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eBook The Victorian Internet: The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century's On-Line Pioneers download
Engineering
Author: Tom Standage
ISBN: 0802713424
Subcategory: Engineering
Pages 227 pages
Publisher Walker & Co; 1 edition (October 1, 1998)
Language English
Category: Engineering
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 331
ePUB size: 1495 kb
FB2 size: 1411 kb
DJVU size: 1828 kb
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eBook The Victorian Internet: The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century's On-Line Pioneers download

by Tom Standage


The Victorian Internet tells the colorful story of the telegraph's creation and remarkable impact, and of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it, from the eighteenth-century French neurobiologist Jean-Antoine Nollet to Samuel F. B. Morse and Thomas Edison.

The Victorian Internet tells the colorful story of the telegraph's creation and remarkable impact, and of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it, from the eighteenth-century French neurobiologist Jean-Antoine Nollet to Samuel F. The electric telegraph nullified distance and shrank the world quicker and further than ever before or since, and its story mirrors and predicts that of the Internet in numerous ways. Categories: Other Social Sciences\Cultural.

This book tells the story of the telegraph's creation and remarkable impact, and of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it. By 1865 telegraph cables spanned continents and oceans, revolutionizing the ways countries dealt with one another, giving rise to creative. By 1865 telegraph cables spanned continents and oceans, revolutionizing the ways countries dealt with one another, giving rise to creative business practices and new forms of crime. Romances blossomed over the wires. The benefits of the network were hyped by advocates and dismissed by skeptics. Government regulators tried and failed to control the new medium.

Standage, Tom. "A colorful tale of scientific discovery and technological cunning, The Victorian Internet tells the story of the telegraph's creation and remarkable impact, and of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it. By 1865 telegraph cables spanned continents. By 1865 telegraph cables spanned continents and oceans, revolutionizing the ways countries dealt with one another. The telegraph gave rise to creative business practices and new forms of crime. Secret codes were devised by some users, and cracked by others

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The Victorian Internet tells the colorful story of the telegraph's creation and remarkable impact, and of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it, from the eighteenth-century French scientist Jean-Antoine Nollet to Samuel F.

In "The Victorian Internet," author Tom Standage tells the story of how the telegraph was a revolutionary advance in communications, how it shrunk the world, and how the advent of the telegraph was in many ways similar to the appearance of the Internet a century and a half later. Standage recounts the beginnings of the telegraph stretching back into the eighteenth century. He highlights the key figures who developed the telegraph, including Samuel Morse, and the fits and starts along the way that led to the maturation of the technology.

The Victorian Internet: the remarkable story of the telegraph and the nineteenth century's on-line pioneers/Tom Standage.

For information address Walker & Company, 104 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10011. The Victorian Internet: the remarkable story of the telegraph and the nineteenth century's on-line pioneers/Tom Standage. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Telegraph-History.

The Victorian Internet: The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century's On-Line Pioneers is a 1998 book by Tom Standage

The Victorian Internet: The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century's On-Line Pioneers is a 1998 book by Tom Standage.

The Victorian Internet. The Victorian Internet tells the colorful story of the telegraph's creation and remarkable impact, and. of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it, from the eighteenth-century French scientist Jean-Antoine Nollet to Samuel F.

Offers a historical review of the telegraph network, from its invention by Samuel Morse in the nineteenth century to the present day, exploring the social and political effects it has had on the world throughout its existence.
Erienan
"Time-traveling Victorians arriving in the late twentieth century would, no doubt, be unimpressed by the Internet." This excerpt from the epilogue is the best one sentence summary for the entire book.

While we marvel at the progress of our information networks in the past two decades - as we should - it is sometimes easy to forget that much of the same rhetoretoric and enthusiasm was shared more than 150 years earlier when the telegraph shrunk the world to a world-wide latency of minutes for any news or information. As such, the "Internet" has already been in existence for well over a century. Technology changed, latency improved by a constant factor, bandwidth improved by orders of magnitude, and the costs shrunk - yes, all true, but the basic structure is still the same.

