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eBook The Coldest War (Milkweed) download
Fantasy
Author: Ian Tregillis
ISBN: 0765321513
Subcategory: Fantasy
Pages 352 pages
Publisher Tor Books (July 17, 2012)
Language English
Category: Fantasy
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 106
ePUB size: 1462 kb
FB2 size: 1757 kb
DJVU size: 1384 kb
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eBook The Coldest War (Milkweed) download

by Ian Tregillis


The Coldest War book. The Coldest War is the follow up to Ian Tregillis's debut alternate history come fantasy war drama Bitter Seeds and the Milkweed trilogy will conclude with the third novel Necessary Evil.

The Coldest War book. Someone is killing Britain's warlocks  . The series is an original take on the events and the aftermath of the World War II period of history and Britain's fight against Germany and Russia.

Tregillis ably mixes cold war paranoia with his mythology, and the cliffhanger ending sets up the concluding volume . IAN TREGILLIS lives near Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he works as a physicist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is a member of the George .

Tregillis ably mixes cold war paranoia with his mythology, and the cliffhanger ending sets up the concluding volume quite well. Martin Wild Cards writing collective and the author of The Milkweed Tryptich Bitter Seeds, The Coldest War and Necessary Evil.

In Ian Tregillis' The Coldest War, a precarious balance of power maintains the peace between Britain and the USSR. For decades, Britain's warlocks have been all that stands between the British Empire and the Soviet Union-a vast domain stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the shores of the English Channel. As Marsh is once again drawn into the world of Milkweed, he discovers that Britain's darkest acts didn't end with the war. And while he strives to protect queen and country, he is forced to confront his own willingness to accept victory at any cost. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Ian Tregillis is an American author. He is the author of the alternate history trilogy The Milkweed Triptych and a contributor to George R. R. Martin's Wild Cards series. He is an alumnus of the Clarion Workshop, and holds a P. The Mechanical (2015, ISBN 978-0316248006). The Rising (2015, ISBN 978-0356502335). The Liberation (2016, ISBN 978-0316248051). Bitter Seeds (2010, ISBN 978-0765321503). The Coldest War (2012, ISBN 978-0765321510). Necessary Evil (2013, ISBN 978-0765321527).

Ian tregillis series: Milkweed Triptych.

Thank you for your support of the author’s rights. For Sara, at long last. It was the first public execution in several years, and thus, despite the cold drizzle, a rather unwieldy crowd thronged the open spaces of the Binnenhof. Ian tregillis series: Milkweed Triptych. Other author's books: The Milkweed Triptych 01 - Bitter Seeds.

Books by Ian Tregillis: The Rising (The Alchemy Wars). 10. Necessary Evil (Milkweed Triptych). What Doctor Gottlieb Saw., 10. The Coldest War. The Milkweed Triptych 01 - Bitter Seeds.

In Ian Tregillis' The Coldest War, a precarious balance of power maintains . Milkweed (Volume 2). Ian Tregillis. Tregillis ably mixes cold war paranoia with his mythology, and the cliffhanger ending sets up the concluding volume quite well. For decades, Britain's warlocks have been.

The Coldest War. 420 printed pages. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

A precarious balance of power maintains the peace between Britain and the USSR. For decades, Britain's warlocks have been all that stands between the British Empire and the Soviet Union a vast domain stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the shores of the English Channel.

He was born and raised in Minnesota, where his parents had landed after fleeing the wrath of a Flemish prince. The full story, he's told, involves a Dutch tramp steamer and a stolen horse. Nowadays he lives in New Mexico, where he consorts with writers, scientists and other unsavoury types. Country of Publication.

In Ian Tregillis' The Coldest War, a precarious balance of power maintains the peace between Britain and the USSR. For decades, Britain's warlocks have been all that stands between the British Empire and the Soviet Union―a vast domain stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the shores of the English Channel. Now each wizard's death is another blow to Britain's national security.

Meanwhile, a brother and sister escape from a top-secret facility deep behind the Iron Curtain. Once subjects of a twisted Nazi experiment to imbue ordinary people with superhuman abilities, then prisoners of war in the immense Soviet research effort to reverse-engineer the Nazi technology, they head for England.

Because that's where former spy Raybould Marsh lives. And Gretel, the mad seer, has plans for him.

As Marsh is once again drawn into the world of Milkweed, he discovers that Britain's darkest acts didn't end with the war. And while he strives to protect queen and country, he is forced to confront his own willingness to accept victory at any cost.

Legionstatic
I got through this book in a few days and am already halfway through book three. So I guess the story is compelling, at least for me! I would definitely recommend starting with book one, "Bitter Seeds," because this won't make any sense without that background. Characters, concepts, and the alternative history timeline definitely carry through.

One complaint I had about the last volume had to do with character development. That is largely remedied here. If you read books for interesting characters, this will be more to your liking than book one (and book one was not bad, it was just lacking in this one area).

We are again following Marsh (a former intelligence agent who is roped back into service) and Will (warlock/sorcerer type who is also an aristocrat) but it is 1963. WWII is over and there is a fragile peace with communist Russia. Marsh is not so changed or deep in this book (but hold off until book 3, when his character really shines) but Will has undergone a transformation. He still feels incredible guilt about his role in the sorcerous defeat of Germany during WWII (because of the "blood prices" that had to be paid to carry out magical acts) and he is on a twisted quest for revenge, one that has him at risk for treason charges if he is found out. Against all this, he struggles with what to tell his wife (and he's shared a lot more than he ought to, already) as well as how to maintain at least the outward appearance of a normal life.

