» » Morality and Architecture Revisited
eBook Morality and Architecture Revisited download
Engineering
Author: David Watkin
ISBN: 0226874834
Subcategory: Engineering
Pages 191 pages
Publisher University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2001)
Language English
Category: Engineering
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 767
ePUB size: 1112 kb
FB2 size: 1793 kb
DJVU size: 1872 kb
Other formats: lit lrf rtf azw

eBook Morality and Architecture Revisited download

by David Watkin


When Morality and Architecture was first published in 1977, it received passionate praise and equally passionate criticism. David Watkin is a reader in the history of architecture at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Peterhouse.

When Morality and Architecture was first published in 1977, it received passionate praise and equally passionate criticism. His many books include A History of Western Architecture, The Rise of Architectural History, and Sir John Soane: Enlightenment Thought and the Royal Academy Lectures.

Morality and Architecture Revisited book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Morality and Architecture Revisited as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

David John Watkin, FRIBA FSA (7 April 1941 – 30 August 2018) was a British architectural historian. He was an emeritus fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge, and professor emeritus of History of Architecture in the Department of History of Art at the University of Cambridge. He also taught at the Prince of Wales's Institute of Architecture.

When "Morality and Architecture" was first published in 1977, it recieved passionate praise and equally passionate criticism. This is the story of the book's imapct. In writing his polemic David Watkin had taken on the entire modernist establishment, tracing it back to Pugin, Viollet-de-Duc, le Corbusier, and others who claimed that their chosen style had to be truthful and rational, reflecting society's needs. Any critic of this style was considered anti-social and immoral. Only covertly did the giants of the architectural establishment support the author.

When "Morality and Architecture" was first published in 1977, it received passionate praise and equally passionate criticism.

Morality and architecture

Morality and architecture. Heidegger and Gadamer, while the other is referred to a critical attitude towards knowledge which departs from the Nietzschean critique of values and is related principally to philosophers as Lyotard, Derrida and Deleuze. We will start our discussion with the polemic of the art historian David Watkin against any attempt to ground architecture on morality, expressed in his book Morality and Architecture, first published by Oxford University Press in 1977. Watkin maintains that the claim of architecture to morality undermines individual imagination as well as the aesthetic value of the work carried on by artistic tradition.

Morality and Architecture Revisited - Volume 6 Issue 3 - Frank Arneil Walker. Whether the book merits this jubilee re-issue is open to some debate. Twenty-five years after its publication in 1977, David Watkin's ‘time-bomb’ demolition of Modernist architectural theory has appeared under the cliché-augmented title Morality and Architecture Revisited. Here, for the first time, is the story of the book's impact.

Watkin's Morality and Architecture first came out in that year. Now reprinted, with additional material, as Morality and Architecture Revisited, its battles seem very old indeed. It was an accurate, informed and powerful attack on a tradition of architectural theory, which stated that architects were under a quasi-religious duty to build in the style of their own time, and that anything decorative or evocative of the past was in some way immoral. In its dafter forms, this theory held that tea would supplant alcohol as the true beverage of the modern age, and that boxes of chocolates depicting flower arrangements were deeply wicked.

When Morality and Architecture was first published in 1977, it received passionate praise and equally passionate criticism. An editorial in Apollo, entitled "The Time Bomb," claimed that "it deserved to become a set book in art school and University art history departments," and the Times Literary Supplement savaged it as an example of "that kind of vindictiveness of which only Christians seem capable."Here, for the first time, is the story of the book's impact. In writing his groundbreaking polemic, David Watkin had taken on the entire modernist establishment, tracing it back to Pugin, Viollet-le-Duc, Corbusier, and others who claimed that their chosen style had to be truthful and rational, reflecting society's needs. Any critic of this style was considered antisocial and immoral. Only covertly did the giants of the architectural establishment support the author. Watkin gives an overview of what has happened since the book's publication, arguing that many of the old fallacies still persist. This return to the attack is a revelation for anyone concerned architecture's past and future.