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Fiction
Author: Andrea Lingenfelter,Mian Mian
ISBN: 0316563560
Subcategory: Contemporary
Pages 304 pages
Publisher Back Bay Books; First Edition edition (August 2003)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 200
ePUB size: 1166 kb
FB2 size: 1170 kb
DJVU size: 1135 kb
Other formats: mbr lrf lrf txt

eBook Candy download

by Andrea Lingenfelter,Mian Mian


Chinese novelist Mian Mian's American debut offers readers a vicarious journey to a place and time shrouded in mystery: gritty, underground China of the late 1980s through mid-1990s.

Chinese novelist Mian Mian's American debut offers readers a vicarious journey to a place and time shrouded in mystery: gritty, underground China of the late 1980s through mid-1990s. The story begins in Shanghai, when a classmate's suicide prompts narrator Hong to drop out of high school. Fearing she'll never get a job without an education, Hong heads south to the Special Economic Zone, where the government has lifted restrictions so business can flourish.

Mian Mian did not write her story for the intellectuals out there (her words), but she tried to capture the feeling, the zeitgeist of her generation instead. Her imagination is redemptive. Special praise is due, too, to Andrea Lingenfelter, who has rendered the original I love this book. In that, I think she succeeded, for she sold miraculously well (even after her writings were banned in China). Hers is a semi-autobiographic novel that does not shy away from explicit sex (and it is everywhere, so easy to come by), drug abuse, alcohol addiction and life in the fast lane (albeit funded by other people's money). I find it very restful. I do not like books that portray heroin addiction as heroic.

Candy: A Novel, Mian Mian ; Translated by Andrea Lingenfelter. This startling and subversive novel is a blast of sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll that opens up to us a modern China we've never seen before. Candy 9780316563567 by Andrea Lingenfelter Paperback. Brand new: lowest price.

The translator of two novels by Lilian Lee, The Last Princess of Manchuria and Farewell My Concubine, and more recently the novel Candy by Mian Mian as well as a new book-length selection of work by the poet Zhai Yongming, Andrea Lingenfelter is one of America's most seasoned translators of contemporary women's writings from China.

Chinese authorities banned Mian Mian's first novel, Candy, when it was published in 2000, denouncing .

Chinese authorities banned Mian Mian's first novel, Candy, when it was published in 2000, denouncing her as "a poster child for spiritual pollution. But censorship did not dampen sales. Candy quickly became an underground best-seller.

Mian Mian's emphasis on the body with its humanistic tendencies of freeing the individual reflects a deepseated moral concern about the destructive potential of the newly found pleasures of the SEZ at the most intimate level

Mian Mian's emphasis on the body with its humanistic tendencies of freeing the individual reflects a deepseated moral concern about the destructive potential of the newly found pleasures of the SEZ at the most intimate level

Read online books written by Mian Mian in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Candy at ReadAnyBook.

Read online books written by Mian Mian in our e-reader absolutely for free.

Mian Mian's novel Candy, a rock-and-roll drug addict love story, was banned by the government four months after it was first published but soon pirated versions (I've read there are up to eight different ones).

Mian Mian's novel Candy, a rock-and-roll drug addict love story, was banned by the government four months after it was first published but soon pirated versions (I've read there are up to eight different ones) appeared on the street and flourished. Candy is the deeply personal story of Hong, a confused, passionate, and muddled Chinese girl who breaks away from her staid upbringing and alternates between hanging out in Shanghai and Shenzen, which the translator's note says is a Special Economic Zone (SEZ).

An international literary phenomenon-now available for the first time in English translation-Candy is a hip, harrowing tale of risk and desire, the story of a young Chinese woman forging a life for herself in a world seemingly devoid of guidelines. Hong, who narrates the novel, and whose life in many ways parallels the author's own, drops out of high school and runs away at age 17 to the frontier city of Shenzen. As Hong navigates the temptations of the city, she quickly falls in love with a young musician and together they dive into a cruel netherworld of alcohol, drugs, and excess, a life that fails to satisfy Hong's craving for an authentic self, and for a love that will define her. This startling and subversive novel is a blast of sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll that opens up to us a modern China we've never seen before. - Banned in China-with Mian Mian labeled the 'poster child for spiritual pollution'-CANDY still managed to sell 60,000 copies, as well as countless additional copies in pirated editions. - CANDY has been published in eight countries to date and has become a bestseller in France.
Bodwyn
Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg reincarnated as a Chinese woman. The similarities are astounding. If you are interested in modern Chinese "underground" life, this is worth reading. I'm not sure how much of the book is fiction and how much is real life. I think it's both.
Shan
I needed this book for a women's studies course and it was in great condition and was a great read overall. I had finished the book before it was even assigned!
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
Wow what a ready. The book itself is in good condition and one that I have been wishing to get
lifestyle
I love this book! Had to purchase a copy for a friend. Excellent condition! wonderful purchase experiance!
Vudozilkree
Although this text was very discouraging for the reader, I got to read to the end because this novel still had something compelling to read on. It is badly written and some parts, insufficiently edited. However, it has more than what it suffers for and I am glad that I read. It might be the energy the author carries or her urgency and conviction to communicate what she saw in her life; youth. The particular time and the place were valuable to be documented but you understand in the end that it is about being young and the pains you have to go through the phase in your life, so it is somehow universal. The author was somehow gifted to capture the condition through her own experiences and view the specific location of the history.

