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eBook A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change download
Education
Author: Douglas Thomas
ISBN: 1456458884
Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
Pages 140 pages
Publisher CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (January 4, 2011)
Language English
Category: Education
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 973
ePUB size: 1461 kb
FB2 size: 1786 kb
DJVU size: 1957 kb
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eBook A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change download

by Douglas Thomas


view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. To be immersed in a world of learning, as Thomas and Brown say, is the real inspiration I recall from my college days at Davidson, and what I now see among my students at Brown. But thirty years make a difference.

In A New Culture of Learning, Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue . Joi Ito: The New Culture of Learning: cultivating imagination for a world of constant flux.

In A New Culture of Learning, Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change, and emerging waves of interest associated with these forces, inspire and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic.

A New Culture of Learning book. The twenty-first century is a world in constant change  . In A New Culture of Learning, Doug Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change, and emerging waves of interest associated with these forces, inspire and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic. Typically, when we think of culture, we think The twenty-first century is a world in constant change.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 122-133)

Includes bibliographical references (p. 122-133). Arc-of-life learning - A tale of two cultures - Embracing change - Learning in the collective - The personal with the collective - We know more than we can say - Knowing, making, and playing - Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out - The new culture of learning for a world of. Constant change.

In A New Culture of Learning, Doug Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change .

In A New Culture of Learning, Doug Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change, and emerging waves of interest associated with these forces, inspire and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic. Typically, when we think of culture, we think of an existing, stable entity that changes and evolves over long periods of time. In A New Culture, Thomas and Brown explore a second sense of culture, one that responds to its surroundings organically.

Book · January 2011 with 216 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. Cite this publication. University of Southern California. 118+ million publications.

book by John Seely Brown.

Thomas and Brown posit that the current school system should reflect the newer .

Thomas and Brown posit that the current school system should reflect the newer culture of learning that is really not confined to existing school curricula and classrooms; rather, learning happens everywhere, anytime, and sometimes even without teachers.

Today, I want to call attention to a significant new book, A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change, written by two of my new colleagues at the University of Southern California - Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown

Today, I want to call attention to a significant new book, A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change, written by two of my new colleagues at the University of Southern California - Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown. Asked to write a blurb for this book, here's what I had to say: A New Culture of Learning may be for the Digital Media and Learning movement what Thomas Paine's Common Sense provided for the American Revolution - a straight forward, direct explanation of what we are fighting for and what we are fighting against.

He is Associate Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California where he studies technology, communication, and culture References. Douglas Thomas (24 July 2002).

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The twenty-first century is a world in constant change. In A New Culture of Learning, Doug Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change, and emerging waves of interest associated with these forces, inspire and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic.

Typically, when we think of culture, we think of an existing, stable entity that changes and evolves over long periods of time. In A New Culture, Thomas and Brown explore a second sense of culture, one that responds to its surroundings organically. It not only adapts, it integrates change into its process as one of its environmental variables. By exploring play, innovation, and the cultivation of the imagination as cornerstones of learning, the authors create a vision of learning for the future that is achievable, scalable and one that grows along with the technology that fosters it and the people who engage with it. The result is a new form of culture in which knowledge is seen as fluid and evolving, the personal is both enhanced and refined in relation to the collective, and the ability to manage, negotiate and participate in the world is governed by the play of the imagination.

Replete with stories, this is a book that looks at the challenges that our education and learning environments face in a fresh way.

PRAISE FOR A NEW CULTURE OF LEARNING

“A provocative and extremely important new paradigm of a ‘culture of learning’, appropriate for a world characterized by continual change. This is a must read for anyone interested in the future of education.”

James J. Duderstadt, President Emeritus, University of Michigan

“Thomas and Brown are the John Dewey of the digital age.”

Cathy Davidson, Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Duke University

“A New Culture of Learning may provide for the digital media and learning movement what Thomas Paine’s Common Sense did for the colonists during the American Revolution— a straightforward, direct explanation of what we are fighting for and what we are fighting against.”

Henry Jenkins, Provost’s Professor, USC

“A New Culture of Learning is at once persuasive and optimistic — a combination that is all too rare, but that flows directly from its authors’ insights about learning in the digital age. Pearls of wisdom leap from almost every page.”

Paul Courant, Dean of Libraries, University of Michigan

“Brilliant. Insightful. Revolutionary.”

Marcia Conner, author of The New Social Learning

“Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown portray the new world of learning gracefully, vividly, and convincingly.”

Howard Gardner, Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Education

“Thomas and Brown make it clear that education is too often a mechanistic, solo activity delivered to the young. It doesn’t have to be that way—learning can be a messy, social, playful, embedded, constant activity. We would do well to listen to their message.”

Clay Shirky, author of Cognitive Surplus

“Anyone who fears, as I do, that today’s public schools are dangerously close to being irrelevant must read this book. The authors provide a road map—and a lifeline—showing how schools can prosper under the most difficult conditions. It is a welcome departure from all the school bashing.”

John Merrow, Education Correspondent, PBS NewsHour

“American education is at a crossroads. By illuminating how play helps to transform both information networks and experimentation, and how collective inquiry unleashes the power of imagination, A New Culture of Learning provides an irresistible path to the future.”

Joel Myerson, Director, Forum for the Future of Higher Education

Zeus Wooden
Anybody who cares about how we might engage a world of increasing complexity, uncertainty, and possibility needs to read this book. Educators especially need to pay attention.

