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Fiction
Author: Robert Tressell
ISBN: 1404328017
Subcategory: Classics
Pages 640 pages
Publisher IndyPublish (August 24, 2002)
Language English
Category: Fiction
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 190
ePUB size: 1442 kb
FB2 size: 1215 kb
DJVU size: 1988 kb
Other formats: doc azw doc mobi

eBook The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists download

by Robert Tressell


The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists (1914) is a semi-biographical novel by the Irish house painter and sign writer Robert Noonan, who wrote the book in his spare time under the pen name Robert Tressell

The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists (1914) is a semi-biographical novel by the Irish house painter and sign writer Robert Noonan, who wrote the book in his spare time under the pen name Robert Tressell

Robert Tressel's Ragged Trousered Philanthropists is a prophetic book But, having read The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, I can now understand why intellectuals, and anyone who was not so worn out by hard work and starvation that they ha. .

Robert Tressel's Ragged Trousered Philanthropists is a prophetic book. One that delivers a story that, a hundred years after its writing, is still relevant to the human condition today. But, having read The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, I can now understand why intellectuals, and anyone who was not so worn out by hard work and starvation that they had the energy to think about things, would have believed that socialism was the answer to conquering the poverty that most ordinary, working people endured up to, I believe, the second World War.

The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. автор: Robert Tressell. Project Gutenberg's The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, by Robert Tressell. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever

The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. Читать на английском и переводить текст. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at ww. utenberg. Title: The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. Author: Robert Tressell. Posting Date: April 22, 2009 Release Date: January, 2003 First Posted: June 13, 2001. Check to see where your area ranks on the deprivation list.

The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists By. Robert Tressell. Another answer is that 'The Philanthropists' is not a treatise or essay, but a novel. My main object was to write a readable story full of human interest and based on the happenings of everyday life, the subject of Socialism being treated incidentally. This was the task I set myself.

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Robert Tressell (17 April 1870 – 3 February 1911) was the nom-de-plume of Robert Croker, latterly Robert Noonan, an Irish writer best known for his novel The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. ressell was born in Dublin, in Ireland, when it was part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the illegitimate son of Samuel Croker, a senior member of the Royal Irish Constabulary. He was christened Robert Croker in the Roman Catholic Church. His father, who was not Catholic, had his own family, but attempted to provide for Robert financially before his death in 1875.

Book by Tressell, Robert
Amarin
This was an insightful and thought provoking book for me. In my opinion, it’s a masterpiece, well written with engaging characters that provoke thought and a deeper look into society today. Although based in Edwardian England 100 years ago, the philosophical challenges in today’s society are still there and this book is still relevant. History does indeed repeat itself or really never changes. The social “classes” in the book, still exist today as do the challenges with immigration, social reform, commercialism, capitalism, and religion. They may have different names and/or places, but they are essentially the same.
The author creates a very realistic town named, Mugsborough, with rich characters that I came to love and feel for. I was on the edge of my seat, praying that all would be well…that we wouldn’t lose a character to displacement, death, starvation, or suicide. I wouldn’t say the story was depressing in the way it was told, rather realistic of the times then, and perhaps in some ways, the times today. The distinctions between the classes of society and how those in each class view themselves and religion seem to not have changed in the past 100 years.
I heard that this book played a big part in the creation of unions/labor parties. I can certainly see why…but given that 100 years past, I still have to ask the question, did anything really change? It doesn’t matter what country you look at, people are still in poverty, still out of work, still starving, and still dying, despite government intervention. Those that were “rich and/or thinkers” can be stripped of everything and still will rise to the same position again—while those that had not continue to “have not”. Can we really ever change the state of “manhood?”
godlike
The hypocrisies of religion. The abject failure of so-called charity. The bureaucratic benefits system, built to stop people getting the help they need. The sufferings of not only the slave-driven working-class, but also the middle-class. The political apathy and tribalism that blinds people to their best interests.

This sounds like a description of the political landscape as we see it today. But this is what has been happening for centuries.

Robert Tressel's Ragged Trousered​ Philanthropists is a prophetic book. One that delivers a story that, a hundred years after its writing, is still relevant to the human condition today.

Must read.
Balladolbine
As a boy I lived not so far from Hastings where this book takes place. My grandfather in 1911, the year of this book was a bricklayer and I fancy was a contempory of the men in that book. The story made me choke up as I thought of how they lived...to the day he died in 1962, he never enjoyed the benefits of electricity and hot running water. This is a very true story and a wonderful read albeit sad at times.
Hirah
A worse product I cannot imagine.
The book has been reprinted in the shoddiest fashion.
The main title and chapter headings repeat themselves throughout the text. New paragraphs start into the page, some are preceded by the number 4.
I have received a yotally unreaable, unsuitable product.
Ironically the book is about large companies ripping off the populace - Well I've been well and truely ripped off a scandalous product which should never have left the US. Obviously Amozon have no quality control.
This book will be circulated round a discerning ex-pat community, lets see if they order off Amazon.
Goktilar
Good book, there are very few books of this type. Jack London did one, George Orwell did a couple, Henry Mayhew did one, and Dickens sprinkled observations of how life is for the bottom 10% all through his books. So if you like this type of book, this is one of the handful that exist.
GYBYXOH
In these dark days of a liar and a fraud in the White House, I decided to revisit this classic. It was well worth it. The book is more relevant now than when I first read it as a young man, over forty years ago. Should be mandatory for all students
Maucage
I could never understand how anyone could ever have thought that communism would work. After all, most humans like to have something to strive for, like to hope that by their efforts they will be able to improve their lives; most humans, as far as I am aware, have no burning ambition to be the same as everyone else - in any aspect of life. But, having read The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, I can now understand why intellectuals, and anyone who was not so worn out by hard work and starvation that they had the energy to think about things, would have believed that socialism was the answer to conquering the poverty that most ordinary, working people endured up to, I believe, the second World War.

I found this book interesting, informative and heart-rending - heart-rending that so many hardworking people had to live in such awful conditions; and touching that many of these extremely poor people would still do whatever little they could to try to help those they perceived to be even worse off than themselves.

I did feel that the book went on at over-great length on occasions about the theory/philosophy behind socialism, eg Barrington's lectures, but this is a very small criticism of an excellent book.

I also liked that the book showed that these men living in dire circumstances still maintained (most of them) a sense of humour.
If you have any interest in socialism, communism, revolution, in politics generally or in the charm of the beautiful and impoverished people of Britain at the turn of the century, have a read. It's a dry one, to be sure! But well worth sticking with!
The short manifesto in chapter 45 "The Great Oration" is spellbinding. A triumph! Enjoy!