The story unfolds with the convention of 'boy meets girl' if tragic one; the master narrator has literally given in to a musician/junky guy who recently came back from England. You cannot knock yet even if it sounds like a cliche already because the way this cliched story is handled with such an unpredictable twist; this relationship was initiated by this borderline rape case and the narrator, the alter ego of the author, somehow could not resist him as opposed to indicting this man for the harm he did to her already. The novel ends when the fatal love (and the harm) was exhausted. This makes you think something universal like what makes people stay in a relationship and what makes them leave. I was interested in what made this girl stay with him and what made her decide that she was done with him. It was after all a very peculiar love story, which indicates that the generations' being exposed to foreign concepts such as individuality and woman's independence and grappling with the concept of 'romantic love' instead of dealing with the opposite sex for mating based on procreation. This novel made me rethink about people's behavior and their different attitudes toward certain values and norms a society imposes upon its people.

Another thing that I found interesting was that these people in the novel never seemed to work and kept idling away except a couple of prostitutes the author affectionately followed through. Given it is set in the particular time in China, I found the author's deliberate effort novel when she ignores, or even rebels against the social and moral value of productivity' in the communist regime by slacking. Yet the motif remained unclear especially when combined with the drug addiction these people fall into. (Or the addiction might really be what really held the key to every aspect here. This is important, but seems really understudied.) Was this (never trying to work) her statement to refuse to be appropriated in the society where one's sacrificial commitment to labor was the ultimate value?) This provides material even for social studies in the West for its x-raying human conditions in the set up that we never got to experience and will never see again.
Granijurus
I started the book with optismism since I am interested in this genre of Chinese 'freedom writers' if you will. Her nemesis's SHANGHAI BABY was rather enjoyable, so why not give this book a try? It's suppose to be semi-autobiographical.

The first chapter was original about her high school days, and all was pretty captivating till about half the book. Then her whiny tone of self pity, indulgent suicidal thoughts, and her destructive relationship patterns get old and repetitive. All the sympathy and understanding that I tried to keep an open mind for her character deteriorated to something like loathing . Nay, more for her style of writing and making the readers despise her. It just became annoying to read as she repeated and whined about her cycle of drugs, suicidal thoughts, her boyfriend leaving her, and repeat X 10. I finished it out of the pure principle of finishing a book, but geez, what a waste of time that was.

The only worthy bits for me were her stories of the men and women that she came across. Somehow she wrote them so simply and straightforth that it left a deeper impression than her own character. Maybe that's what she should have done...put the character Hong's lifestory into a short excerp among short essays of people who really had an interesting experience to tell.
Bukelv
I suppose the author deserves some praise for writing on a taboo subject in limited Chinese society. But this book does not deserve the praise that it's getting. I'm reading this for a Modern Chinese class for college and it's awful.

The characters are selfish, neurotic and not even autobiographical. The book revolves around Hong, after her classmates suicide, she runs off to Southern China a.k.a. special economic zone. She gets rape, meets a musician that cheats on her nonstop and drinks and does drugs. Throughout the book, the character never progresses, they are eternally in their adolescent moody attitude, selfish habits and lazy persona. They never try to improve their lives by doing something better but continues to sleep around with random people, doing drugs and attempting to commit suicide. And the ultimate upset is that the character never progressed, they remain the same person after 10 years of heroin, weed and life.

As a Chinese girl growing up in the US, i am very disappointed and embarrassed by this book. The author depicts a needy, co-dependent girl that doesn't want to grow up. I struggle to get through the book (skipping meaningless rape/sex/oral scenes throughout).Hong tries to kill herself to get her boyfriend back--degrading women everywhere. Depicting Chinese females as weak and manipulative is reinforcing and upholding sexist views that have existed for centuries.

I feel if an American author wrote this novel, it would be collecting dust somewhere in the bookstore but since the author is Chinese, people are paying more attention to it. Reading this book is a waste of my time. If i wanted a autobiographical novel about drugs and rock and roll, i would read up on Kurt Cobain (at least those stories are real).

The author should take her own advice, write something real. Or something better.