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eBook Telling a Different Story: Teaching and Literacy in an Urban Preschool (Early Childhood Education Series) download
Education
Author: Leslie R. Williams,Catherine Wilson
ISBN: 0807738999
Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
Pages 120 pages
Publisher Teachers College Press (December 1, 1999)
Language English
Category: Education
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 691
ePUB size: 1895 kb
FB2 size: 1525 kb
DJVU size: 1857 kb
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eBook Telling a Different Story: Teaching and Literacy in an Urban Preschool (Early Childhood Education Series) download

by Leslie R. Williams,Catherine Wilson


Telling a Different Story. has been added to your Cart. In an era when conversations about reading are occurring everywhere, and at the same time we are seeking to refine our understanding of reflective teaching, Wilson’s book is timely and powerful

Telling a Different Story. In an era when conversations about reading are occurring everywhere, and at the same time we are seeking to refine our understanding of reflective teaching, Wilson’s book is timely and powerful. Full of dilemmas, anxieties, and struggles, she tells an intricate and finely detailed story about teachers and children transforming each other. Carol Brunson Phillips, Executive Director, Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition.

Article in Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk (JESPAR) 7(3):357-360 · July .

Article in Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk (JESPAR) 7(3):357-360 · July 2002 with 4 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. September 2015 · Teachers College Record. April 2008 · Journal of Early Childhood Literacy.

Telling a Different Story book. This clear, thought-provoking close study of teaching practices. Drawing on the recent knowledge base on childhood literacy, Wilson looks forward, highlighting and discussing a new set of questions about prevailing prescriptions for "developm This clear, thought-provoking close study of teaching practices invites us into the classroom of a Head Start teacher and her assistant as they confront the challenges of early childhood education.

Solution for: Early Childhood Education. Education To Be More' was published last August. It was the report of the New Zealand Government's Early Childhood Care and Education Working Group. Unquestionably, that's a real need; but since parents don't normally send children to pre-schools until the age of three, are we missing out on the most important years of all? B.

Telling a Different Story: Teaching and Literacy in an Urban Preschool.

Story telling & comprehension. Contextualised and decontextualised.

Early childhood education (ECE; also nursery education) is a branch of education theory that relates to the teaching of children (formally and informally) from birth up to the age of eight. Traditionally, this is up to the equivalent of third grade. ECE emerged as a field of study during the Enlightenment, particularly in European countries with high literacy rates. It continued to grow through the nineteenth century as universal primary education became a norm in the Western world.

Our top 25 best books on early childhood education offers both comprehensive and more honed-in directives for educating to this very important group of minds.

Educators have increasingly adopted formalized approaches for teaching literacy skills in early childhood education. Three classes in a public preschool in Indonesia participated in an experimental study involving 45 children, aged 5–6 years. Across 3 weeks, one experimental condition received storytelling activities and a second experimental condition received digital storytelling activities. The control condition received regular literacy classroom activities.

Literacy in Early Childhood and Primary Education (3-8 years).

This clear, thought-provoking close study of teaching practices invites us into the classroom of a Head Start teacher and her assistant as they confront the challenges of early childhood education. Through classroom scenes and dialogue, Catherine Wilson explores the role that reading to children plays in an early childhood program. Drawing on the recent knowledge base on childhood literacy, Wilson looks forward, highlighting and discussing a new set of questions about prevailing prescriptions for “developmentally appropriate practice” and emergent literacy. She focuses directly on story reading and the decisions that teachers make in using children’s literature in their teaching as well as the impact of public policy on teachers, children, and families. This well-written volume will interest teachers, teacher educators, and anyone concerned with childhood literacy and improving classroom practices.