuity" -- but nonetheless the creative spurts & fizzles, even when they drift into madness, are always alive w/ a Kerouackian itchy-footedness that, true to form, is less about getting anywhere than about the intersections w/ ecstasy. Such encounters are brief, inevitably, no longer even than the transcendent moment in a Scorsese movie. Brief, & yet impossible to shake.
Molotok
We were blackening pages, all of us, covering them with charcoal, leaving no traces of white showing, turning us black as Con Edison smoke, as abandoned subway station platforms and third rail rats. As black as the vacuum-packed blackness between stars.

So begins this love story, told by Nigel DePoli, an American-Italian art student desperate to escape (or at least ignore) his immigrant background, about his friendship with Dwaine Fitzgibbon (‘That’s D for Death, W for War, A for Anarchy, I for Insane, N for nightmare, and E for the End of the World’). A Vietnam vet, Dwaine pulls Nigel into his dreams of making movies and living life. These dreams become nightmares as Dwaine descends into madness and Nigel must decide whether he will follow his friend’s path or his own.

LIFE GOES TO THE MOVIES (Peter Selgin, DZANC Books) is one of the rare books that make me Pavlovian-giddy before I even crack the spine to return where I left off. And if it weren’t for that nuisance called life, I would have finished the story in one fell swoop, the novel is that good.

Perhaps my enthusiasm is biased; I adore stories about young mad men with artistic bents. Perhaps it’s the book’s upclose examination of an unexamined phenomenon – the friendship of two men that has homoerotic overtones but is not homosexual. Perhaps it’s the passion Dwaine and, later, Nigel, bring to their lives. Perhaps the book wows me because of all the pretty film frames. But maybe, just maybe, it’s all about the writing. Phenomenal. Like here:

Gulls wheel under a dome of powder blue sky. Dwaine hacks city smog and cigarette smoke from his lungs. Strands of seaweed cling to our tuxedoes. The morning sun invests everything with a lemony, prehistoric glow, the kind of light that I picture dinosaurs trouncing through.

And here:

I sat there watching the candle flame flicker, wondering: what happened to me, to my life? Where was it? Where had it gone? Plummeting back to earth, wings singed off, crashed into the ocean: that’s what happens when you fly too close to the sun.

I'm always a sucker for an Icarus allusion, but this line serves as the novel's fundamental: choosing to live in the glare of a charismatic other or making your own light. Nigel’s transformation from a gullible, beige being to his own person is the strand underlying this story, juxtaposed against the seeming unraveling of Dwaine’s life. Or is it unraveling? The novel prods against what it means to be insane, and insinutes perhaps there are gifts found in madness.

I finished the book 30,000 feet over the eastern seaboard, sobbing into my cocktail napkin, alarming the suduko-playing woman beside me. I didn’t want the adventures of these two wondrous characters to end – so I started in again.

LIFE GOES TO THE MOVIES is exuberant, lush, poignant, and funny and sad as hell. Please, read it…

About the Author: This may be Peter Selgin's first novel, but it’s not his first book. Drowning Lessons (University of Georgia Press, 2008), his first book of short stories, won the Flannery O’Connor Award. He also is the author of By Cunning and Craft: Sound Advice and Practical Wisdom for Fiction Writers (Writers Digest Books). LIFE GOES TO THE MOVIES has an autobiographical edge: read this interview of Selgin in Pif Magazine, then visit his blog Dreaming on Paper .

About the Press: DZANC Books is the good doobie press of the indies. Besides having a stand-up portfolio of literary fiction, short story collections, and poetry manuscripts, the press sponsors the DZANC Prize for excellence in literary fiction and community service, and sponsors a literacy program for young people in Michigan. They’ve just sprouted a new literary magazine - The Collagist - and Dan Wickett is the proud papa of the Emerging Writers Network. Some may say the small press is dead; DZANC Books throws that convention on its head.

About the Bookstore: This copy bought at Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, the best independent bookstore ever. Period. Right around the corner? Grolier, the best poetry-only store.
ndup
If you haven't yet found Peter Selgin, do yourself a favor and read his cannot-put-down novel that actually does justice to the 70s. This is a voice that captivates, and if David Foster Wallace were around for this one, he'd be incredibly jealous. Not only is this book a wonderful ride, it has wisdom and fierce compassion to spare. In fact, Selgin's novel has everything I look for in fiction and easily sends other, less engaging "best sellers" flying against the wall. Really, treat yourself!
fightnight
If the world were a better place - okay, I'll settle for a world of better readers - Peter Selgin's novel. "Life Goes To The Movies" would sell five million copies. This is gorgeous. A fast-moving page-turner; literary writing that both inspires and speaks eloquently to the reader. It's the story of an impossible friendship born between two men from opposite paths who share one thing: a love for movies. The book is witty, entertaining, and clips along at a breezy pace. Full of surprises, it's also a wonderful look back to the 1970s. In addition, "Life Goes To The Movies" caught me flat-footed with its grittiness, several times knocking me flat. The combo of literary writing/plus action reminded me of another favorite author, Peter Dexter. I love Selgin's writing book, "By Craft and By Cunning" and was curious to see if his novel practiced what he teaches so well. It does. Selgin is a master of dialogue. This is a masterful novel. I highly recommend it to anyone who is tired of industrial "bestsellers" and enjoys fresh, spectacular story-telling.