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eBook My Lady of Cleves download
Fiction
Author: Margaret C. Barnes
ISBN: 0441552013
Subcategory: Contemporary
Publisher Ace Books (September 1, 1982)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 640
ePUB size: 1336 kb
FB2 size: 1377 kb
DJVU size: 1860 kb
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eBook My Lady of Cleves download

by Margaret C. Barnes


Written by world-renowned historical novelist Margaret Campbell Barnes, My Lady of Cleves gives readers an intimate portrait of the warm, unpretentious princess who never expected to become Queen of England and how she navigated a world of high drama and courtly elegance.

Written by world-renowned historical novelist Margaret Campbell Barnes, My Lady of Cleves gives readers an intimate portrait of the warm, unpretentious princess who never expected to become Queen of England and how she navigated a world of high drama and courtly elegance

My Lady of Cleves' reveals the mesmerizing story of Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII's fourth wife, one of the rare . Margaret Campbell Barnes made me care about the people I was reading about and left me wanting more of their story.

My Lady of Cleves' reveals the mesmerizing story of Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII's fourth wife, one of the rare women who matched wits successfully with the fiery king and lived to tell the tale. Alabama Book Worm, "I really liked My Lady of Cleves ; it was well-written, fast-paced and very enjoyable. I would recommend it to any fans of historical fiction; it is well worth reading this novel on an underappreciated queen.

My Lady of Cleves book. Written by world-reknowned historical novelist Margaret Campbell Barnes, My Lady of Cleves gives readers an intimate portrait of the warm, unpretentious princess who never expected to become Queen of England.

My Lady of Cleves by Margaret Campbell Barnes is a wonderful historical novel that highlights the life of a very virtuous and kind woman who was horribly mistreated and still retained her self respect

My Lady of Cleves by Margaret Campbell Barnes is a wonderful historical novel that highlights the life of a very virtuous and kind woman who was horribly mistreated and still retained her self respect. I was impressed with Anne of Cleves and with the way her story was told by Ms. Barnes. Romance Reader at Heart. Margaret Campbell Barnes' My Lady of Cleves would make an excellent selection as well. It's a novel that stood the test of time. Rich in history it gives the.

Written by world-renowned historical novelist Margaret Campbell Barnes, My Lady of Cleves gives readers an intimate portrait of the warm, unpretentious princess who never expected to become Queen of England. Knowing the king's ravenous desire for a son, and aware of the disastrous consequences of not bearing an heir, Anne of Cleves bravely took on the duty of weathering the Tudor King's temper, whims, arrogance, and irresponsible passions – and won the hearts of his subjects in the process.

Mobile version (beta). My Lady of Cleves: A Novel of Henry VIII and Anne of Cleves. Margaret Campbell Barnes. Download (pdf, . 8 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

by. Barnes, Margaret Campbell, 1891-1961. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station15. cebu on April 1, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Margaret Campbell Barnes. Are you so frightened of her?. Anne asked compassionately. So dependent on her, explained the girl, with a gamin pout which, in spite of her obvious breeding, savored of the backstairs y father was only a younger. So dependent on her, explained the girl, with a gamin pout which, in spite of her obvious breeding, savored of the backstairs y father was only a younger son and my mother died. Unimportant as she was, she knew quite well why her family wanted this new queen out of the way; but they were wrong about her being a boorish, strait-laced Lutheran. Katherine heard the Duchess’s strident voice calling to her from the end of the gallery; but there was something she had to say. Madam, don’t let them make.

My Lady of Cleves tells the mesmerizing story of Anne of Cleves, fourth wife of Henry VIII, one of the rare women who matched wits successfully with the fiery king . My Lady of Cleves - Margaret Campbell Barnes.

My Lady of Cleves tells the mesmerizing story of Anne of Cleves, fourth wife of Henry VIII, one of the rare women who matched wits successfully with the fiery king and lived to tell the tale. Aware of the disastrous consequences of not bearing an heir, Anne of Cleves bravely took on the duty of weathering the Tudor King's temper and won the hearts of his subjects in the process.

