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Fiction
Author: Thisbe Nissen
ISBN: 0099422727
Subcategory: Contemporary
Pages 290 pages
Publisher Anchor Books; New Ed edition (2002)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 241
ePUB size: 1338 kb
FB2 size: 1162 kb
DJVU size: 1112 kb
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eBook The Good People of New York download

by Thisbe Nissen


So begins Thisbe Nissen’s breathtaking debut novel.

So begins Thisbe Nissen’s breathtaking debut novel. The novel begins with Roz Rosenzweig, a snarky and cynical New York Jewish woman, crawling on her hands and knees outside of her friend's apartment for a key in the bushes, where she meets her future husband, the Nebraska-born Edwin Anderson. Roz is no-nonsense and doesn't take anything too seriously, including, at first, Edwin.

Thisbe Nissen is a graduate of Oberlin College and The Iowa Writers' Workshop, and is a former James Michener Fellow. Out of the Girls' Room and Into the Night, her first published book, won the 1999 John Simmons Short Fiction Award. A native New Yorker, she now lives in Iowa. Библиографические данные. The Good People Of New York.

Start by marking The Good People of New York as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Good People of New York as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. So begins Thisbe Nissen’s breathtaking debut novel, a decidedly urban fairy tale that follows Roz and Edwin as they move from improbable courtship to marriage to the birth of daughter Miranda When Roz Rosenzweig meets Edwin Anderson fumbling for keys on the stoop of a Manhattan walk-up, the last thing on her mind is falling for a polite Nebraskan–yet fall. This was definitely one of those books that lies on your shelf until you almost give it away, then when you take the time to read it, it surprises the heck out of you.

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New York novel? How might a non-New Yorker and a New Yorker read this book differently? . 10. The imagery of motion permeates The Good People of New York

New York novel? How might a non-New Yorker and a New Yorker read this book differently? 7. For which character do you feel the most sympathy? Which characters do not evoke as much compassion and why? . The imagery of motion permeates The Good People of New York. For example, Roz imagines her courtship with Edwin in terms of arriving at a destination and establishing roots and Miranda associates the paths her parents’ lives have taken with driving. What mood do these travel images and metaphors create? What do they convey about life in New York City?

A Conversation with Thisbe Nissen author of The Good People of New York. Thisbe Nissen was on tour for the hardcover publication of The Good People of New York during the summer of 2001

A Conversation with Thisbe Nissen author of The Good People of New York. Q. What made you want to write this book and how did you begin to formulate the story? A. I first wrote the story "The Rather Unlikely Courtship of Edwin Anderson and Roz Rosenzweig" in an attempt to chronicle a somewhat fictionalized version of my parents’ courtship. Thisbe Nissen was on tour for the hardcover publication of The Good People of New York during the summer of 2001. For her author’s desktop she kept a day-by-day tour diary on the road.

So begins Thisbe Nissen s breathtaking debut novel, a. .That could have been the ad that resulted in the pairing of New Yorker Roz Rosenzweig and Edwin Anderson - and the result is this marvel of a book by Thisbe Nissen

So begins Thisbe Nissen s breathtaking debut novel, a decidedly urban fairy tale that follows Roz and Edwin as they move from improbable courtship to marriage to the birth of daughter Miranda the locus of all Roz s attention, anxiety, and often smothering affection. That could have been the ad that resulted in the pairing of New Yorker Roz Rosenzweig and Edwin Anderson - and the result is this marvel of a book by Thisbe Nissen. From the first page, I was smitten with the couple and the writing, which is as smart, sassy, funny and quick-paced as New York itself.

Автор: Nissen, Thisbe Название: The Good People of New York Издательство: Random House .

So begins Thisbe Nissens breathtaking debut novel, a decidedly urban fairy tale that follows Roz and Edwin as they move from improbable courtship to marriage to the birth of daughter Miranda-the locus of all Rozs attention, anxiety, and often smothering affection.

Thisbe Nissen is an American author. Originally from New York City, she lived in Iowa for eleven years. Among her works are Osprey Island, The Good People of New York, and Out of the Girls' Room and into the Night. She has taught a fiction course at least once a year since the inception of the Iowa Young Writers' Workshop, a two-week intensive creative writing workshop "camp" for talented high school students, except in 2006. She has also taught at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Iowa Elderhostel.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. From a thrillingly talented 28-year-old newcomer - the Anne Tyler for a new generation, yet with a distinctive voice and quirky sensibility all of her own - comes a contemporary novel that brings to life a few o. From a thrillingly talented 28-year-old newcomer - the Anne Tyler for a new generation, yet with a distinctive voice and quirky sensibility all of her own - comes a contemporary novel that brings to life a few of the 'good people of New York' and renders them in all their neurotic glory. When Roz Rosenzweig, self-described spitfire and loud n' proud New York Jew, meets Edwin Anderson at a party in the 1970s in her friend's Manhatten apartment, she has trouble believing that the earnest and soft-spoken Nebraskan is for real

Fordg
I ordered this book based on reviews of excellence. Perhaps someone was reading a different book than I. I do NOT recommend this book. This book touched on very difficult subjects and then just left them unexplored such as a student dating her high school teacher, and many more touchy subjects. Are the rest of the authors book like this? If so I am staying away from them also. I can't wait to sell this at auction.
Arashilkis
**Includes Spoilers**

This was definitely one of those books that lies on your shelf until you almost give it away, then when you take the time to read it, it surprises the heck out of you.

