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eBook Whitethorn (MP3) download
Fiction
Author: Bryce Courtenay
ISBN: 1740949714
Subcategory: Contemporary
Publisher Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd (January 12, 2005)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 621
ePUB size: 1577 kb
FB2 size: 1886 kb
DJVU size: 1414 kb
Other formats: lit lrf azw txt

eBook Whitethorn (MP3) download

by Bryce Courtenay


Whitethorn MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged. After looking at the Bryce Courtenay web site and reading the bio material included there, it is pretty obvious that this book is largely autobiographical.

Whitethorn MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged. by. Bryce Courtenay (Author). Courtenay was born in South Africa, was raised in an orphanage, and immigrated to Australia with his first wife who was Australian. I found the characters in the book to be well developed and believable and feel that Courtenay did a good job of walking the thin line between telling it like it was and being judgmental. There is a Zulu hero but also Afrikaners who are likable, descent people.

A Recipe for Dreaming is a little treasure of wise words and beautiful images. With insight, humour and a deep sense of humanity, Bryce Courtenay inspires us to become dreamers and questioners, creators of lives that are rich and rewarding. Illuminating th. Smoky Joe's Cafe.

From Bryce Courtenay comes a new novel about Africa. And so begin some of life's tougher lessons for the small lonely boy. Like the whitethorn, one of Africa's most enduring plants, Tom learns how to survive in the harsh climate of racial hatred

From Bryce Courtenay comes a new novel about Africa. White South Africa is a deeply divided nation with many of the Afrikaner people frantically opposed to the English. The world is also on the brink of war and South Africa elects to fight for the Allied cause against Germany. Like the whitethorn, one of Africa's most enduring plants, Tom learns how to survive in the harsh climate of racial hatred. Then a terrible event sends him on a journey to ensure that justice is done. On the way, his most unexpected discovery is love.

Whitethorn by Bryce Courtenay (2006, MP3 CD, Unabridged) Novel of 1939 Africa.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches.

White South Africa is a deeply divided nation with many of the Afrikaner people fanatically opposed to the English.

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I thoroughly enjoy Courtenay's books. Whitethorn was excellent, as usual. As usual an excellent book by Bryce Courtenay. Mr. Courtenay has a way of getting into a child's head and putting that child's feelings, hurts and joys on paper. He brought the apartheid issues to life in the form of his characters. Sometimes you laugh out loud and sometimes you just want to slap the adult that has mistreated the child as so many adults did to Jack Fitzsaxby in this book. But most of his child characters go on to become adults that have beat the odds and that is something I enjoy so much about his books.

So much so that she was allowed to go everywhere with me, and both Meneer Prinsloo and Frikkie Botha would boast about her to people who visited The Boys Farm.

So much so that she was allowed to go everywhere with me, and both Meneer Prinsloo and Frikkie Botha would boast about her to people who visited The Boys Farm ride than the shiny-feathered, crust-eating Black Orpingtons because Tinker had never won a ribbon at an agricultural show or anything like that. But Meneer Prinsloo kept a tally of the rats she’d caught and he’d say to visitors, ‘See that little dog, so far he’s caught 120 rats. He never did understand that Tinker was a she, because you had to be a he to have done something.

Arthur Bryce Courtenay, AM (14 August 1933 – 22 November 2012) was a South African/Australian advertising director and novelist

Arthur Bryce Courtenay, AM (14 August 1933 – 22 November 2012) was a South African/Australian advertising director and novelist. He is one of Australia's best-selling authors, notable for his book The Power of One. Arthur Bryce Courtenay was born in the Lebombo Mountains, South Africa, the son of Maude Greer and Arthur Ryder. Ryder was married with six children, and lived with his family, but also maintained a relationship with Greer, with whom he already had a daughter, Rosemary

In this sweeping novel of Africa, in all its power, beauty and savagery, Bryce Courtenay captures the life of a child and the life of a nation. Whitethorn is a book about tragedy and joy, about love and hatred, and about a boy called Tom who will not rest until justice is done. From the author of Brother Fish and The Power of One comes another moving story you won't forget.
Lcena
Let me start by saying this is a great coming of age story about a young boy Tom Fitzsaxby growing up during the 40's and 50's in South Africa. The writing style is written as if Tom is more of an observer of his life than a participant in it. This gives the book an unusual tone that is well both told and absorbing.

