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eBook Batman: Officer Down download
Fantasy
Author: Rick Burchett,Greg Rucka
ISBN: 1840234105
Subcategory: Science Fiction
Pages 168 pages
Publisher Titan Books Ltd (September 28, 2001)
Language English
Category: Fantasy
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 339
ePUB size: 1601 kb
FB2 size: 1422 kb
DJVU size: 1680 kb
Other formats: mbr lrf lrf lit

eBook Batman: Officer Down download

by Rick Burchett,Greg Rucka


Batman: Gotham Knights "Officer Down, Part Seven: The End" (with Rick Burchett, January 2001) collected in Batman: Officer Down . Spies Like Us: Greg Rucka Interview, Comic Book Resources, March 28, 2001.

Batman: Gotham Knights "Officer Down, Part Seven: The End" (with Rick Burchett, January 2001) collected in Batman: Officer Down - New Gotham, Volume 2 (tpb, 168 pages, 2001, ISBN 1-5638-9787-3). President Luthor Secret Files and Origins "The Why" (with Matthew Clark, January 2001). Batman: The 10-Cent Adventure, one-shot, "The Fool's Errand" (with Rick Burchett, January 2002) collected in Batman: Bruce Wayne - Murderer? (tpb, 264 pages, 2002, ISBN 1-5638-9913-2). Interview on Wordballoon podcast (Part 1 of 2) April 2007.

Batman: Officer Down collects a crossover story from the early 2000s where Jim Gordon is shot and the Bat family must . Art wise, Officer Down lacks consistency

Batman: Officer Down collects a crossover story from the early 2000s where Jim Gordon is shot and the Bat family must track down his assailant. The issues collected are Batman Robin Birds of Prey Catwoman Nightwing Detective and Gotham Knights Writers include Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker, Chuck Dixon and Devin Grayson. Art wise, Officer Down lacks consistency. So when all's said and done, what makes Officer Down worth reading?

Rucka, Greg; Burchett, Rick; Ramos, Rodney. Batman created by Bob Kane. Originally published in single magazine form as issues in various comic book series.

Rucka, Greg; Burchett, Rick; Ramos, Rodney. New York : DC Comics. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

This paperback collects the Batman: Officer Down storyline. This storyline originally was published in seven different comic book series in March, 2001

This paperback collects the Batman: Officer Down storyline. This storyline originally was published in seven different comic book series in March, 2001. This story was written by Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker, Chuck Dixon, Bronwyn Carlton, Devin Grayson and Nunzio DeFilippis. The illustrations are by Rick Burchett, Jacob Pander, Arnold Pander, N. Steven Harris, Mike Lilly and Mike Collins.

Batman: Officer Down. Rick Burchett (Illustrator)

Batman: Officer Down. DC Comics - The Legend of Batman. Rick Burchett (Illustrator). Mike Lilly (Illustrator). mor. ike Collins (Illustrator), Jacob Pander (Illustrator), Arnold Pander (Illustrator), R. Steven Harris (Illustrator. ess. Greg Rucka, is an American comic book writer and novelist, known for his work on such comics as Action Comics, Batwoman: Detective Comics, and the miniseries Superman: World of New Krypton for DC Comics, and for novels such as his Queen & Country series. Other books in the series. DC Comics - The Legend of Batman (1 - 10 of 55 books). by Greg Rucka · Ed Brubaker · Chuck Dixon · Bronwyn Carlton · Devin Grayson · Nunzio DeFilippis · Rick Burchett · Mike Lilly · Mike Collins · Jacob Pander · Arnold Pander · R. Steven Harris. Commissioner Gordon's been shot!Three shots from the darkness, and the Dark Knight's greatest ally has fallen. Batman, sworn to bring the gunman to justice, begins his hunt with the only eyewitness to the crime - Catwoman! But the trail to Gordon's attac. Batman: No Man's Land, Vol. 4.

Written by Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker and others; Art by Rick Burchett, Jacob and Arnold Pander, and others

Written by Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker and others; Art by Rick Burchett, Jacob and Arnold Pander, and others. Batman must solve a mystery of an extremly personal nature: Who shot Commissioner James Gordon three times in the back? As one of his dearest friends lies close to death, the Dark Knight begins his investigation with the only eyewitness, Catwoman.

Written by Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker and others; Art by Rick Burchett, Jacob and Arnold Pander, and others Batman must solve a mystery of an. .Part of the Batman Series and Batman: New Gotham ( Series). by Mike Collins, Greg Rucka, Rick Burchett.

Written by Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker and others; Art by Rick Burchett, Jacob and Arnold Pander, and others Batman must solve a mystery of an extremly personal nature:.

Written by greg rucka; art by rick burchett and rodney ramos; painted cover by durwin talon

Written by greg rucka; art by rick burchett and rodney ramos; painted cover by durwin talon. Part 1(of 8) of the pulse-pounding "Officer Down" storyline! As James Gordon contemplates his many years on the police force, a sinister threat looms nearby. After a violent attack, things in Gotham never will be the same again!

Greg Rucka has expressed a desire for at least two years to write a comic set in Colonial America, and judging .

Greg Rucka has expressed a desire for at least two years to write a comic set in Colonial America, and judging from this blog entry, he's getting his wish. The two pages of art by Rucka's former Batman collaborator Rick Burchett are labeled "Gowanus," which I'm going to go out on a limb and guess is a reference to Brooklyn's Gowanus neighborhood, site of the opening skirmish of the Battle of Long Island - the first major battle of the American Revolution.