We also follow some of the residents of Dr. von Westarp's farm. (The not-so-good doctor did experiments on children to grant them superpowers to fight on the German side during WWII.) Those who survive are the Twins (not developed, but they do make an appearance here), Reinhardt, Klaus, and Klaus's sister Gretel. Reinhardt is not a major character but I do love the contrast between his trajectory and that of Klaus. Reinhardt and Klaus were always rivals back on the farm, and now that they have been apart for several decades, Klaus is ready to give up his superpowers, while Reinhardt has spent the intervening time in a desperate quest to get them back. (Granted, Klaus has been held during that time by the Soviets who are forcing him to train others they've modified using Dr. von Westarp's records for guidance, whereas Reinhardt has been eking out a living in the UK, taunted by children as he collects electronic junk. But, Klaus has also been with Gretel the whole time, and he starts losing faith in her.)

Anyway, Klaus is the most developed here and I think he is quite well done. You develop a lot of sympathy for him, sympathy that carries over into book 3, even though it is a different Klaus in book 3 (don't want to drop a major spoiler so I won't explain that any further). I love his reactions to freedom, to the chance to find love, to the ability to live alone, in privacy, to move about as he pleases, and to participate in activities of his choosing.

I was concerned about Gretel in book one. I just finished the author's "Alchemy Wars" series and the main antagonist by the end of that book seemed motivated by nothing but madness. I was concerned Gretel was going to turn out the same way. But she did not. Although she undoubtedly has some type of mental illness (and how could you not, after all she'd been through), her base motivation makes perfect sense and is understandable and relatable. I breathed a sigh of relief when I read that section.

I'm not quite so enthused about the plot this time. It was still a quick read and the writing was still great. And I do kind of see the point of this particular setting (in terms of timeline). Time had to pass for the characters to mature and come to terms with the events of book one (or at least attempt to come to terms) and the Soviets had to rise after the war for the characters to get to where they are at the start of this book. There needed to be an antagonist, Will needed to be put into a tight spot so he could be pressed back into service, Marsh needed to be pretty close to rock bottom. And the path to each scenario was pretty well laid out. But I kind of feel like the whole book was a downward spiral from the triumph of the British at the end of book one to get the characters to the point of true desperation at the end. Like this book only existed to set up book three. It just didn't feel as connected to me. That's not to say it was bad -- I really, really wanted to find out what happened next, and anything that keeps me reading is great -- but it just wasn't quite as compelling as book one for me.

Overall, though, I enjoyed the book quite a bit. I guess I would say the strengths were different from in book one, but that keeps it interesting. (And I would go so far as to say book three is better than either of the first two.) Once again, I am really enjoying how the author takes a historical moment, changes it slightly, and follows through the worldwide implications.
Varshav
This is the most "second book in a trilogy" I can remember ever reading. Second books are notorious for being filler or padding...just marking time until the third book comes along. This one does that to an extraordinary degree. I found the first book had potential that it didn't deliver on. I hoped some of the flaws might be righted in the sequel; that didn't happen. If you were merely on the fence about the first book, the second one isn't going to win you over.

The book starts out with a whimper by skipping forward 20-something years. That means we lose all the momentum from a "trilogy" and spend nearly the first one-quarter of the book re-establishing things. I found this part a pretty tough slog, though at the very end of the book there is an (unconvincing) explanation for why this happens. I'm still not remotely convinced that the two-decade time-jump was necessary.

The single biggest flaw of the first book returns for this one and remains unaddressed. Gretel is a seer who can (and has) foreseen everything that will happen in this book. There are a few lame attempts to talk about clockwork universes and self-determination but, philosophy aside, it drains the book of much of the tension. The only real tension revolves around Gretel's goals. Yet, curiously, no one in the book seems to really spend any time on that. That oversight only makes the characters (who are supposed to be cream of the crop British secret agents) seem buffoonish.

When, at the very end of this book, we finally do learn Gretel's motivations it is deeply unsatisfying. Other than dramatic suspense in a book, there's no good reason she had to be opaque and couldn't just tell everyone up-front 10-, 20-, or 30-years ago what was going on and why. There's an attempt at "I foresaw all possible futures and this was the only way things could have worked" but....you can use that excuse for anything.

I am struggling how Tregillis can possibly resolve this in a satisfying way given there has been no hint whatsoever of anyway to outsmart Gretel after two entire books.

The failure to deal well with Gretel is my biggest problem with these books so far. And the entire series hinges on her, making it a large weakness.

Spoiler Follow.

There is a recurrent theme of the characters and organisations in this book being incredibly stupid. Too many things happened that didn't make sense to me, leaving me feeling like they were plot contrivances rather than a natural consequence of what had come before. These are the kinds of things I mean:

- In the first book, during the raid the Eidolons, for the first time ever, don't honor the agreement and raise the price for the return ticket. At no point does Wil go, "Hey, maybe we should have a dedicated team of researchers looking into that for the next few decades because that seems important."

- When they mention that the children have moved the pins on the map no one goes, "Hey, maybe we should have a dedicated team of researchers looking into that until we figure out what's going on there."

- Marsh becomes head of Milkweed despite rejoining the organisation only days before after a two decade absence. There is some vague handwavey thing about seniority since he originally joined during WW2. That's not how any government works.

- No one seems to consider that the Soviets might have made improvements to the supermen, despite having had access to the original research and two decades to work on it.

- What was the purpose of the Soviet attack on London anyway?

- Finally, I found the explanation that Gretel hadn't used her powers in year and had simply memorised all of this to stretch credibility. For the large events, sure, okay, I'll let you have that one. But she even memorised what hands of cards everyone would get years in the future so she could win at rummy. Not only is she able to see the future but she has the greatest memory in human history? How convenient.