We want to instill a passion for learning, but we typically address our desire by first thinking about designs - of syllabi, curricula, distribution requirements and more. Thomas and Brown invite us to change our starting point by asking how people learn today in a world with unprecedented access to information.

The authors invite us to recall that disturbing memory - even when America was poised to invade Iraq, most US citizens could not find Iraq on the map. But some, Thomas and Brown suggest, would simply draw on their internet facility to find the answer. While we should expect more of a citizenry in what they know, we should also think anew about how people learn.

Yes, people learn in classrooms, but the authors encourage us to think about how people develop their knowledge beyond the classroom. Colleges are great not just for what the professors offer, but what the students do with their assignments off hours. To be immersed in a world of learning, as Thomas and Brown say, is the real inspiration I recall from my college days at Davidson, and what I now see among my students at Brown. But thirty years make a difference.

My college learning depended on terrific anchors - an honor code that assured integrity, a set of distribution requirements that inspired breadth, and a college culture that could move my passion from golf to sociology. Today's culture of learning, the authors propose, flows more, relying less on preexisting stocks of knowledge or fixed cultures of intellectual authority and more on a passion for learning that itself is a form of play.

My students and I discussed this book in our class on knowledge networks and global transformations yesterday. These digital natives debated it - how American are the assumptions? How much can we trust that this new culture of learning moves toward truthfulness rather than truthiness? Are there ways to move digitally produced collectives toward more ethical behavior, and away from destructive practice? It was a great discussion, evidenced by how it continued well beyond the classroom.

As I listened, I wondered whether in fact I was observing just what Thomas and Brown were describing - this different culture of learning in action, and whether, in that assembly, I was seeing in formation that next incarnation of the thing which made Brown University famous more than three decades ago: its new curriculum.

Universities and colleges are embracing, at different paces, the revolutions in information and communication technology, from digitalizing libraries to blended online and onsite learning. But after this volume and its classroom discussion, I would like to understand better the effect and potential of this new culture of learning in higher education. And it begins with these questions:

Do Thomas and Brown capture this new culture well? It strikes most of my students to be on target, but it does call out for more research.

How does this new culture of learning combine with traditions in liberal arts? There are complements to be sure, but there are some real tensions that need to be faced.

Even as the information revolution promises to globalize knowledge, it proceeds with the accents of its vanguard. Are there ways that the global conversation might find and elevate the diversity that the authors themselves acknowledge to be the fount of creativity?

"Where imaginations play, learning happens". That's the message, that's the invitation, and that's the hope. And next time we figure out how to assess our institutions of higher education, let's identify the spaces for imagination in our local worlds of learning.
Liarienen
This book is an excellent and well researched of how, due to technological change, it is now possible to envision a school system that moves from a teaching centred model to a learning centred model creating a new culture of learning. Among other things, they note, for example, that many criticize the current generation for not reading enough, but if you look at sites like the Harry Potter fan sites, quite young children are writing reams of material just for fun. So they're not just reading, they're creating material in a way that schools currently neither recognize nor encourage. This aspect of following one's passions and being creative are among the forces that are driving the new culture of learning.
Meztihn
The first six chapters of this book are remarkably insightful. The authors offer innovative examples just how our digital world is altering the means and methods of effective education. The last three chapters left me with more questions than answers (and perhaps that was part of the goal, since questioning and reframing are extolled). Our world is changing to be sure, but "to what" isn't developed beyond models inadequate to the question---the gaming example seems more symptom/by-product than predictive for it is almost entirely context based. Gaming is an excellent example of self-organized communities gathering to meet a challenge for entertainment, but in reality it is also a consequence free environment.

This volume is highly recommended to anyone curious about the impact of technology on our children and our culture.
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
"A New Culture of Learning" by Thomas and Brown should be a required read for all educators. The text walks us through how students interact in today's world. A couple of things have always interested me while teaching. First, if we want to educate all students how do we reach those that are completely disconnected from learning or at least how we teach in schools presently. As a High School teacher in North Carolina teaching Career and Technical education curriculum, I find that some of my students are not academically motivated. They are the ones that "keep me up at night". How do you reach a child that feels school has nothing to give them? What also seems to be connected to this thought is the fact that many of these students are accomplished at computer games. I have tried computer games and continue to be amazed at the abilities and complexities required to master these games. How can we as educators tap into this learning model? How does this generation learn? Are we missing an opportunity in not utilizing technology in the classroom? If these questions peek your interest then this is the book to read. The authors do a great job of relating how students of this generation learn and how education might shift to incorporate this learning style.
Wizer
as a nonprofit, NYSED lic. Business school & a Microsoft Ofc. Cert. Trng Ctr serving young adults on the Autism Spectrum to acquire competitive work skills for the past 14 yrs., we have found the policies & models espoused in this excellant book to be "spot-on".we were not effective using traditional teaching methods. we use a lot of Skype/FaceTime to teach MS work skills to a population that prefers Computers to people. we named this ability; "Cybility".we're in the process of setting up the site (cybility.org) & field testing our Cybility Tutorials (Word/PowerPoint/Excel/Publisher,etc) in several high school Transition Prgms for Spec.ED pops.
Stoneshaper
Reasonable good book