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Fantasy
Author: Guy Gavriel Kay
ISBN: 0451451155
Subcategory: Fantasy
Publisher Roc (October 1, 1991)
Language English
Category: Fantasy
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 336
ePUB size: 1124 kb
FB2 size: 1517 kb
DJVU size: 1710 kb
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eBook TIGANA download

by Guy Gavriel Kay


GUY GAVRIEL KAY is the author of ten novels: The Summer Tree, The Wandering Fire, and The Darkest Road (which comprise The Fionavar Tapestry); Tigana; A. .Guy gavriel kay. Published by the Penguin Group

GUY GAVRIEL KAY is the author of ten novels: The Summer Tree, The Wandering Fire, and The Darkest Road (which comprise The Fionavar Tapestry); Tigana; A Song for Arbonne; The Lions of Al-Rassan; Sailing to Sarantium and Lord of Emperors (which comprise The Sarantine Mosaic); The Last Light of the Sun; and, most recently, Ysabel. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4P 2Y3 (a division of Pearson Canada In. Penguin Group (USA) In. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, .

Guy Gavriel Kay is a great prose writer. I love this book so much Alhamdulillah. I am surprise that Guy Gavriel Kay's books aren't well recognized and I really love his writing style too. Alhamdulillah

Guy Gavriel Kay is a great prose writer. It doesn't even matter if fantasy isn't your thing because this book does not read like fantasy. It reads like the sort of well-written historical fiction that weaves in myths to tell the tales of a lost time. Alhamdulillah. There is a few authors who I love their writing style: Bram Stoker . Tolkien James Clavell Guy Gavriel Kay Robert Jordan Brandon 'Tigana' is the first book I have read by Guy Gavriel Kay. I have heard of 'Tigana' book from Brandon Sanderson.

Guy Gavriel Kay is a Canadian author of fantasy fiction. Many of his novels are set in fictional realms that resemble real places during real historical. See if your friends have read any of Guy Gavriel Kay's books. Guy Gavriel Kay’s Followers (5,603).

Tigana is a 1990 fantasy novel by Canadian writer Guy Gavriel Kay. The novel is set in a fictional world, in a region called the Peninsula of the Palm, which somewhat resembles renaissance Italy as well as the Peloponnese in shape

Tigana is a 1990 fantasy novel by Canadian writer Guy Gavriel Kay. The novel is set in a fictional world, in a region called the Peninsula of the Palm, which somewhat resembles renaissance Italy as well as the Peloponnese in shape. The world where Tigana takes place is a planet orbited by two moons.

TIGANA by Guy Gavriel Kay. All that you held most dear you will put by and leave behind you; and this is the arrow the longbow of your exile first lets fly. You will come to know how bitter as salt and stone is the bread of others. You will come to know how bitter as salt and stone is the bread of others, how hard the way that goes up and down stairs that never are your ow. What can a flame remember? If it remembers a little less than is necessary, it goes out; if it remembers a little more than is necessary, it goes out. If only it could teach us, while it burns, to remember correctly. George Seferis, "Stratis the Sailor Describes a Man".

Guy Gavriel Kay. Beyond harbour and town the slopes mounting to the hills had been wild with fall colours. READ BOOK: Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay online free. You can read book Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay in our library for absolutely free.

Город: Toronto, CanadaПодписчиков: 22 ты. себе: Canadian author. Newest book, A BRIGHTNESS LONG AGO was published May 14. Tigana. If anything lasts for any length of time after us it will be art such as yours. Our books and music, Orsaria’s green and white tower in Avalle. For my brothers, Jeffrey and Rex. Contents. He paused, and returned to his original thought.

TIGANA by Guy Gavriel Kay All that you held most dear you will put by and leave behind you; and this is the arrow the longbow of your exile first lets fly. You will come to know how bitter as salt and stone is the bread of others, how hard the way that goes up and down stairs that never are your own. Dante, "The Paradiso" What can a flame remember? If it remembers a little less than is necessary, it goes out; if it remembers a little more than is necessary, it goes ou. All that you held most dear you will put by. and leave behind you; and this is the arrow the longbow of your exile first lets fly.