Электронная книга "My Lady of Cleves", Margaret Campbell Barnes

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Malhala
When I bought this book I didn't realize it was written in 1946 (it was reprinted in 2008) and wondered if it might seem dated - I know, that sounds odd considering the time period it's covering. Anyway, I'm nearly finished and have thoroughly enjoyed it. I've read many historical novels and non-fiction accounts of this time period and this ranks up there with the more enjoyable reads. It also adds a slightly different twist than some of the other novels about Anne of Cleves so it doesn't just seem like a repeat of something you may have already read.
Goll
I really enjoyed this book! We know so little about this fourth wife of Henry VIII compared to the others. This book really fleshed her out and made her more real for me. With all the drama, chaos and scandal surrounding the other women in Henry's life all we really know about Anne of Cleves is that he didn't like her. She is a brief mention in his tumultuous marital history before we race on to the promiscuous Catherine Howard. This book gives the reader a chance to stop and get to know her a bit. Imagine how she felt to be in a strange land, married to a man who was not attracted to her and called her a "Flanders Mare". I would recommend this book, if only so we can take a moment to remember this oft overlooked Queen.
Ienekan
I was very happy when I found this book. I have always found Anne of Cleves the most interesting of Henry VIII's wives, Catherine of Aragon being a close second. As a person, Anne was said to be kind and gentle, understanding to the common people, and what reports that still exist of her character, she seems to have been a genuinely lovely person. There are hundreds of books written, both fictionally and non-fictionally, about Henry's other wives, however Anne of Cleves has very few books about her and the traumatic and short-lived marriage to her murderous husband. This book is a very sweet story of Anne, and how from the moment Henry got his hands on Holbein's miniature of her, her life changed, both for the better and worse. She came from the very strict Lutheran duchy of Cleves (now part of Belgium, Luxembourg, and parts of Germany), to the glittering, and what would be dubbed extremely sinful by the standards of her homeland, court of England. Suddenly thrust into the role of Queen and stepmother to the cold and distant, and very Catholic Mary, the young and excepting seven-year-old Elizabeth, and the sickly and over coddled Edward, she gladly takes on her new roles with the utmost love and care for her new adopted homeland and the subjects of this realm...for a short six months or so. Everything that is done from the moment she arrives on English soil goes terribly wrong. The overtly Catholic Howard faction (related to both ill-fated queens Anne Boleyn, and Catherine Howard) do everything in there power to spoil things between Henry and Anne so they may quickly set up their family member Catherine Howard as the next Queen of England (though with Henry's track record for discarding wives, including one of their own, just makes you sick...its all about selfish ambition with these people). Although Anne quickly realizes this, she never conducts herself with anything than the decorum of a princess in her own right, which gave me tremendous respect for her. With her kind heart and optimistic attitude, she quickly wins over the hearts of the people, and because she is a foreign princess, Henry cannot discard her the way he did with Anne Boleyn. For this reason, and her tenderness for his children, Henry spares her life (so gracious of him...yes, sarcasm intended), but Thomas Cromwell, his ever ready henchman of a secretary, loses his life for the arrangement of this marriage, and Hans Holbein, the immensely talented court painter, falls out of favor because Henry thinks he lied about her beauty. Although she is removed from her position as Queen of England, Henry makes her an offer to be his "most beloved, and honored sister," and is given a yearly pension to quietly retire from court, and unlike her predecessor Catherine of Aragon, make way silently for his new wife. She then is able to live a life in her new country as a free and uninhibited woman, however destined to be unmarried and childless which hurts the family oriented Anne. One thing I liked about this book is a romance between her and Holbein, although sadly it is never realized to its full potential. She lives out her days never retuning to Cleves and remains a much beloved figure, both publicly snd privately (even the stoic Mary loves her Lutheran stepmother, regardless of her now notorious feelings toward Protestants). Anyone who is a fan of historical fiction, or the time of Henry VIII and his many wives, all with sad fates that each one meets and deals with in her own way, this book is a delightful read.
Qumen
Lately, there has been a feeding frenzy in the publishing and video world on that most infamous of kings, Henry VIII of England. There are miniseries and movies, and publishing houses are eagerly digging into their backlists and resurrecting novels that have anything to do with the Tudors and bringing them back into the hands of eager readers.