Cordabor
Ok if you want to see the usual gang of characters in the Bat Family from a different perspective- loss of two stars because the characters seem SO different from how they are in other stories that they're nearly unrecognizable in some cases I you've been a long time reader. But you do get to see a Batman story here that isn't solely focused on Bruce Wayne but more on his supporting characters and the police of Gotham. Interesting story idea but perhaps not executed in as exciting a way as a lot of readers would have liked. Three stars for the idea of story and premise- loss of two stars for out of character heroes (even the ones without costumes) and a weak execution.
Fohuginn
Batman: Officer Down collects a crossover story from the early 2000s where Jim Gordon is shot and the Bat family must track down his assailant. The issues collected are Batman #587, Robin #86, Birds of Prey #27, Catwoman #90, Nightwing #53, Detective #754, and Gotham Knights #13. Writers include Greg Rucka, Ed Brubaker, Chuck Dixon and Devin Grayson.

The story falls into the standard crossover pattern of having every related Bat-title contribute a chapter, and while many of the problems associated with this method are present, the end result holds together relatively well. There is a definable beginning, middle and end to the arc, and the chapters flow into each other without having jarring changes in narration and tone. In other words, not knowing what the original publishing order was, I'd be hard-pressed to tell you which chapter was the 'Robin' issue, 'Nightwing' issue or 'Birds of Prey'. I'm sure a few of the creative teams had to dial back the usual focus of their books to achieve this, but the end product runs much smoother in collected form.

The story stumbles in two places: The first is a lackluster middle portion that involves the hunt for Catwoman - it's a pedestrian cat-and-mouse game (pun intended) that pads an otherwise character-driven story. The other baffling decision is to keep Batman at Gordon's bedside while his sidekicks do the actual sleuthing. I can understand wanting to convey Batman's sense of loss and despair, but it keeps him out of the story for far too long with minimal return. An angry Batman leading the charge in finding Gordon's gunman would've been much more effective. Art wise, Officer Down lacks consistency. My favorite is Rick Burchett who draws 3 of the chapters, but none of the others manage more than standard comic fare and The Pander Brothers' style in particular clashes against everything else.

So when all's said and done, what makes Officer Down worth reading? Rucka and Brubaker. Their creative direction for this story sets up changes in the status quo that become the basis of Gotham Central Book One: In the Line of Duty. It's not necessary to read this to enjoy the latter, but there are shades of what's to come including the police procedural feel of chapter six and the establishing of supporting players in the GCPD. These moments more than make up for the weaker aspects of the story.

Worth taking a look at, especially in conjunction with Gotham Central.
Gtonydne
This is where I say: I'm sort of a sucker for the Cataclysm-No Man's Land storyline. Cataclysm is one of my favorite comic books I've read, and two books into No Man's Land and I'm digging that one, too. When I picked this up, though, I didn't realize it was tied into that story line, but I was glad to see that it was.

Anyway. It's Commissioner Gordon's birthday, and after his party, someone shoots him in the back. Catwoman is seen fleeing the scene of the crime, and becomes the prime suspect. First Batman doesn't want to answer the call, and then has a hard time being dragged away from Gordon's side, leaving the job of finding Gordon's attacker up to the Bat Family and Oracle - who is, understandably, devastated.

The strength of this book is that it brings so many characters together, giving them all their moments to shine. Gordon is, after all, family, and the Bat Family does not take well to attacks on family.

What I've noticed is: I don't really have anything to say on the art unless I don't like it, and the only thing that really stood out to me was that I was not a fan of the Babs illustration in at least two (and possibly more) of the issues that make up this book. I like the more traditional Babs: long red hair, a certain sophistication. I apparently do not like Babs looking punkish (early in the book) or insane with anger (later in the book).

Over all, I came away with a rather positive response to this book, probably because it played to the things I like best: team, team, and team. It seems like it's a fitting conclusion (as much as these things are ever concluded) to the Cataclysm/No Man's Land storyline.
Yla
I read this story years ago and its impact hasn't diminished one bit since the night I first experienced it. One of the highest in a large field of outstanding Batman and Batman-related arcs DC has published over the years, "Batman: Officer Down" is a razor-tight and simmering-with-suspense arc that brought about lasting changes into the Gotham corner of the DC Universe. If you're a regular DC reader, you probably long since know which changes were and which weren't wrought by this event, but if you're a new or returning reader, perhaps somebody who saw "Batman Begins", this collection is actually not a bad place to jump into the Batman line.

Written by some of comics's best writers (riveting dialogue!) and drawn by some of the best artists, in "Officer Down" the odds finally catch up with one of Gotham City's mainstay protectors as Commisioner Jim Gordon is gunned down in the streets. As Gordon clings to life in the hospital - with very little foreshadowing of whether he'll make it or not - the hunt is on for the assailant, by both the Gotham Police Department and the masked defenders of Gotham. Features one of the most brilliant police room interrogation scenes in any form of storytelling as just one of its deeply absorbing angles. Essential for DC fans.

As a sidenote, Batgirl # 12 is a tie-in to the crossover but not an 'official' part of it, hence its ommission from the book, and Detective Comics # 755 is the outstanding follow-up issue to the whole saga. Fans may want to pick those two issues up along with this Trade Paperback.