Allesan, son of the king of Tigana, and other survivors of the forgotten world band together to plot the demise of Brandin of Ygrath
Lanin
Tigana is Kay's best book to date, and that is saying a whole lot. This very gifted writer has crafted an intricate and compellingly believable fantasy world caught in the midst of a civil war to depose its evil wizard king, Brandin. I know that sounds like a familiar plot, but in Kay's master hands the story stands out and above from all the rest. The story is divided between focusing on the rebels and on Brandin and his household, and gradually the reader comes to be invested in both plot lines. Amazingly, Brandin is fleshed out as a sympathetic character without the usual plot devices; he's not the tormented soul, the misunderstood misfit or the charming scoundrel. He is quite capable of committing--and routinely does commit--horrific and evil acts. And yet, somehow Kay enables the reader to understand that Brandin is worthy of the love he receives. At the gripping climax, it is wrenching to choose which side should win. Imagine standing with Frodo at the Crack of Doom, hoping for Good to prevail, knowing Good should prevail, but simultaneously having gotten to know and understand Sauron so well that part of you hopes he might come out alright, too. Yes. It's that good.
ARE
Be forewarned and be prepared to fall in love. Be prepared to reach the heights and depths that is the very redoubtable sign of it.

That's how it is with all of Guy Gavriel Kay's books. Not just with a one or two characters but with many characters. Like in one of those good movies where a supporting character might even steal the spotlight just because the actor is somehow so real. Like a great director Kay directs our eye and feelings even more than he directs a scene. We find ourselves suddenly intimately involved with a supporting cast. Somehow each one is found worthy without great show of it. That's a creator's true gift.

Kay reveals and renders even the most mundane of "minor" characters with a poet's grace, noticing with a poet's eye (and tongue) the small details that elevate each of us to something of the respect if not dignity each (and each of us) deserves, honestly. And because it's so intimate we become vulnerable. Be prepared, if such can ever happen.

His main characters, all, exemplify mythic qualities (as do his novels), yet unlike mythic figures there's a humanity that makes even something like yearning seem noble. Be prepared that you will find yourselves great supporters of people you thought you might disdain and dislike; be prepared that you will hurt for them and cheer for them. As if you can ever warn someone - as if you could warn parents properly that they will feel anxiety and fear and great cheer.

Well, I tried. This is one of Kay's very best. Like the region for which the book is named, this mythic story and its characters will likely find its true named place inside you.
Oppebro
Fantasy as you have seldom read it.
Forget the gritty details of warfare as in Eriksson books. Forget awesome displays of magic.
This book will take your hand and guide you with care and tenderness of a world ripped apart by pride, violence, coldness, avidity and stupidity.
Magic does exist, but it is difficult to wield, and a selected few are able to do it.
The story itself is compassionate and tender, depicting the adventures of a handful of irreducible dreamers that wish to make right what was made wrong twenty years before.
But after so many years, to make something right may mean to bring sufferance of a new kind, among people who have grown within the new set if rules.
The sentiments aroused during the reading are powerful. The insight the author gives us about human soul make up for the loss of rash adventure and buckets of blood, making imperative our desire to witness the end (or beginning?) of Tigana.
You will enjoy it.
MarF
Who knew it was possible to yearn so deeply for a lost name? Tigana is fantasy that explores the power of heritage, and the way in which our names shape us. How many of us spend a lifetime just trying to become who we truly are? Although it follows the conventions of good fantasy, Guy Gavriel Kay writes with a poetic spirit the elevates his writing above similar books in the genre. Highly recommended.

— David Khalaf, author, The Sixteen Burdens
Bundis
This is one of my all-time favorite books, and it remains a gripping story, even on the second or third reading. GGK is simply a masterful storyteller and if you've never read his work before, this is a great place to start. It's a complex, stirring, heart-wrenching tale featuring a cast of very human characters whose lives are bounded and shaped by magic in the Peninsula of the Palm, a land of nine distinct provinces dominated by two sorcerers who invaded simultaneously from different lands and remain in a tense stand-off almost 20 years later.

Tigana will get deep into your head and your heart, and stay there for ever.
Yramede
I found the writing both wonderful and unnecessarily wordy at the same time. I found the characters wonderful and less than interesting at the same time. I found the book too long and too short at the same time. I found the plot compelling and unnecessarily complex at the same time. I found the outcome thrilling and unsatisfying at the same time.

In other words, I spent much of the book wondering why I was reading it, and much of it fascinated by what I was reading.

No one in this book, except Alberico, is presented as wholly good or wholly evil. It seems clear at the end that love, not hate, could have been the answer for all, yet it becomes the grief of the story. We see that when the right thing happens, it is not because some righteous cause or moral sense, it is because one person loves another. Even victory over evil, fueled by hate, has a price.

I don't remember being so happy and depressed by the ending of a book.

It's not Lord of the Rings which I have re-read a half dozen times over the years. It will sit on my shelf and cause me to think whenever I happen to pass my eyes past it's cover. I recommend reading it, it which is unlike any other fantasy novel I have read, but be warned that you will be conflicted by it from beginning until past the ending.