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eBook Student Participation in Online Discussions: Challenges, Solutions, and Future Research download
Education
Author: Wing Sum Cheung,Khe Foon Hew
ISBN: 1461423694
Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
Pages 142 pages
Publisher Springer; 2012 edition (June 14, 2012)
Language English
Category: Education
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 538
ePUB size: 1627 kb
FB2 size: 1159 kb
DJVU size: 1730 kb
Other formats: mbr doc mbr rtf

eBook Student Participation in Online Discussions: Challenges, Solutions, and Future Research download

by Wing Sum Cheung,Khe Foon Hew


Authors: Hew, Khe Foon, Cheung, Wing Su. Bibliographic Information. Student Participation in Online Discussions.

Using students as facilitators may be an alternative solution to educators who wish to avoid the ion guideline dilemma. Using audio discussion would be useful for participants with poor typing skills or those who prefer talking to typing. The proposed book is distinctive in comparison to current competitor titles because all the findings and guidelines are empirically-based.

It then identifies the various empirically-based guidelines to address the factors.

Audio-based versus text-based asynchronous online discussion: Two case studies.

Springer Science & Business Media, 2012. Audio-based versus text-based asynchronous online discussion: Two case studies. Instructional Science 41 (2), 365-380, 2013.

Khe Foon Hew, Wing Sum Cheung.

Khe Foon Hew. Wing Sum Cheung. Khe Foon Hew, Wing Sum Cheung. Asynchronous online discussions Audio based online discussion Instructor facilitation of online discussion Online learning participation Peer facilitation of online discussion Student facilitation of online discussion. Authors and affiliations. Khe Foon Hew. 1.

Student Participation in Online Discussions : Challenges, Solutions, and . by Khe Foon Hew and Wing Sum Cheung

by Khe Foon Hew and Wing Sum Cheung.

Wing-Sum Cheung, Khe Foon Hew, Connie S. L. N. This study explores the relative effectiveness of in class online discussion and face to face, tutor led discussion in preservice teachers' recall of concepts. Ng. 2008. The use of online learning is growing very fast in universities. Consequently, understanding how to promote student contribution in asynchronous online discussions, which is considered an integra. More). Two groups of preservice teachers, wh.

Not many investigated student facilitation. This article reports a qualitative study examining the facilitation techniques used by student facilitators to attract their course mates to participate in asynchronous online discussions. Data were collected from the students’ reflection logs and students’ online postings

Hew, Khe Foon and Wing Sum Cheung. Data were collected from 12 online discussion forums involving undergraduate students and students’ reflection logs.

Hew, Khe Foon and Wing Sum Cheung. Fostering Higher Knowledge Construction Levels in Online Discussion Forums: An Exploratory Case Study.

The increasingly prevalent use of online- or blended-learning in schools universities has resulted in asynchronous online discussion forum becoming an increasingly common means to facilitate dialogue between instructors and students, as well as students and students beyond the boundaries of their physical classrooms.   This proposed academic book contributes to the literature on asynchronous online discussions in the following three main ways: First, it reviews previous research studies in order to identify the factors leading to limited student contribution. Limited student contribution is defined as students making few or no postings, students exhibiting surface-level thinking or students demonstrating low-level knowledge construction in online discussions. It then identifies the various empirically-based guidelines to address the factors.  Second, three potential guideline dilemmas that educators may encounter: (a) use of grades, (b) use of number of posting guideline, and (c) instructor-facilitation are introduced. These are guidelines where previous empirical research shows mixed results when they are implemented. Acknowledging the dilemmas is essential for educators and researchers to make informed decisions about the discussion guidelines they are considering implementing.  Third, nine exploratory case studies related to student-facilitation and audio-based discussion are reported on and examined. Using students as facilitators may be an alternative solution to educators who wish to avoid the instructor-facilitation guideline dilemma. Using audio discussion would be useful for participants with poor typing skills or those who prefer talking to typing.  The proposed book is distinctive in comparison to current competitor titles because all the findings and guidelines are empirically-based. Furthermore, the nine expanded case studies provided specifically address the issue of student/peer facilitation and audio-based discussion. Student/peer facilitation and audio discussion are two areas that hitherto received comparatively lesser attention compared to instructor facilitation and text-based discussion. ​