One of the better forays has been the novels of the late Margaret Campbell Barnes, who wrote quite a few historical novels based on English monarchy. Quite possibly her best one was this, My Lady of Cleves, centered around the life of the woman who was probably the luckiest of Henry's wives, and who managed to escape him reasonably unscathed.

The novel opens after the death of Queen Jane Seymour, who has died giving birth to the son that Henry VIII so desperately craves. Now his councilors are suggesting that he marry, this time to a foreign princess who will bring a powerful alliance with a continental power. But the king isn't so certain, he wants a biddable, buxom Englishwoman for a wife, and bluntly says so. But his chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, is pushing for one of the princesses of a little duchy in the Netherlands, called Cleves. There are two sisters, but no one can really remember if they are attractive enough or not. To solve this problem, the court painter, Hans Holbein is sent on a tour of Europe, as it were, to paint the likenesses of several candidates for Henry's next wife. When Holbein arrives in Cleves, he discovers an affinity with the elder of the two girls, Anne.

Compared to her vivacious sister, Amelia, Anne is nearly unnoticeable. She is more interested in making sure that the ducal household is running smoothly, than in having any sort of the courtly arts that Henry VIII enjoys so much. She finds in the artist someone that she can talk to frankly and honestly. After Holbein sends the completed portraits to England, it is Anne who is chosen to be Henry's bride.

For Anne, she is continually worried about thoughts that she is not nearly good enough to be Henry's queen. Her clothing is dowdy and too German, she doesn't have any musical skills, nor can she dance and flirt. Her English ladies in waiting seem to be quietly laughing at her, and then there's the fact that her skill at speaking English is still very weak. To top it all off, the king seems to be very unhappy with her, but no one will tell her why. Still, she manages to behave with plenty of regal style, bearing her suffering with stoicism and dignity.

And she does make friends. One of them is a young lady-in-waiting, Catherine Howard, a pert, lively girl that Anne likes. And a young man named Thomas Culpepper, who is attracted to Catherine, but never seems to make a move to make her his own. As to Anne's marriage, it only lasts six months, and Anne is terrified that she'll either end up on the executioner's scaffold, or sent back to Cleves in disgrace...

History shows that Anne made the best of a bad situation by quickly agreeing to Henry's demands when he wanted to annul their marriage. For her reward, she received several homes, and a generous stipend, along with the title of 'The King's Sister.' What makes Barnes' novel so interesting is that she continues the story after Anne ceases being a queen -- we get to see the unhappy story of Catherine Howard played out, Hans Holbein's career in England, and some terrific insights into the life of the Tudor court in the latter portion of Henry VIII's reign.

The storytelling is smart, believable and moves at a steady pace throughout. Everyone in this novel is played out as a sympathetic character, each having their own motivations to play out. What I really did like was that all of the characters are given not just motivations, but purposes, some tragic, some happy, and Anne herself is a very likeable person, working at making her life in England a success, and managing to be that rarity -- a queen of Henry's that perhaps had the happiest fate of all. She was a favourite of all three of Henry's children, providing a safe, accepting environment that simply let them be children.

Despite being published in 1946, this is a very readable work and didn't feel at all dated in style. This new edition has a list of reader group questions, written by Barnes great-granddaughter, Elizabeth R. Blaufox. The trade paperback edition is rather handsome and includes a genealogy chart showing the links between the Tudor and Howard families.

Margaret Campbell Barnes was born in 1891 to 1962. She wrote nearly a dozen historical novels, all of which sold well. I first encountered her novels as teenager and enjoyed them immensely, and I hope that more of her work will be reprinted in the future.