Reading "Victorian Internet", it is easy to see that all one has to do is scrub out the word "telegraph" and replace it with the "world wide web", and you may as well be reading an article in your (online) newspaper.

Well organized book, with many great stories, facts, and research to keep you engaged throughout. If you're curious about the origins of the telegraph, and its evolution from a semaphore (visual telegraph) to backbone of all communication, then this is definitely "the book"!

P.S. Western Union discountined their telegraph business in 2002. Any bets on when we'll discontinue our TCP/IP routers? 2112?
Kashicage
A fun history of telecommunications relying heavily in fun anecdotes. Each inventions has it's base, creator, investors, entrepreneurs, and abusers. The story of the Blanc brothers who managed to hack the French government's optic telescope to make money off the stock market is among these :) The parallels with the modern world may be a bit out of date (1997 - he talks more of SMSs and e-mails) but it's not a far stretch
Weetont
Tom Standage mentions chronocentricity on p 213 as "the egotism that one's own generation is poised on the very cusp of history." Comparing modern times to the past, he says "if any generation has the right to claim that it bore the full bewildering, world-shrinking brunt of such a revolution, it is not us -- it is our nineteenth-century forbears." Commentator Gary Hoover defines chronocentricity as being "obsessed with our own era, considering it the most important or most dynamic time ever." Being a history major, I find The Victorian Internet (TVI) to be an enlightening antidote to chronocentricity, and I recommend it to anyone trying to better understand modern times through the lens of history.

In TVI, readers will encounter themes very familiar to those involved with the latest telecommunications revolution: using communications to catch criminals; concerns with privacy, and an inability to identify users; application of codes and encryption to foil thieves and governments, if possible; corruption affecting various aspects of the system; heavy reliance by the financial industry; operator jargon; dealing with load and congestion; transmission errors causing financial problems; users not understanding technology; technology staying ahead of the law; and governments intercepting, copying, and analyzing transmissions.

Probably one of the most interesting themes in the book involved expectations that improved communications would lead to world peace. While reading the book a student asked me if the rise of Web 2.0 and social networking sites would result in increased understanding among those of different faiths, hopefully leading to a more peaceful world. At the very least, after reading a book like TVI, I can say the Victorian Internet didn't result in world peace.
Jaiarton
My father was born in 1908, and grew up engaged in both amateur and professional radio. All his life he tried to bring up his telegraphy speed to that required to get an "Amateur Extra" ham radio license for his home radio facility. He never made it. Then I came along and suggested that he learn ASCII, the code being used for data transmissions in the computer world. He didn't get the joke.

This book reminded me of his connection to telegraphy and made me realize both how much of modern life isn't really new--but also how recently the genuinely new stuff happened. In particular, it never occurred to me before reading this book how incredible a step it was in the nineteenth century to be able to send messages over wires. Literally nothing like it had ever occurred before.

And here we youngsters think that the internet is such a big deal. It is, of course, but the kinds of "revolutionary" characteristics we apply to it, actually had occurred before. The world seems smaller. Business can be transacted more efficiently. Romance is kindled. Both crime and crime prevention take on new aspects. Maybe world peace will be accomplished.

The book is a good narrative of what happened when telegraphy over long distances became possible. Its only shortcoming was that the descriptions of each device were too superficial. I would have liked to understand better how each one worked.

I do love the ironic note that ended the book: After the telegraph was replaced by telephones, and they were supplanted by the likes of worldwide Internet visual conferences, the new generation of youngsters are absolutely enamored with--get this!--how cool it is to be able to send text back and forth to each other! (Just this week I was talking to a colleague whose daughter refuses to speak by telephone. Anyone wanting to court her has to send a text message.)

After all, AT&T really is the American Telephone and Telegraph company.