By why the three stars then?

Point One;

Well 'haven't I read this before?'. Why yes. In the 'Power of One' also by Bryce Courtenay.

The similarities; Young boy of English descent growing up in South Africa - raised in an orphanage/ boarding school - persecuted by Afrikaner children - loner - scenes of urination (!) - makes friends with understanding adults who mentor him - brilliant student rises above it all - boxing - works in Rhodesian mines (I nearly gave up then and there) - meets school boy tormentor - some sort of resolution - goes to English University - becomes a lawyer (okay that's in Tandia the follow up to Power of One) - fights for the rights of blacks.

Point Two;

Initially there seems to be no narrative drive, that is to say it is unclear exactly where the story is going. It meanders along telling stories about our protagonist's youth but it's unclear where all this is leading. It becomes apparent in the last third though. Secondly, the book seems to 'hurry' towards a conclusion. I have come across this before in other books by Mr Courtenay. Where after a prolonged build up, the resolution comes all too quickly considering the narrative tone preceding this point.

These criticisms shouldn't take away from the fact that this is a well written book that is an enjoyable read. It immerses you in South African life of that period and the people and attitudes of the time.

So 4/5 if you haven't read 'Power of One'
Ranenast
This was my first Bryce Courtenay novel.

I had tried to find his books for the kindle while we were sailing around Australia last year but for some reason the kindle versions did not show up when I searched. Ironically it turned out that leaving "kindle" out of the search phrase allowed me to see the kindle versions but if I used the word "kindle" I only got drops for the paper and audio versions of his books.

The reason I have started with this book is because we had arrived in South Africa by the time I had figured out how to find the kindle versions of his books on Amazon. "Whitethorn" was highly recommended by a friend here at the Zululand Yacht Club who was helping me understand Apartheid and its aftermath in this troubled country.

After looking at the Bryce Courtenay web site and reading the bio material included there, it is pretty obvious that this book is largely autobiographical. Courtenay was born in South Africa, was raised in an orphanage, and immigrated to Australia with his first wife who was Australian.

I found the characters in the book to be well developed and believable and feel that Courtenay did a good job of walking the thin line between telling it like it was and being judgmental. There is a Zulu hero but also Afrikaners who are likable, descent people. The book treats the complex problem of racial prejudice and sexual predation with the shades of gray that are appropriate and leaves the reader understanding how complex these problems are and what a barrier they are to South Africa's evolution into a full fledged member of the nations in the 21st century.

At the time I am writing this review I am 3/4 of the way through "The Potato Factory" which is turning out to be another fine novel by an author who deserves more attention that he seems to have gotten with US audiences.

Courtenay was a good craftsman who wrote very readable books. I am hopeful that the rest of his works will be as satisfying to read as this book was.
Mightdragon
I have to preface this by saying I LOVE Bryce Courtenay's body of work. I have read 90% of his books and even picked up some of them while I was in Australia - devastated that I missed his book signing by one day. I have written to him and received a reply. Power of One is my favorite book of all time.

That said, I was thrilled to find another big book available from Mr. Courtenay. I bought it as a summer read to make my travels even more interesting.

I was so caught by the similarities in the beginning. To add to the first list of similiarites - PK had a chicken - Tom has a dog (both well trained amazingly). There are still chickens in the story.

Bad nicknames (Pisskop for Peekay) and get away mongrel dog for Tom. Miss Philips is the professor.

I am not quite done with the book and checked this out to see what everyone else thought of such a similar book coming from such an extraordinary author that surely this was not something he needed to fall back on??

To hear there are Rhodesian mines in this book, etc., is disappointing.

This does not take away from my love of Power of One or of Mr. Courtenay's writing. But what was the publisher and author thinking?

Again if you haven't read Power of One you will love this book. But those of us in love with the characters in Power of One will resent their dilution by such similar characters.

As I mentioned, I am not finished yet so I wonder - is there a big huge woman in this book? There usually is in all of his books - not just the Power of One series.

Regretfully signed,
Judy Hervall