The novel begins with Roz Rosenzweig, a snarky and cynical New York Jewish woman, crawling on her hands and knees outside of her friend's apartment for a key in the bushes, where she meets her future husband, the Nebraska-born Edwin Anderson. Roz is no-nonsense and doesn't take anything too seriously, including, at first, Edwin. But Edwin's quiet sincerity wins her over, and they soon marry, much to the humorous chagrin of Roz's mother Adele (which culminates in a hilarious meeting between Adele and Edwin at a kosher deli). After having an awkward conversation with Gert, one of Edwin's many young alphabetized nieces/nephews, Roz has the sudden realization that she wants a child.

Miranda Gert Anderon becomes the center of Roz's life, surpassing everything and everyone else in importance. In a pivotal scene while Roz is on a skiing vacation with Edwin, she realizes that all she wants is to be with her baby girl, who is at home with the sitter. Nothing, not the free time with her husband, not the cute ski instructor, can change that. This is when we really see into Roz for the first time- she has something that will always be hers, that will always be there. And she loves her unconditionally. This intense love for Miranda overshadows her love and need for Edwin, and their marriage dissolves, Edwin moving back to Nebraska.

As Miranda grows up, the novel begins to center more around her, which disappointed me a little, because Roz is a really interesting and multi-dimensional character. Miranda is popular and outgoing, born to be a stage actress, and her maturity is something that her mother and father deal with in different ways. Roz is a very attentive but not overly worried mother. She always wants to know where her daughter is, but doesn't flip out over a joint or a beer. Miranda isn't a character I loved, mostly because she has a long line of tragic and pretentious love stories (the older high school boy when she was TWELVE, her pseudo step-brother, her ex-teacher) and she's mean to her mom. But I can't fault her for that, because she was written as a realistic high school girl who loves her mom but cannot comprehend her mother's deep, smothering love for her. They do not have a Gilmore Girls relationship, but the way they interact is in no way strained. This is he first novel I've read to portray a real, true, enviable relationship between a mother and her daughter. No matter who comes in and out of their lives- the SS, their hippy boarder Wing, Miranda's best friend Darrin from Denver- they always have each other.

This is a great book club read. It is fast, has interesting and believable characters, and it is suprisingly funny. I'd love my mom to read this and tell me what she thinks- it truly is a love story, but not a romance. It is a love story between a mother and daughter.
CrazyDemon
Others have posted well-written reviews outlining the weaknesses of this novel so I will be brief.
The two initial characters in this book, Riz and Edwin, were well-characterized and had a world of potential as lead characters. By writing Edwin (most interesting/conflicted character imo) out, and then focussing mainly on their child-a character with little self-reflection, the story became superficial. Too bad, because the adult characters had very interesting lives that I would have liked to examine more closely.
Disappointing.
Nicanagy
Nissen's minimalist writing technique and the steady evolution of the book from the point of view of Edwin Anderson, Nebraska lawyer in the big city to his first wife, Roz Rosenzweig, New York Jew, and finally to their daughter Miranda, seems to have confused some reviewers, but it captivated this one.

The book is meant to make you supply the gaps between the stories and the points of view with your own thoughts and conjectures. Roz and Edwin meet cute, marry cute, become fish out of water in each's milieu, conceive Miranda and try to raise her in the big city. Edwin's disappointment with his own career choices eventually break up the marriage, around the time Miranda is first starting at a ritzy summer camp, and Miranda becomes a precocious latchkey kid. We follow her first three romances, one with a boy at camp, one with the son of her orthodontist, who breaks Roz's heart a second time, and finally with her English teacher in her senior year. And finally we end with her in college in Brown, her mother happy with a man she met at the library and her friend Darrin living in New York watching over them.

I don't see Nissen as having some great literary point here, but rather exploring issues about love and marriage and growing up, both by children and adults, in an indirect and wonderfully written way. The book in may ways gives you what you bring to it, requiring the reader to supply his or her own thoughts and experiences to understand its themes. It is an easy book to read and a difficult book to understand. I enjoyed it immensely.
CopamHuk
I don't know why, but the Iowa Writers' Workshop produces some of the best writing in America, and as far as style goes, Thisbe Nissen is no exception. Her phrasing is beautiful--a memory that aches like a death, for instance. Her dialogue is good. Where the novel falls down is the story and characters, about two-thirds of the way through. The book simply goes nowhere. Characters who start out being major players drop out and either are never heard of again or briefly described in an irrelevant incident. I thought Edwin was a leading role, it seems all he was there for was to be the father of Miranda. Roz could have gone to a sperm bank. What happened to good friend Fran who was so close to Miranda and at whose party Roz met Edwin? She just disappears. What is the point of that Christmas scene in Nebraska where we get the life story of Kathy and Duane, Shauna and Rod, little Brittney and all the others? To show the contrast with Manhattan? What happens to little Gert, who makes such an impression on Roz, she names her daughter after her? What happens to Miranda's budding acting career? Roz is a lawyer in an interesting field, but we never hear about her work or her clients or her friends. This is one of those books where I finish the last page and ask myself what this was supposed to say to me.